Bailey JA

References (4)

Title : A novel effect of rivastigmine on pre-synaptic proteins and neuronal viability in a neurodegeneration model of fetal rat primary cortical cultures and its implication in Alzheimer's disease - Bailey_2010_J.Neurochem_112_843
Author(s) : Bailey JA , Lahiri DK
Ref : Journal of Neurochemistry , 112 :843 , 2010
Abstract : Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deposition of amyloid-beta peptide plaque, disrupted amyloid-beta-precursor protein (APP) metabolism, hyperphosphorylation of Tau leading to neurofibrillary tangles and associated neurotoxicity. Moreover, there is synaptic loss in AD, which occurs early and may precede frank amyloidosis. The central cholinergic system is especially vulnerable to the toxic events associated with AD, and reduced acetylcholine levels in specific brain regions is thought to be central to memory deficits in AD. First-generation cholinesterase inhibitors have provided only symptomatic relief to patients with AD by prolonging the action of remaining acetylcholine with little or no change in the course of the disease. Some second-generation cholinesterase inhibitors are multifunctional drugs that may provide more than purely palliative results. To evaluate the effects of the dual acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine on key aspects of AD, embryonic day 16 rat primary cortical cultures were treated with rivastigmine under media conditions observed to induce time-dependent neurodegeneration. Samples were subjected to western blotting and immunocytochemistry techniques to determine what influence this drug may have on synaptic proteins and neuronal morphology. There was a strong increase in relative cell viability associated with rivastigmine treatment. Significant dose-dependent increases were observed in the levels of synaptic markers synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and synaptophysin, as well as the neuron-specific form of enolase. Together with an observed enhancement of neuronal morphology, our results suggest a rivastigmine-mediated novel neuroprotective and/or neurorestorative effects involving the synapse. Our observations may explain the potential for rivastigmine to alter the course of AD, and warrant further investigations into using butyrylcholinesterase inhibition as a therapeutic strategy for AD, especially with regard to restoration of synaptic function.
ESTHER : Bailey_2010_J.Neurochem_112_843
PubMedSearch : Bailey_2010_J.Neurochem_112_843
PubMedID: 19912467

Title : Organophosphate antidote auto-injectors vs. traditional administration: a time motion study - Rebmann_2009_J.Emerg.Med_37_139
Author(s) : Rebmann T , Clements BW , Bailey JA , Evans RG
Ref : J Emerg Med , 37 :139 , 2009
Abstract : Organophosphates may be used as weapons in chemical attacks on civilian or military populations. Antidotes are available to counter the effects of organophosphates, but they must be administered shortly after exposure. Timing required to administer organophosphate antidotes using traditional equipment vs. auto-injectors has not been studied. This study is intended to quantify and compare the time required to administer organophosphate antidotes using traditional equipment vs. auto-injectors in different treatment conditions. The study was a randomized, un-blinded design. There were 62 participants assigned to one of three groups: Mark I, ATNAA (antidote treatment nerve agent auto-injector), and traditional needle/syringe; however, the results from only 56 participants could be analyzed. Injection trials were videotaped. Subjects also completed a 14-item survey containing demographic questions, perceived ease of injection, receipt of prior training, and preferred training format for organophosphate treatment. Injection time differentials were compared using one-way analysis of variance; post hoc evaluation was performed using the Scheffe test with Bonferroni correction. Fifty-six subjects completed this study. The ATNAA required less time to administer than the Mark I or traditional needle/syringe devices (p < .001). There was no difference in time to administer the Mark I auto-injectors vs. a traditional needle/syringe. There were no differences between injection time and occupation, receipt of prior training, wearing of personal protective equipment, or perceived ease of injection device use. The use of auto-injectors shortens response time for administering organophosphate antidote treatment. An ATNAA auto-injector can be administered in less than half the time it takes to administer a single injection using a needle and syringe or two injections using a Mark I. Mark I can be administered in approximately the same amount of time it takes to administer a single injection using a needle and syringe. The difference between injection time for the ATNAA and needle and syringe would have been even larger if two injections were given with the needle and syringe. The wearing or absence of personal protective equipment does not affect injection time.
ESTHER : Rebmann_2009_J.Emerg.Med_37_139
PubMedSearch : Rebmann_2009_J.Emerg.Med_37_139
PubMedID: 18514464

Title : Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution - Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Scherer S , Scott G , Steffen D , Worley KC , Burch PE , Okwuonu G , Hines S , Lewis L , DeRamo C , Delgado O , Dugan-Rocha S , Miner G , Morgan M , Hawes A , Gill R , Celera , Holt RA , Adams MD , Amanatides PG , Baden-Tillson H , Barnstead M , Chin S , Evans CA , Ferriera S , Fosler C , Glodek A , Gu Z , Jennings D , Kraft CL , Nguyen T , Pfannkoch CM , Sitter C , Sutton GG , Venter JC , Woodage T , Smith D , Lee HM , Gustafson E , Cahill P , Kana A , Doucette-Stamm L , Weinstock K , Fechtel K , Weiss RB , Dunn DM , Green ED , Blakesley RW , Bouffard GG , de Jong PJ , Osoegawa K , Zhu B , Marra M , Schein J , Bosdet I , Fjell C , Jones S , Krzywinski M , Mathewson C , Siddiqui A , Wye N , McPherson J , Zhao S , Fraser CM , Shetty J , Shatsman S , Geer K , Chen Y , Abramzon S , Nierman WC , Havlak PH , Chen R , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Ren Y , Song XZ , Li B , Liu Y , Qin X , Cawley S , Cooney AJ , D'Souza LM , Martin K , Wu JQ , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Jackson AR , Kalafus KJ , McLeod MP , Milosavljevic A , Virk D , Volkov A , Wheeler DA , Zhang Z , Bailey JA , Eichler EE , Tuzun E , Birney E , Mongin E , Ureta-Vidal A , Woodwark C , Zdobnov E , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Alexandersson M , Trask BJ , Young JM , Huang H , Wang H , Xing H , Daniels S , Gietzen D , Schmidt J , Stevens K , Vitt U , Wingrove J , Camara F , Mar Alba M , Abril JF , Guigo R , Smit A , Dubchak I , Rubin EM , Couronne O , Poliakov A , Hubner N , Ganten D , Goesele C , Hummel O , Kreitler T , Lee YA , Monti J , Schulz H , Zimdahl H , Himmelbauer H , Lehrach H , Jacob HJ , Bromberg S , Gullings-Handley J , Jensen-Seaman MI , Kwitek AE , Lazar J , Pasko D , Tonellato PJ , Twigger S , Ponting CP , Duarte JM , Rice S , Goodstadt L , Beatson SA , Emes RD , Winter EE , Webber C , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Adetobi M , Chiaromonte F , Elnitski L , Eswara P , Hardison RC , Hou M , Kolbe D , Makova K , Miller W , Nekrutenko A , Riemer C , Schwartz S , Taylor J , Yang S , Zhang Y , Lindpaintner K , Andrews TD , Caccamo M , Clamp M , Clarke L , Curwen V , Durbin R , Eyras E , Searle SM , Cooper GM , Batzoglou S , Brudno M , Sidow A , Stone EA , Payseur BA , Bourque G , Lopez-Otin C , Puente XS , Chakrabarti K , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Bray N , Yap VB , Caspi A , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Haussler D , Roskin KM , Baertsch R , Clawson H , Furey TS , Hinrichs AS , Karolchik D , Kent WJ , Rosenbloom KR , Trumbower H , Weirauch M , Cooper DN , Stenson PD , Ma B , Brent M , Arumugam M , Shteynberg D , Copley RR , Taylor MS , Riethman H , Mudunuri U , Peterson J , Guyer M , Felsenfeld A , Old S , Mockrin S , Collins F
Ref : Nature , 428 :493 , 2004
Abstract : The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedID: 15057822
Gene_locus related to this paper: rat-abhea , rat-abheb , rat-cd029 , rat-d3zaw4 , rat-dpp9 , rat-d3zhq1 , rat-d3zkp8 , rat-d3zuq1 , rat-d3zxw8 , rat-d4a4w4 , rat-d4a7w1 , rat-d4a9l7 , rat-d4a071 , rat-d4aa31 , rat-d4aa33 , rat-d4aa61 , rat-dglb , rat-f1lz91 , rat-Kansl3 , rat-nceh1 , rat-Tex30 , ratno-1hlip , ratno-1neur , ratno-1plip , ratno-2neur , ratno-3neur , ratno-3plip , ratno-ABH15 , ratno-ACHE , ratno-balip , ratno-BCHE , ratno-cauxin , ratno-Ces1d , ratno-Ces1e , ratno-Ces2f , ratno-d3ze31 , ratno-d3zp14 , ratno-d3zxi3 , ratno-d3zxq0 , ratno-d3zxq1 , ratno-d4a3d4 , ratno-d4aa05 , ratno-dpp4 , ratno-dpp6 , ratno-est8 , ratno-FAP , ratno-hyep , ratno-hyes , ratno-kmcxe , ratno-lmcxe , ratno-LOC246252 , ratno-MGLL , ratno-pbcxe , ratno-phebest , ratno-Ppgb , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q6ayr2 , ratno-q6q629 , ratno-SPG21 , ratno-thyro , rat-m0rc77 , rat-a0a0g2k9y7 , rat-a0a0g2kb83 , rat-d3zba8 , rat-d3zbj1 , rat-d3zcr8 , rat-d3zxw5 , rat-d4a340 , rat-f1lvg7 , rat-m0r509 , rat-m0r5d4 , rat-b5den3 , rat-d3zxk4 , rat-d4a1b6 , rat-d3zmg4 , rat-ab17c

Title : The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7 - Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Graves TA , Pepin KH , Wagner-McPherson C , Layman D , Maas J , Jaeger S , Walker R , Wylie K , Sekhon M , Becker MC , O'Laughlin MD , Schaller ME , Fewell GA , Delehaunty KD , Miner TL , Nash WE , Cordes M , Du H , Sun H , Edwards J , Bradshaw-Cordum H , Ali J , Andrews S , Isak A , Vanbrunt A , Nguyen C , Du F , Lamar B , Courtney L , Kalicki J , Ozersky P , Bielicki L , Scott K , Holmes A , Harkins R , Harris A , Strong CM , Hou S , Tomlinson C , Dauphin-Kohlberg S , Kozlowicz-Reilly A , Leonard S , Rohlfing T , Rock SM , Tin-Wollam AM , Abbott A , Minx P , Maupin R , Strowmatt C , Latreille P , Miller N , Johnson D , Murray J , Woessner JP , Wendl MC , Yang SP , Schultz BR , Wallis JW , Spieth J , Bieri TA , Nelson JO , Berkowicz N , Wohldmann PE , Cook LL , Hickenbotham MT , Eldred J , Williams D , Bedell JA , Mardis ER , Clifton SW , Chissoe SL , Marra MA , Raymond C , Haugen E , Gillett W , Zhou Y , James R , Phelps K , Iadanoto S , Bubb K , Simms E , Levy R , Clendenning J , Kaul R , Kent WJ , Furey TS , Baertsch RA , Brent MR , Keibler E , Flicek P , Bork P , Suyama M , Bailey JA , Portnoy ME , Torrents D , Chinwalla AT , Gish WR , Eddy SR , McPherson JD , Olson MV , Eichler EE , Green ED , Waterston RH , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 424 :157 , 2003
Abstract : Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame.
ESTHER : Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
PubMedID: 12853948
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-CPVL , human-DPP6 , human-MEST