Wilson RK

References (35)

Title : The Contribution of GWAS Loci in Familial Dyslipidemias - Ripatti_2016_PLoS.Genet_12_e1006078
Author(s) : Ripatti P , Ramo JT , Soderlund S , Surakka I , Matikainen N , Pirinen M , Pajukanta P , Sarin AP , Service SK , Laurila PP , Ehnholm C , Salomaa V , Wilson RK , Palotie A , Freimer NB , Taskinen MR , Ripatti S
Ref : PLoS Genet , 12 :e1006078 , 2016
Abstract : Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a complex and common familial dyslipidemia characterized by elevated total cholesterol and/or triglyceride levels with over five-fold risk of coronary heart disease. The genetic architecture and contribution of rare Mendelian and common variants to FCH susceptibility is unknown. In 53 Finnish FCH families, we genotyped and imputed nine million variants in 715 family members with DNA available. We studied the enrichment of variants previously implicated with monogenic dyslipidemias and/or lipid levels in the general population by comparing allele frequencies between the FCH families and population samples. We also constructed weighted polygenic scores using 212 lipid-associated SNPs and estimated the relative contributions of Mendelian variants and polygenic scores to the risk of FCH in the families. We identified, across the whole allele frequency spectrum, an enrichment of variants known to elevate, and a deficiency of variants known to lower LDL-C and/or TG levels among both probands and affected FCH individuals. The score based on TG associated SNPs was particularly high among affected individuals compared to non-affected family members. Out of 234 affected FCH individuals across the families, seven (3%) carried Mendelian variants and 83 (35%) showed high accumulation of either known LDL-C or TG elevating variants by having either polygenic score over the 90th percentile in the population. The positive predictive value of high score was much higher for affected FCH individuals than for similar sporadic cases in the population. FCH is highly polygenic, supporting the hypothesis that variants across the whole allele frequency spectrum contribute to this complex familial trait. Polygenic SNP panels improve identification of individuals affected with FCH, but their clinical utility remains to be defined.
ESTHER : Ripatti_2016_PLoS.Genet_12_e1006078
PubMedSearch : Ripatti_2016_PLoS.Genet_12_e1006078
PubMedID: 27227539
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-LIPC

Title : Genome of the house fly, Musca domestica L., a global vector of diseases with adaptations to a septic environment - Scott_2014_Genome.Biol_15_466
Author(s) : Scott JG , Warren WC , Beukeboom LW , Bopp D , Clark AG , Giers SD , Hediger M , Jones AK , Kasai S , Leichter CA , Li M , Meisel RP , Minx P , Murphy TD , Nelson DR , Reid WR , Rinkevich FD , Robertson HM , Sackton TB , Sattelle DB , Thibaud-Nissen F , Tomlinson C , van de Zande L , Walden KK , Wilson RK , Liu N
Ref : Genome Biol , 15 :466 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Adult house flies, Musca domestica L., are mechanical vectors of more than 100 devastating diseases that have severe consequences for human and animal health. House fly larvae play a vital role as decomposers of animal wastes, and thus live in intimate association with many animal pathogens. RESULTS: We have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the house fly using DNA from female flies. The sequenced genome is 691 Mb. Compared with Drosophila melanogaster, the genome contains a rich resource of shared and novel protein coding genes, a significantly higher amount of repetitive elements, and substantial increases in copy number and diversity of both the recognition and effector components of the immune system, consistent with life in a pathogen-rich environment. There are 146 P450 genes, plus 11 pseudogenes, in M. domestica, representing a significant increase relative to D. melanogaster and suggesting the presence of enhanced detoxification in house flies. Relative to D. melanogaster, M. domestica has also evolved an expanded repertoire of chemoreceptors and odorant binding proteins, many associated with gustation. CONCLUSIONS: This represents the first genome sequence of an insect that lives in intimate association with abundant animal pathogens. The house fly genome provides a rich resource for enabling work on innovative methods of insect control, for understanding the mechanisms of insecticide resistance, genetic adaptation to high pathogen loads, and for exploring the basic biology of this important pest. The genome of this species will also serve as a close out-group to Drosophila in comparative genomic studies.
ESTHER : Scott_2014_Genome.Biol_15_466
PubMedSearch : Scott_2014_Genome.Biol_15_466
PubMedID: 25315136
Gene_locus related to this paper: musdo-a0a1i8n2v5 , musdo-a0a1i8n5k8

Title : Genome of the human hookworm Necator americanus - Tang_2014_Nat.Genet_46_261
Author(s) : Tang YT , Gao X , Rosa BA , Abubucker S , Hallsworth-Pepin K , Martin J , Tyagi R , Heizer E , Zhang X , Bhonagiri-Palsikar V , Minx P , Warren WC , Wang Q , Zhan B , Hotez PJ , Sternberg PW , Dougall A , Gaze ST , Mulvenna J , Sotillo J , Ranganathan S , Rabelo EM , Wilson RK , Felgner PL , Bethony J , Hawdon JM , Gasser RB , Loukas A , Mitreva M
Ref : Nat Genet , 46 :261 , 2014
Abstract : The hookworm Necator americanus is the predominant soil-transmitted human parasite. Adult worms feed on blood in the small intestine, causing iron-deficiency anemia, malnutrition, growth and development stunting in children, and severe morbidity and mortality during pregnancy in women. We report sequencing and assembly of the N. americanus genome (244 Mb, 19,151 genes). Characterization of this first hookworm genome sequence identified genes orchestrating the hookworm's invasion of the human host, genes involved in blood feeding and development, and genes encoding proteins that represent new potential drug targets against hookworms. N. americanus has undergone a considerable and unique expansion of immunomodulator proteins, some of which we highlight as potential treatments against inflammatory diseases. We also used a protein microarray to demonstrate a postgenomic application of the hookworm genome sequence. This genome provides an invaluable resource to boost ongoing efforts toward fundamental and applied postgenomic research, including the development of new methods to control hookworm and human immunological diseases.
ESTHER : Tang_2014_Nat.Genet_46_261
PubMedSearch : Tang_2014_Nat.Genet_46_261
PubMedID: 24441737
Gene_locus related to this paper: necam-w2tsu7

Title : Elephant shark genome provides unique insights into gnathostome evolution - Venkatesh_2014_Nature_505_174
Author(s) : Venkatesh B , Lee AP , Ravi V , Maurya AK , Lian MM , Swann JB , Ohta Y , Flajnik MF , Sutoh Y , Kasahara M , Hoon S , Gangu V , Roy SW , Irimia M , Korzh V , Kondrychyn I , Lim ZW , Tay BH , Tohari S , Kong KW , Ho S , Lorente-Galdos B , Quilez J , Marques-Bonet T , Raney BJ , Ingham PW , Tay A , Hillier LW , Minx P , Boehm T , Wilson RK , Brenner S , Warren WC
Ref : Nature , 505 :174 , 2014
Abstract : The emergence of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) from jawless vertebrates was accompanied by major morphological and physiological innovations, such as hinged jaws, paired fins and immunoglobulin-based adaptive immunity. Gnathostomes subsequently diverged into two groups, the cartilaginous fishes and the bony vertebrates. Here we report the whole-genome analysis of a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). We find that the C. milii genome is the slowest evolving of all known vertebrates, including the 'living fossil' coelacanth, and features extensive synteny conservation with tetrapod genomes, making it a good model for comparative analyses of gnathostome genomes. Our functional studies suggest that the lack of genes encoding secreted calcium-binding phosphoproteins in cartilaginous fishes explains the absence of bone in their endoskeleton. Furthermore, the adaptive immune system of cartilaginous fishes is unusual: it lacks the canonical CD4 co-receptor and most transcription factors, cytokines and cytokine receptors related to the CD4 lineage, despite the presence of polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. It thus presents a new model for understanding the origin of adaptive immunity.
ESTHER : Venkatesh_2014_Nature_505_174
PubMedSearch : Venkatesh_2014_Nature_505_174
PubMedID: 24402279
Gene_locus related to this paper: calmi-ACHE , calmi-v9kt48 , calmi-v9kmb8 , calmi-v9kbr4 , calmi-v9kn25 , calmi-v9l873 , calmi-v9kkm2 , calmi-v9ku67 , calmi-v9ki62 , calmi-v9l0a5 , calmi-v9kuk3 , calmi-v9kdh1 , calmi-v9kas4 , calmi-v9keu1 , calmi-v9kj52 , calmi-v9kre8 , calmi-v9ki07 , calmi-v9kmn7 , calmi-a0a4w3h3v0 , calmi-a0a4w3hel5

Title : The genome of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, provides insights into evolutionary adaptation and several complex traits - Schartl_2013_Nat.Genet_45_567
Author(s) : Schartl M , Walter RB , Shen Y , Garcia T , Catchen J , Amores A , Braasch I , Chalopin D , Volff JN , Lesch KP , Bisazza A , Minx P , Hillier L , Wilson RK , Fuerstenberg S , Boore J , Searle S , Postlethwait JH , Warren WC
Ref : Nat Genet , 45 :567 , 2013
Abstract : Several attributes intuitively considered to be typical mammalian features, such as complex behavior, live birth and malignant disease such as cancer, also appeared several times independently in lower vertebrates. The genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of these elaborate traits are poorly understood. The platyfish, X. maculatus, offers a unique model to better understand the molecular biology of such traits. We report here the sequencing of the platyfish genome. Integrating genome assembly with extensive genetic maps identified an unexpected evolutionary stability of chromosomes in fish, in contrast to in mammals. Genes associated with viviparity show signatures of positive selection, identifying new putative functional domains and rare cases of parallel evolution. We also find that genes implicated in cognition show an unexpectedly high rate of duplicate gene retention after the teleost genome duplication event, suggesting a hypothesis for the evolution of the behavioral complexity in fish, which exceeds that found in amphibians and reptiles.
ESTHER : Schartl_2013_Nat.Genet_45_567
PubMedSearch : Schartl_2013_Nat.Genet_45_567
PubMedID: 23542700
Gene_locus related to this paper: xipma-m4a796 , xipma-a0a3b5r0c8 , xipma-m3zmg6 , xipma-m3zml4 , xipma-m4a704 , xipma-a0a3b5r3p5 , xipma-a0a3b5rfa0 , xipma-m3zns4 , xipma-m4a5i1 , xipma-m3zxe7 , xipma-a0a3b5r7u3 , xipma-m3zyp9 , xipma-m4a7a2 , xipma-m4a1z8 , xipma-a0a3b5qbj2 , xipma-m4azu0 , xipma-a0a3b5q4l7

Title : The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes - Swart_2013_PLoS.Biol_11_e1001473
Author(s) : Swart EC , Bracht JR , Magrini V , Minx P , Chen X , Zhou Y , Khurana JS , Goldman AD , Nowacki M , Schotanus K , Jung S , Fulton RS , Ly A , McGrath S , Haub K , Wiggins JL , Storton D , Matese JC , Parsons L , Chang WJ , Bowen MS , Stover NA , Jones TA , Eddy SR , Herrick GA , Doak TG , Wilson RK , Mardis ER , Landweber LF
Ref : PLoS Biol , 11 :e1001473 , 2013
Abstract : The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction ( approximately 5%) of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes), have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of approximately 2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of approximately 16,000 complete nanochromosomes ( approximately 50 Mb haploid genome size) that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean approximately 3.2 kb) and encode approximately 18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes approximately 10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is approximately 4.0%), suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb) suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing studies of rearrangements arising during evolution and disease.
ESTHER : Swart_2013_PLoS.Biol_11_e1001473
PubMedSearch : Swart_2013_PLoS.Biol_11_e1001473
PubMedID: 23382650
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9spit-j9j7j1 , 9spit-j9hp22 , 9spit-j9ivu0

Title : A lover and a fighter: the genome sequence of an entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora - Bai_2013_PLoS.One_8_e69618
Author(s) : Bai X , Adams BJ , Ciche TA , Clifton S , Gaugler R , Kim KS , Spieth J , Sternberg PW , Wilson RK , Grewal PS
Ref : PLoS ONE , 8 :e69618 , 2013
Abstract : Heterorhabditis bacteriophora are entomopathogenic nematodes that have evolved a mutualism with Photorhabdus luminescens bacteria to function as highly virulent insect pathogens. The nematode provides a safe harbor for intestinal symbionts in soil and delivers the symbiotic bacteria into the insect blood. The symbiont provides virulence and toxins, metabolites essential for nematode reproduction, and antibiotic preservation of the insect cadaver. Approximately half of the 21,250 putative protein coding genes identified in the 77 Mbp high quality draft H. bacteriophora genome sequence were novel proteins of unknown function lacking homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans or any other sequenced organisms. Similarly, 317 of the 603 predicted secreted proteins are novel with unknown function in addition to 19 putative peptidases, 9 peptidase inhibitors and 7 C-type lectins that may function in interactions with insect hosts or bacterial symbionts. The 134 proteins contained mariner transposase domains, of which there are none in C. elegans, suggesting an invasion and expansion of mariner transposons in H. bacteriophora. Fewer Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthologies in almost all metabolic categories were detected in the genome compared with 9 other sequenced nematode genomes, which may reflect dependence on the symbiont or insect host for these functions. The H. bacteriophora genome sequence will greatly facilitate genetics, genomics and evolutionary studies to gain fundamental knowledge of nematode parasitism and mutualism. It also elevates the utility of H. bacteriophora as a bridge species between vertebrate parasitic nematodes and the C. elegans model.
ESTHER : Bai_2013_PLoS.One_8_e69618
PubMedSearch : Bai_2013_PLoS.One_8_e69618
PubMedID: 23874975
Gene_locus related to this paper: hetba-a0a1i7xln9

Title : Oil palm genome sequence reveals divergence of interfertile species in Old and New worlds - Singh_2013_Nature_500_335
Author(s) : Singh R , Ong-Abdullah M , Low ET , Manaf MA , Rosli R , Nookiah R , Ooi LC , Ooi SE , Chan KL , Halim MA , Azizi N , Nagappan J , Bacher B , Lakey N , Smith SW , He D , Hogan M , Budiman MA , Lee EK , Desalle R , Kudrna D , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Wilson RK , Fulton RS , Ordway JM , Martienssen RA , Sambanthamurthi R
Ref : Nature , 500 :335 , 2013
Abstract : Oil palm is the most productive oil-bearing crop. Although it is planted on only 5% of the total world vegetable oil acreage, palm oil accounts for 33% of vegetable oil and 45% of edible oil worldwide, but increased cultivation competes with dwindling rainforest reserves. We report the 1.8-gigabase (Gb) genome sequence of the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, the predominant source of worldwide oil production. A total of 1.535 Gb of assembled sequence and transcriptome data from 30 tissue types were used to predict at least 34,802 genes, including oil biosynthesis genes and homologues of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), and other transcriptional regulators, which are highly expressed in the kernel. We also report the draft sequence of the South American oil palm Elaeis oleifera, which has the same number of chromosomes (2n = 32) and produces fertile interspecific hybrids with E. guineensis but seems to have diverged in the New World. Segmental duplications of chromosome arms define the palaeotetraploid origin of palm trees. The oil palm sequence enables the discovery of genes for important traits as well as somaclonal epigenetic alterations that restrict the use of clones in commercial plantings, and should therefore help to achieve sustainability for biofuels and edible oils, reducing the rainforest footprint of this tropical plantation crop.
ESTHER : Singh_2013_Nature_500_335
PubMedSearch : Singh_2013_Nature_500_335
PubMedID: 23883927
Gene_locus related to this paper: elagv-a0a6i9rtu7 , elagv-a0a6i9set9

Title : Insights into hominid evolution from the gorilla genome sequence - Scally_2012_Nature_483_169
Author(s) : Scally A , Dutheil JY , Hillier LW , Jordan GE , Goodhead I , Herrero J , Hobolth A , Lappalainen T , Mailund T , Marques-Bonet T , McCarthy S , Montgomery SH , Schwalie PC , Tang YA , Ward MC , Xue Y , Yngvadottir B , Alkan C , Andersen LN , Ayub Q , Ball EV , Beal K , Bradley BJ , Chen Y , Clee CM , Fitzgerald S , Graves TA , Gu Y , Heath P , Heger A , Karakoc E , Kolb-Kokocinski A , Laird GK , Lunter G , Meader S , Mort M , Mullikin JC , Munch K , O'Connor TD , Phillips AD , Prado-Martinez J , Rogers AS , Sajjadian S , Schmidt D , Shaw K , Simpson JT , Stenson PD , Turner DJ , Vigilant L , Vilella AJ , Whitener W , Zhu B , Cooper DN , de Jong P , Dermitzakis ET , Eichler EE , Flicek P , Goldman N , Mundy NI , Ning Z , Odom DT , Ponting CP , Quail MA , Ryder OA , Searle SM , Warren WC , Wilson RK , Schierup MH , Rogers J , Tyler-Smith C , Durbin R
Ref : Nature , 483 :169 , 2012
Abstract : Gorillas are humans' closest living relatives after chimpanzees, and are of comparable importance for the study of human origins and evolution. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a genome sequence for the western lowland gorilla, and compare the whole genomes of all extant great ape genera. We propose a synthesis of genetic and fossil evidence consistent with placing the human-chimpanzee and human-chimpanzee-gorilla speciation events at approximately 6 and 10 million years ago. In 30% of the genome, gorilla is closer to human or chimpanzee than the latter are to each other; this is rarer around coding genes, indicating pervasive selection throughout great ape evolution, and has functional consequences in gene expression. A comparison of protein coding genes reveals approximately 500 genes showing accelerated evolution on each of the gorilla, human and chimpanzee lineages, and evidence for parallel acceleration, particularly of genes involved in hearing. We also compare the western and eastern gorilla species, estimating an average sequence divergence time 1.75 million years ago, but with evidence for more recent genetic exchange and a population bottleneck in the eastern species. The use of the genome sequence in these and future analyses will promote a deeper understanding of great ape biology and evolution.
ESTHER : Scally_2012_Nature_483_169
PubMedSearch : Scally_2012_Nature_483_169
PubMedID: 22398555
Gene_locus related to this paper: gorgo-g3qfr8 , gorgo-g3qgi3 , gorgo-g3r1s1 , gorgo-g3r9p9 , gorgo-a0a2i2zrx6 , gorgo-g3re16 , gorgo-g3s122 , gorgo-a0a2i2y3x8

Title : A high-resolution map of human evolutionary constraint using 29 mammals - Lindblad-Toh_2011_Nature_478_476
Author(s) : Lindblad-Toh K , Garber M , Zuk O , Lin MF , Parker BJ , Washietl S , Kheradpour P , Ernst J , Jordan G , Mauceli E , Ward LD , Lowe CB , Holloway AK , Clamp M , Gnerre S , Alfoldi J , Beal K , Chang J , Clawson H , Cuff J , Di Palma F , Fitzgerald S , Flicek P , Guttman M , Hubisz MJ , Jaffe DB , Jungreis I , Kent WJ , Kostka D , Lara M , Martins AL , Massingham T , Moltke I , Raney BJ , Rasmussen MD , Robinson J , Stark A , Vilella AJ , Wen J , Xie X , Zody MC , Baldwin J , Bloom T , Chin CW , Heiman D , Nicol R , Nusbaum C , Young S , Wilkinson J , Worley KC , Kovar CL , Muzny DM , Gibbs RA , Cree A , Dihn HH , Fowler G , Jhangiani S , Joshi V , Lee S , Lewis LR , Nazareth LV , Okwuonu G , Santibanez J , Warren WC , Mardis ER , Weinstock GM , Wilson RK , Delehaunty K , Dooling D , Fronik C , Fulton L , Fulton B , Graves T , Minx P , Sodergren E , Birney E , Margulies EH , Herrero J , Green ED , Haussler D , Siepel A , Goldman N , Pollard KS , Pedersen JS , Lander ES , Kellis M
Ref : Nature , 478 :476 , 2011
Abstract : The comparison of related genomes has emerged as a powerful lens for genome interpretation. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of 29 eutherian genomes. We confirm that at least 5.5% of the human genome has undergone purifying selection, and locate constrained elements covering approximately 4.2% of the genome. We use evolutionary signatures and comparisons with experimental data sets to suggest candidate functions for approximately 60% of constrained bases. These elements reveal a small number of new coding exons, candidate stop codon readthrough events and over 10,000 regions of overlapping synonymous constraint within protein-coding exons. We find 220 candidate RNA structural families, and nearly a million elements overlapping potential promoter, enhancer and insulator regions. We report specific amino acid residues that have undergone positive selection, 280,000 non-coding elements exapted from mobile elements and more than 1,000 primate- and human-accelerated elements. Overlap with disease-associated variants indicates that our findings will be relevant for studies of human biology, health and disease.
ESTHER : Lindblad-Toh_2011_Nature_478_476
PubMedSearch : Lindblad-Toh_2011_Nature_478_476
PubMedID: 21993624
Gene_locus related to this paper: cavpo-1plip , cavpo-2plrp , cavpo-h0v1b7 , cavpo-h0v5v8 , cavpo-h0vj36 , cavpo-lipli , rabit-1hlip , rabit-1plip , rabit-g1t6x7 , rabit-LIPH , myolu-l7n1c2 , myolu-g1pqd9 , cavpo-h0uyz6 , cavpo-h0vi56 , rabit-g1tbj4 , myolu-g1p5c0 , rabit-g1sds3 , rabit-g1sye0 , cavpo-h0v0r2 , cavpo-h0v7s5 , rabit-g1sp43 , myolu-g1p4p3 , cavpo-h0vw09 , rabit-g1ssu3 , myolu-g1pds0 , rabit-g1sic4 , cavpo-h0v2c4 , myolu-g1pg61 , myolu-g1pnb1 , myolu-g1pu06 , myolu-g1qa15 , myolu-g1qfu0 , rabit-g1sn99 , rabit-g1snq9 , rabit-g1sns7 , rabit-g1tuu8 , rabit-g1tzq7 , cavpo-h0v2i2 , cavpo-h0v2j0 , cavpo-h0vsf5 , cavpo-a0a286x8d3 , cavpo-a0a286xbr3 , cavpo-a0a286y0i8 , cavpo-a0a286y4p3 , myolu-g1q2n9 , cavpo-h0v1p4 , myolu-g1pan8 , myolu-g1paq0 , myolu-g1par4 , myolu-g1prn3 , myolu-g1q3i0 , myolu-g1q463 , myolu-g1pat6 , myolu-g1q859 , rabit-g1sul9 , rabit-g1sun0 , rabit-g1sup0 , myolu-l7n125 , myolu-g1pan2 , rabit-g1sxd0 , cavpo-h0v8j4 , rabit-d5fit0 , rabit-g1tkr5 , myolu-g1nty6 , myolu-g1p1p3 , cavpo-h0vdd5 , myolu-g1pdp2 , rabit-g1tmm5 , cavpo-h0vhq3 , myolu-g1nth4 , cavpo-h0vqx6 , rabit-g1tqr7 , myolu-g1p1e9 , cavpo-h0v8y6 , rabit-g1skt3 , myolu-g1nzg3 , cavpo-h0v5z0 , rabit-g1sgz5 , myolu-g1pkg5 , rabit-g1tmw5 , rabit-g1t134 , cavpo-a0a286x9v5 , myolu-g1qc57 , myolu-g1q061 , rabit-g1tnp4 , rabit-g1tyf7 , cavpo-h0w2w1 , rabit-g1ta36 , cavpo-h0w342 , myolu-g1q4e3 , rabit-g1sqa1 , cavpo-h0uxk7 , myolu-g1p353 , cavpo-h0vpm0 , rabit-a0a5f9cru6 , cavpo-a0a286xtc0

Title : The draft genome of the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis - Mitreva_2011_Nat.Genet_43_228
Author(s) : Mitreva M , Jasmer DP , Zarlenga DS , Wang Z , Abubucker S , Martin J , Taylor CM , Yin Y , Fulton L , Minx P , Yang SP , Warren WC , Fulton RS , Bhonagiri V , Zhang X , Hallsworth-Pepin K , Clifton SW , McCarter JP , Appleton J , Mardis ER , Wilson RK
Ref : Nat Genet , 43 :228 , 2011
Abstract : Genome evolution studies for the phylum Nematoda have been limited by focusing on comparisons involving Caenorhabditis elegans. We report a draft genome sequence of Trichinella spiralis, a food-borne zoonotic parasite, which is the most common cause of human trichinellosis. This parasitic nematode is an extant member of a clade that diverged early in the evolution of the phylum, enabling identification of archetypical genes and molecular signatures exclusive to nematodes. We sequenced the 64-Mb nuclear genome, which is estimated to contain 15,808 protein-coding genes, at approximately 35-fold coverage using whole-genome shotgun and hierarchal map-assisted sequencing. Comparative genome analyses support intrachromosomal rearrangements across the phylum, disproportionate numbers of protein family deaths over births in parasitic compared to a non-parasitic nematode and a preponderance of gene-loss and -gain events in nematodes relative to Drosophila melanogaster. This genome sequence and the identified pan-phylum characteristics will contribute to genome evolution studies of Nematoda as well as strategies to combat global parasites of humans, food animals and crops.
ESTHER : Mitreva_2011_Nat.Genet_43_228
PubMedSearch : Mitreva_2011_Nat.Genet_43_228
PubMedID: 21336279
Gene_locus related to this paper: trisp-ACHE1 , trisp-e5ryh1 , trisp-e5s2p1 , trisp-e5s3s1 , trisp-e5s5l6 , trisp-e5s7y8 , trisp-e5s8m6 , trisp-e5s9j3 , trisp-e5s254 , trisp-e5s773 , trisp-e5sav1 , trisp-e5sbp4 , trisp-e5sgg4 , trisp-e5sgu8 , trisp-e5snw0 , trisp-e5sr61 , trisp-e5ss42 , trisp-e5sgh2 , 9bila-a0a0v0tgw4.1 , 9bila-a0a0v0tws5

Title : Genome sequence of Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 and comparative genomic hybridization analysis with other Cronobacter species - Kucerova_2010_PLoS.One_5_e9556
Author(s) : Kucerova E , Clifton SW , Xia XQ , Long F , Porwollik S , Fulton L , Fronick C , Minx P , Kyung K , Warren W , Fulton R , Feng D , Wollam A , Shah N , Bhonagiri V , Nash WE , Hallsworth-Pepin K , Wilson RK , McClelland M , Forsythe SJ
Ref : PLoS ONE , 5 :e9556 , 2010
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The genus Cronobacter (formerly called Enterobacter sakazakii) is composed of five species; C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis, C. muytjensii, and C. dublinensis. The genus includes opportunistic human pathogens, and the first three species have been associated with neonatal infections. The most severe diseases are caused in neonates and include fatal necrotizing enterocolitis and meningitis. The genetic basis of the diversity within the genus is unknown, and few virulence traits have been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first sequence of a member of this genus, C. sakazakii strain BAA-894. The genome of Cronobacter sakazakii strain BAA-894 comprises a 4.4 Mb chromosome (57% GC content) and two plasmids; 31 kb (51% GC) and 131 kb (56% GC). The genome was used to construct a 387,000 probe oligonucleotide tiling DNA microarray covering the whole genome. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was undertaken on five other C. sakazakii strains, and representatives of the four other Cronobacter species. Among 4,382 annotated genes inspected in this study, about 55% of genes were common to all C. sakazakii strains and 43% were common to all Cronobacter strains, with 10-17% absence of genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CGH highlighted 15 clusters of genes in C. sakazakii BAA-894 that were divergent or absent in more than half of the tested strains; six of these are of probable prophage origin. Putative virulence factors were identified in these prophage and in other variable regions. A number of genes unique to Cronobacter species associated with neonatal infections (C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus and C. turicensis) were identified. These included a copper and silver resistance system known to be linked to invasion of the blood-brain barrier by neonatal meningitic strains of Escherichia coli. In addition, genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps and adhesins were identified that were unique to C. sakazakii strains from outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units.
ESTHER : Kucerova_2010_PLoS.One_5_e9556
PubMedSearch : Kucerova_2010_PLoS.One_5_e9556
PubMedID: 20221447
Gene_locus related to this paper: cros8-a7men1 , cros8-a7mft0 , 9entr-k7zz64

Title : The genome of the Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis - Hellsten_2010_Science_328_633
Author(s) : Hellsten U , Harland RM , Gilchrist MJ , Hendrix D , Jurka J , Kapitonov V , Ovcharenko I , Putnam NH , Shu S , Taher L , Blitz IL , Blumberg B , Dichmann DS , Dubchak I , Amaya E , Detter JC , Fletcher R , Gerhard DS , Goodstein D , Graves T , Grigoriev IV , Grimwood J , Kawashima T , Lindquist E , Lucas SM , Mead PE , Mitros T , Ogino H , Ohta Y , Poliakov AV , Pollet N , Robert J , Salamov A , Sater AK , Schmutz J , Terry A , Vize PD , Warren WC , Wells D , Wills A , Wilson RK , Zimmerman LB , Zorn AM , Grainger R , Grammer T , Khokha MK , Richardson PM , Rokhsar DS
Ref : Science , 328 :633 , 2010
Abstract : The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1700 human disease genes. Over 1 million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like that of other tetrapods, the genome of X. tropicalis contains gene deserts enriched for conserved noncoding elements. The genome exhibits substantial shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.
ESTHER : Hellsten_2010_Science_328_633
PubMedSearch : Hellsten_2010_Science_328_633
PubMedID: 20431018
Gene_locus related to this paper: xenla-q6pcj9 , xentr-a9umk0 , xentr-abhdb , xentr-ACHE , xentr-b0bm77 , xentr-b1h0y7 , xentr-b2guc4 , xentr-b7zt03 , xentr-b7ztj4 , xentr-BCHE1 , xentr-BCHE2 , xentr-cxest2 , xentr-d2x2k4 , xentr-d2x2k6 , xentr-f6rff6 , xentr-f6v0g3 , xentr-f6v2j6 , xentr-f6v3z1 , xentr-f6y4c8 , xentr-f6yve5 , xentr-f7a4y9 , xentr-f7acc5 , xentr-f7e2e2 , xentr-LOC394897 , xentr-ndrg1 , xentr-q0vfb6 , xentr-f7cpl7 , xentr-f6yj44 , xentr-f7ejk4 , xentr-f6q8j8 , xentr-f6z8f0 , xentr-f7d709 , xentr-b0bmb8 , xentr-f7af63 , xentr-a0a1b8y2w9 , xentr-f7d4k9 , xentr-f6r032 , xentr-f6yvq3 , xentr-a0a1b8y2z3 , xentr-f7afg4 , xentr-f6xb15 , xentr-f7e1r2 , xentr-a4ihf1 , xentr-f7eue5 , xentr-f6u7u3 , xentr-f172a , xentr-f7equ8 , xentr-f7dd89 , xentr-a9jtx5

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx

Title : The genome of a songbird - Warren_2010_Nature_464_757
Author(s) : Warren WC , Clayton DF , Ellegren H , Arnold AP , Hillier LW , Kunstner A , Searle S , White S , Vilella AJ , Fairley S , Heger A , Kong L , Ponting CP , Jarvis ED , Mello CV , Minx P , Lovell P , Velho TA , Ferris M , Balakrishnan CN , Sinha S , Blatti C , London SE , Li Y , Lin YC , George J , Sweedler J , Southey B , Gunaratne P , Watson M , Nam K , Backstrom N , Smeds L , Nabholz B , Itoh Y , Whitney O , Pfenning AR , Howard J , Volker M , Skinner BM , Griffin DK , Ye L , McLaren WM , Flicek P , Quesada V , Velasco G , Lopez-Otin C , Puente XS , Olender T , Lancet D , Smit AF , Hubley R , Konkel MK , Walker JA , Batzer MA , Gu W , Pollock DD , Chen L , Cheng Z , Eichler EE , Stapley J , Slate J , Ekblom R , Birkhead T , Burke T , Burt D , Scharff C , Adam I , Richard H , Sultan M , Soldatov A , Lehrach H , Edwards SV , Yang SP , Li X , Graves T , Fulton L , Nelson J , Chinwalla A , Hou S , Mardis ER , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 464 :757 , 2010
Abstract : The zebra finch is an important model organism in several fields with unique relevance to human neuroscience. Like other songbirds, the zebra finch communicates through learned vocalizations, an ability otherwise documented only in humans and a few other animals and lacking in the chicken-the only bird with a sequenced genome until now. Here we present a structural, functional and comparative analysis of the genome sequence of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), which is a songbird belonging to the large avian order Passeriformes. We find that the overall structures of the genomes are similar in zebra finch and chicken, but they differ in many intrachromosomal rearrangements, lineage-specific gene family expansions, the number of long-terminal-repeat-based retrotransposons, and mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation. We show that song behaviour engages gene regulatory networks in the zebra finch brain, altering the expression of long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, transcription factors and their targets. We also show evidence for rapid molecular evolution in the songbird lineage of genes that are regulated during song experience. These results indicate an active involvement of the genome in neural processes underlying vocal communication and identify potential genetic substrates for the evolution and regulation of this behaviour.
ESTHER : Warren_2010_Nature_464_757
PubMedSearch : Warren_2010_Nature_464_757
PubMedID: 20360741
Gene_locus related to this paper: taegu-b5fyu7 , taegu-BCHE , taegu-h0z4h9 , taegu-h0z9w8 , taegu-h0zat6 , taegu-h0ze48 , taegu-h0zha8 , taegu-h0zkr8 , taegu-h0zqp3 , taegu-h0zz82 , taegu-h0zqs1 , taegu-h0yy64 , taegu-h0yv40 , taegu-h0yyt1 , taegu-h0zcc8 , taegu-h0z3k5 , taegu-h0yw95 , taegu-h0zkm7 , taegu-h1a198 , taegu-h0z6w2 , taegu-h0zl93 , taegu-h0zt33 , taegu-h0yp71 , taegu-h0ypu5 , taegu-h1a048 , taegu-h0ztq1 , fical-u3kau2 , 9pass-a0a093qu66 , taegu-h0z7g0 , fical-u3jnn0 , taegu-h0zb80 , taegu-h0zb89 , taegu-h0z994 , taegu-h0ztj6

Title : The B73 maize genome: complexity, diversity, and dynamics - Schnable_2009_Science_326_1112
Author(s) : Schnable PS , Ware D , Fulton RS , Stein JC , Wei F , Pasternak S , Liang C , Zhang J , Fulton L , Graves TA , Minx P , Reily AD , Courtney L , Kruchowski SS , Tomlinson C , Strong C , Delehaunty K , Fronick C , Courtney B , Rock SM , Belter E , Du F , Kim K , Abbott RM , Cotton M , Levy A , Marchetto P , Ochoa K , Jackson SM , Gillam B , Chen W , Yan L , Higginbotham J , Cardenas M , Waligorski J , Applebaum E , Phelps L , Falcone J , Kanchi K , Thane T , Scimone A , Thane N , Henke J , Wang T , Ruppert J , Shah N , Rotter K , Hodges J , Ingenthron E , Cordes M , Kohlberg S , Sgro J , Delgado B , Mead K , Chinwalla A , Leonard S , Crouse K , Collura K , Kudrna D , Currie J , He R , Angelova A , Rajasekar S , Mueller T , Lomeli R , Scara G , Ko A , Delaney K , Wissotski M , Lopez G , Campos D , Braidotti M , Ashley E , Golser W , Kim H , Lee S , Lin J , Dujmic Z , Kim W , Talag J , Zuccolo A , Fan C , Sebastian A , Kramer M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Zutavern T , Miller B , Ambroise C , Muller S , Spooner W , Narechania A , Ren L , Wei S , Kumari S , Faga B , Levy MJ , McMahan L , Van Buren P , Vaughn MW , Ying K , Yeh CT , Emrich SJ , Jia Y , Kalyanaraman A , Hsia AP , Barbazuk WB , Baucom RS , Brutnell TP , Carpita NC , Chaparro C , Chia JM , Deragon JM , Estill JC , Fu Y , Jeddeloh JA , Han Y , Lee H , Li P , Lisch DR , Liu S , Liu Z , Nagel DH , McCann MC , SanMiguel P , Myers AM , Nettleton D , Nguyen J , Penning BW , Ponnala L , Schneider KL , Schwartz DC , Sharma A , Soderlund C , Springer NM , Sun Q , Wang H , Waterman M , Westerman R , Wolfgruber TK , Yang L , Yu Y , Zhang L , Zhou S , Zhu Q , Bennetzen JL , Dawe RK , Jiang J , Jiang N , Presting GG , Wessler SR , Aluru S , Martienssen RA , Clifton SW , McCombie WR , Wing RA , Wilson RK
Ref : Science , 326 :1112 , 2009
Abstract : We report an improved draft nucleotide sequence of the 2.3-gigabase genome of maize, an important crop plant and model for biological research. Over 32,000 genes were predicted, of which 99.8% were placed on reference chromosomes. Nearly 85% of the genome is composed of hundreds of families of transposable elements, dispersed nonuniformly across the genome. These were responsible for the capture and amplification of numerous gene fragments and affect the composition, sizes, and positions of centromeres. We also report on the correlation of methylation-poor regions with Mu transposon insertions and recombination, and copy number variants with insertions and/or deletions, as well as how uneven gene losses between duplicated regions were involved in returning an ancient allotetraploid to a genetically diploid state. These analyses inform and set the stage for further investigations to improve our understanding of the domestication and agricultural improvements of maize.
ESTHER : Schnable_2009_Science_326_1112
PubMedSearch : Schnable_2009_Science_326_1112
PubMedID: 19965430
Gene_locus related to this paper: maize-b4ffc7 , maize-b6u7e1 , maize-c0pcy5 , maize-c0pgf7 , maize-c0pgw1 , maize-c0pfl3 , maize-b4fpr7 , maize-k7vy73 , maize-a0a096swr3 , maize-k7v3i9 , maize-b6u9v9 , maize-a0a3l6e780 , maize-b4fv80 , maize-a0a1d6nse2 , maize-c4j9a1 , maize-k7uba1

Title : Characterizing a model human gut microbiota composed of members of its two dominant bacterial phyla - Mahowald_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_5859
Author(s) : Mahowald MA , Rey FE , Seedorf H , Turnbaugh PJ , Fulton RS , Wollam A , Shah N , Wang C , Magrini V , Wilson RK , Cantarel BL , Coutinho PM , Henrissat B , Crock LW , Russell A , VerBerkmoes NC , Hettich RL , Gordon JI
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 106 :5859 , 2009
Abstract : The adult human distal gut microbial community is typically dominated by 2 bacterial phyla (divisions), the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes. Little is known about the factors that govern the interactions between their members. Here, we examine the niches of representatives of both phyla in vivo. Finished genome sequences were generated from Eubacterium rectale and E. eligens, which belong to Clostridium Cluster XIVa, one of the most common gut Firmicute clades. Comparison of these and 25 other gut Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes indicated that the Firmicutes possess smaller genomes and a disproportionately smaller number of glycan-degrading enzymes. Germ-free mice were then colonized with E. rectale and/or a prominent human gut Bacteroidetes, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, followed by whole-genome transcriptional profiling, high-resolution proteomic analysis, and biochemical assays of microbial-microbial and microbial-host interactions. B. thetaiotaomicron adapts to E. rectale by up-regulating expression of a variety of polysaccharide utilization loci encoding numerous glycoside hydrolases, and by signaling the host to produce mucosal glycans that it, but not E. rectale, can access. E. rectale adapts to B. thetaiotaomicron by decreasing production of its glycan-degrading enzymes, increasing expression of selected amino acid and sugar transporters, and facilitating glycolysis by reducing levels of NADH, in part via generation of butyrate from acetate, which in turn is used by the gut epithelium. This simplified model of the human gut microbiota illustrates niche specialization and functional redundancy within members of its major bacterial phyla, and the importance of host glycans as a nutrient foundation that ensures ecosystem stability.
ESTHER : Mahowald_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_5859
PubMedSearch : Mahowald_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_5859
PubMedID: 19321416
Gene_locus related to this paper: eube2-c4z2j4 , eube2-c4z5d5 , eube2-c4z6k4 , eube2-c4z179 , eube2-c4z180 , eubr3-c4z8a6 , eubr3-c4zfm2 , eubr3-c4zhp3 , eubr3-c4zf28

Title : Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution - Warren_2008_Nature_453_175
Author(s) : Warren WC , Hillier LW , Marshall Graves JA , Birney E , Ponting CP , Grutzner F , Belov K , Miller W , Clarke L , Chinwalla AT , Yang SP , Heger A , Locke DP , Miethke P , Waters PD , Veyrunes F , Fulton L , Fulton B , Graves T , Wallis J , Puente XS , Lopez-Otin C , Ordonez GR , Eichler EE , Chen L , Cheng Z , Deakin JE , Alsop A , Thompson K , Kirby P , Papenfuss AT , Wakefield MJ , Olender T , Lancet D , Huttley GA , Smit AF , Pask A , Temple-Smith P , Batzer MA , Walker JA , Konkel MK , Harris RS , Whittington CM , Wong ES , Gemmell NJ , Buschiazzo E , Vargas Jentzsch IM , Merkel A , Schmitz J , Zemann A , Churakov G , Kriegs JO , Brosius J , Murchison EP , Sachidanandam R , Smith C , Hannon GJ , Tsend-Ayush E , McMillan D , Attenborough R , Rens W , Ferguson-Smith M , Lefevre CM , Sharp JA , Nicholas KR , Ray DA , Kube M , Reinhardt R , Pringle TH , Taylor J , Jones RC , Nixon B , Dacheux JL , Niwa H , Sekita Y , Huang X , Stark A , Kheradpour P , Kellis M , Flicek P , Chen Y , Webber C , Hardison R , Nelson J , Hallsworth-Pepin K , Delehaunty K , Markovic C , Minx P , Feng Y , Kremitzki C , Mitreva M , Glasscock J , Wylie T , Wohldmann P , Thiru P , Nhan MN , Pohl CS , Smith SM , Hou S , Nefedov M , de Jong PJ , Renfree MB , Mardis ER , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 453 :175 , 2008
Abstract : We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation.
ESTHER : Warren_2008_Nature_453_175
PubMedSearch : Warren_2008_Nature_453_175
PubMedID: 18464734
Gene_locus related to this paper: ornan-f6s0q0 , ornan-f6ty74 , ornan-f6u2k2 , ornan-f6uve1 , ornan-f6vpb6 , ornan-f6ybp3 , ornan-f7bgu8 , ornan-f7ct41 , ornan-f7cza1 , ornan-f7ejp8 , ornan-f7exu1 , ornan-f7f392 , ornan-f7f9y6 , ornan-f6ve87 , ornan-f7f1d9 , ornan-f6z3l1 , ornan-f6r3f9 , ornan-f6r3g8 , ornan-f6vs71 , ornan-f7g4v8

Title : The genome of Cyanothece 51142, a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium important in the marine nitrogen cycle - Welsh_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_15094
Author(s) : Welsh EA , Liberton M , Stockel J , Loh T , Elvitigala T , Wang C , Wollam A , Fulton RS , Clifton SW , Jacobs JM , Aurora R , Ghosh BK , Sherman LA , Smith RD , Wilson RK , Pakrasi HB
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 105 :15094 , 2008
Abstract : Unicellular cyanobacteria have recently been recognized for their contributions to nitrogen fixation in marine environments, a function previously thought to be filled mainly by filamentous cyanobacteria such as Trichodesmium. To begin a systems level analysis of the physiology of the unicellular N(2)-fixing microbes, we have sequenced to completion the genome of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, the first such organism. Cyanothece 51142 performs oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, separating these two incompatible processes temporally within the same cell, while concomitantly accumulating metabolic products in inclusion bodies that are later mobilized as part of a robust diurnal cycle. The 5,460,377-bp Cyanothece 51142 genome has a unique arrangement of one large circular chromosome, four small plasmids, and one linear chromosome, the first report of a linear element in the genome of a photosynthetic bacterium. On the 429,701-bp linear chromosome is a cluster of genes for enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism, suggesting an important role for the linear chromosome in fermentative processes. The annotation of the genome was significantly aided by simultaneous global proteomic studies of this organism. Compared with other nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, Cyanothece 51142 contains the largest intact contiguous cluster of nitrogen fixation-related genes. We discuss the implications of such an organization on the regulation of nitrogen fixation. The genome sequence provides important information regarding the ability of Cyanothece 51142 to accomplish metabolic compartmentalization and energy storage, as well as how a unicellular bacterium balances multiple, often incompatible, processes in a single cell.
ESTHER : Welsh_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_15094
PubMedSearch : Welsh_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_15094
PubMedID: 18812508
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9chro-a3ivg5 , cyaa5-b1wnj9 , cyaa5-b1wp98 , cyaa5-b1wq26 , cyaa5-b1wra6 , cyaa5-b1wrh9 , cyaa5-b1wrp1 , cyaa5-b1wt43 , cyaa5-b1wuj8 , cyaa5-b1wuq3 , cyaa5-b1wvl2 , cyaa5-b1wwy9 , cyaa5-b1wxa5 , cyaa5-b1wxy0 , cyaa5-b1wyh5 , cyaa5-b1wzi4 , cyaa5-b1x044 , cyaa5-b1x046 , cyaa5-b1x242 , cyaa5-b1x271 , cyaa5-b1wzg4 , cyaa5-b1x2s9

Title : The Pristionchus pacificus genome provides a unique perspective on nematode lifestyle and parasitism - Dieterich_2008_Nat.Genet_40_1193
Author(s) : Dieterich C , Clifton SW , Schuster LN , Chinwalla A , Delehaunty K , Dinkelacker I , Fulton L , Fulton R , Godfrey J , Minx P , Mitreva M , Roeseler W , Tian H , Witte H , Yang SP , Wilson RK , Sommer RJ
Ref : Nat Genet , 40 :1193 , 2008
Abstract : Here we present a draft genome sequence of the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, a species that is associated with beetles and is used as a model system in evolutionary biology. With 169 Mb and 23,500 predicted protein-coding genes, the P. pacificus genome is larger than those of Caenorhabditis elegans and the human parasite Brugia malayi. Compared to C. elegans, the P. pacificus genome has more genes encoding cytochrome P450 enzymes, glucosyltransferases, sulfotransferases and ABC transporters, many of which were experimentally validated. The P. pacificus genome contains genes encoding cellulase and diapausin, and cellulase activity is found in P. pacificus secretions, indicating that cellulases can be found in nematodes beyond plant parasites. The relatively higher number of detoxification and degradation enzymes in P. pacificus is consistent with its necromenic lifestyle and might represent a preadaptation for parasitism. Thus, comparative genomics analysis of three ecologically distinct nematodes offers a unique opportunity to investigate the association between genome structure and lifestyle.
ESTHER : Dieterich_2008_Nat.Genet_40_1193
PubMedSearch : Dieterich_2008_Nat.Genet_40_1193
PubMedID: 18806794
Gene_locus related to this paper: pripa-h3dz72 , pripa-h3dzd7 , pripa-h3epg7 , pripa-h3ept4 , pripa-h3ept8 , pripa-h3ew78 , pripa-h3ext9 , pripa-h3f0j4 , pripa-h3f919 , pripa-h3f920 , pripa-h3fcj7 , pripa-h3fg45 , pripa-h3fg46 , pripa-h3fg51.2 , pripa-h3fhh1 , pripa-h3fhv6 , pripa-h3fig0 , pripa-h3fj25 , pripa-h3fvb4 , pripa-h3g1q9 , pripa-h3g217 , pripa-a0a0f5cf17 , pripa-a0a0f5crg5 , pripa-a0a0f5csq7 , pripa-h3esz7 , pripa-a0a0f5chi5 , pripa-h3fh18 , pripa-h3dzn5

Title : Evolution of symbiotic bacteria in the distal human intestine - Xu_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e156
Author(s) : Xu J , Mahowald MA , Ley RE , Lozupone CA , Hamady M , Martens EC , Henrissat B , Coutinho PM , Minx P , Latreille P , Cordum H , Van Brunt A , Kim K , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Clifton SW , Wilson RK , Knight RD , Gordon JI
Ref : PLoS Biol , 5 :e156 , 2007
Abstract : The adult human intestine contains trillions of bacteria, representing hundreds of species and thousands of subspecies. Little is known about the selective pressures that have shaped and are shaping this community's component species, which are dominated by members of the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes divisions. To examine how the intestinal environment affects microbial genome evolution, we have sequenced the genomes of two members of the normal distal human gut microbiota, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides distasonis, and by comparison with the few other sequenced gut and non-gut Bacteroidetes, analyzed their niche and habitat adaptations. The results show that lateral gene transfer, mobile elements, and gene amplification have played important roles in affecting the ability of gut-dwelling Bacteroidetes to vary their cell surface, sense their environment, and harvest nutrient resources present in the distal intestine. Our findings show that these processes have been a driving force in the adaptation of Bacteroidetes to the distal gut environment, and emphasize the importance of considering the evolution of humans from an additional perspective, namely the evolution of our microbiomes.
ESTHER : Xu_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e156
PubMedSearch : Xu_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e156
PubMedID: 17579514
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9bace-b6w170 , 9bace-c6z6f2 , 9bace-e1z049 , 9porp-c7xbp3 , 9porp-c7xci2 , 9porp-c7xdx2 , bacv8-a6kwf6 , bacv8-a6kzc1 , bacv8-a6kze8 , bacv8-a6l0d9 , bacv8-a6l1d0 , bacv8-a6l1u9 , bacv8-a6l7p9 , bacv8-a6l7w1 , bacv8-a6l018 , bacv8-a6l378 , bacv8-a6l415 , bacv8-a6l715 , pard8-a6lc23 , pard8-a6lca7 , pard8-a6ld87 , pard8-a6le10 , pard8-a6le63 , pard8-a6lfj2 , pard8-a6lgh2 , pard8-a6lgi6 , pard8-a6lgn7 , pard8-a6lhe1 , pard8-a6li91 , bacv8-a6l3w9

Title : Genomic and metabolic adaptations of Methanobrevibacter smithii to the human gut - Samuel_2007_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_104_10643
Author(s) : Samuel BS , Hansen EE , Manchester JK , Coutinho PM , Henrissat B , Fulton R , Latreille P , Kim K , Wilson RK , Gordon JI
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 104 :10643 , 2007
Abstract : The human gut is home to trillions of microbes, thousands of bacterial phylotypes, as well as hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Studies in gnotobiotic mice indicate that Methanobrevibacter smithii, the dominant archaeon in the human gut ecosystem, affects the specificity and efficiency of bacterial digestion of dietary polysaccharides, thereby influencing host calorie harvest and adiposity. Metagenomic studies of the gut microbial communities of genetically obese mice and their lean littermates have shown that the former contain an enhanced representation of genes involved in polysaccharide degradation, possess more archaea, and exhibit a greater capacity to promote adiposity when transplanted into germ-free recipients. These findings have led to the hypothesis that M. smithii may be a therapeutic target for reducing energy harvest in obese humans. To explore this possibility, we have sequenced its 1,853,160-bp genome and compared it to other human gut-associated M. smithii strains and other Archaea. We have also examined M. smithii's transcriptome and metabolome in gnotobiotic mice that do or do not harbor Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a prominent saccharolytic bacterial member of our gut microbiota. Our results indicate that M. smithii is well equipped to persist in the distal intestine through (i) production of surface glycans resembling those found in the gut mucosa, (ii) regulated expression of adhesin-like proteins, (iii) consumption of a variety of fermentation products produced by saccharolytic bacteria, and (iv) effective competition for nitrogenous nutrient pools. These findings provide a framework for designing strategies to change the representation and/or properties of M. smithii in the human gut microbiota.
ESTHER : Samuel_2007_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_104_10643
PubMedSearch : Samuel_2007_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_104_10643
PubMedID: 17563350
Gene_locus related to this paper: mets3-a5ujk2 , metsm-d2zrn4

Title : Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny - Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
Author(s) : Clark AG , Eisen MB , Smith DR , Bergman CM , Oliver B , Markow TA , Kaufman TC , Kellis M , Gelbart W , Iyer VN , Pollard DA , Sackton TB , Larracuente AM , Singh ND , Abad JP , Abt DN , Adryan B , Aguade M , Akashi H , Anderson WW , Aquadro CF , Ardell DH , Arguello R , Artieri CG , Barbash DA , Barker D , Barsanti P , Batterham P , Batzoglou S , Begun D , Bhutkar A , Blanco E , Bosak SA , Bradley RK , Brand AD , Brent MR , Brooks AN , Brown RH , Butlin RK , Caggese C , Calvi BR , Bernardo de Carvalho A , Caspi A , Castrezana S , Celniker SE , Chang JL , Chapple C , Chatterji S , Chinwalla A , Civetta A , Clifton SW , Comeron JM , Costello JC , Coyne JA , Daub J , David RG , Delcher AL , Delehaunty K , Do CB , Ebling H , Edwards K , Eickbush T , Evans JD , Filipski A , Findeiss S , Freyhult E , Fulton L , Fulton R , Garcia AC , Gardiner A , Garfield DA , Garvin BE , Gibson G , Gilbert D , Gnerre S , Godfrey J , Good R , Gotea V , Gravely B , Greenberg AJ , Griffiths-Jones S , Gross S , Guigo R , Gustafson EA , Haerty W , Hahn MW , Halligan DL , Halpern AL , Halter GM , Han MV , Heger A , Hillier L , Hinrichs AS , Holmes I , Hoskins RA , Hubisz MJ , Hultmark D , Huntley MA , Jaffe DB , Jagadeeshan S , Jeck WR , Johnson J , Jones CD , Jordan WC , Karpen GH , Kataoka E , Keightley PD , Kheradpour P , Kirkness EF , Koerich LB , Kristiansen K , Kudrna D , Kulathinal RJ , Kumar S , Kwok R , Lander E , Langley CH , Lapoint R , Lazzaro BP , Lee SJ , Levesque L , Li R , Lin CF , Lin MF , Lindblad-Toh K , Llopart A , Long M , Low L , Lozovsky E , Lu J , Luo M , Machado CA , Makalowski W , Marzo M , Matsuda M , Matzkin L , McAllister B , McBride CS , McKernan B , McKernan K , Mendez-Lago M , Minx P , Mollenhauer MU , Montooth K , Mount SM , Mu X , Myers E , Negre B , Newfeld S , Nielsen R , Noor MA , O'Grady P , Pachter L , Papaceit M , Parisi MJ , Parisi M , Parts L , Pedersen JS , Pesole G , Phillippy AM , Ponting CP , Pop M , Porcelli D , Powell JR , Prohaska S , Pruitt K , Puig M , Quesneville H , Ram KR , Rand D , Rasmussen MD , Reed LK , Reenan R , Reily A , Remington KA , Rieger TT , Ritchie MG , Robin C , Rogers YH , Rohde C , Rozas J , Rubenfield MJ , Ruiz A , Russo S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez-Gracia A , Saranga DJ , Sato H , Schaeffer SW , Schatz MC , Schlenke T , Schwartz R , Segarra C , Singh RS , Sirot L , Sirota M , Sisneros NB , Smith CD , Smith TF , Spieth J , Stage DE , Stark A , Stephan W , Strausberg RL , Strempel S , Sturgill D , Sutton G , Sutton GG , Tao W , Teichmann S , Tobari YN , Tomimura Y , Tsolas JM , Valente VL , Venter E , Venter JC , Vicario S , Vieira FG , Vilella AJ , Villasante A , Walenz B , Wang J , Wasserman M , Watts T , Wilson D , Wilson RK , Wing RA , Wolfner MF , Wong A , Wong GK , Wu CI , Wu G , Yamamoto D , Yang HP , Yang SP , Yorke JA , Yoshida K , Zdobnov E , Zhang P , Zhang Y , Zimin AV , Baldwin J , Abdouelleil A , Abdulkadir J , Abebe A , Abera B , Abreu J , Acer SC , Aftuck L , Alexander A , An P , Anderson E , Anderson S , Arachi H , Azer M , Bachantsang P , Barry A , Bayul T , Berlin A , Bessette D , Bloom T , Blye J , Boguslavskiy L , Bonnet C , Boukhgalter B , Bourzgui I , Brown A , Cahill P , Channer S , Cheshatsang Y , Chuda L , Citroen M , Collymore A , Cooke P , Costello M , D'Aco K , Daza R , De Haan G , DeGray S , DeMaso C , Dhargay N , Dooley K , Dooley E , Doricent M , Dorje P , Dorjee K , Dupes A , Elong R , Falk J , Farina A , Faro S , Ferguson D , Fisher S , Foley CD , Franke A , Friedrich D , Gadbois L , Gearin G , Gearin CR , Giannoukos G , Goode T , Graham J , Grandbois E , Grewal S , Gyaltsen K , Hafez N , Hagos B , Hall J , Henson C , Hollinger A , Honan T , Huard MD , Hughes L , Hurhula B , Husby ME , Kamat A , Kanga B , Kashin S , Khazanovich D , Kisner P , Lance K , Lara M , Lee W , Lennon N , Letendre F , LeVine R , Lipovsky A , Liu X , Liu J , Liu S , Lokyitsang T , Lokyitsang Y , Lubonja R , Lui A , Macdonald P , Magnisalis V , Maru K , Matthews C , McCusker W , McDonough S , Mehta T , Meldrim J , Meneus L , Mihai O , Mihalev A , Mihova T , Mittelman R , Mlenga V , Montmayeur A , Mulrain L , Navidi A , Naylor J , Negash T , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nicol R , Norbu C , Norbu N , Novod N , O'Neill B , Osman S , Markiewicz E , Oyono OL , Patti C , Phunkhang P , Pierre F , Priest M , Raghuraman S , Rege F , Reyes R , Rise C , Rogov P , Ross K , Ryan E , Settipalli S , Shea T , Sherpa N , Shi L , Shih D , Sparrow T , Spaulding J , Stalker J , Stange-Thomann N , Stavropoulos S , Stone C , Strader C , Tesfaye S , Thomson T , Thoulutsang Y , Thoulutsang D , Topham K , Topping I , Tsamla T , Vassiliev H , Vo A , Wangchuk T , Wangdi T , Weiand M , Wilkinson J , Wilson A , Yadav S , Young G , Yu Q , Zembek L , Zhong D , Zimmer A , Zwirko Z , Alvarez P , Brockman W , Butler J , Chin C , Grabherr M , Kleber M , Mauceli E , MacCallum I
Ref : Nature , 450 :203 , 2007
Abstract : Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.
ESTHER : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedSearch : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedID: 17994087
Gene_locus related to this paper: droan-ACHE , droan-b3lx10 , droan-b3lx75 , droan-b3lxv7 , droan-b3ly87 , droan-b3lyh4 , droan-b3lyh5 , droan-b3lyh7 , droan-b3lyh9 , droan-b3lyi0 , droan-b3lyi2 , droan-b3lyi3 , droan-b3lyi4 , droan-b3lyj8 , droan-b3lyj9 , droan-b3lyx4 , droan-b3lyx5 , droan-b3lyx6 , droan-b3lyx7 , droan-b3lyx9 , droan-b3lz72 , droan-b3m1x3 , droan-b3m2d4 , droan-b3m3d9 , droan-b3m4e3 , droan-b3m5w1 , droan-b3m6i7 , droan-b3m7v2 , droan-b3m9a5 , droan-b3m9f4 , droan-b3m9p3 , droan-b3m254 , droan-b3m259 , droan-b3m260 , droan-b3m262 , droan-b3m524 , droan-b3m635 , droan-b3m845 , droan-b3m846 , droan-b3md01 , droan-b3mdh7 , droan-b3mdm6 , droan-b3mdw8 , droan-b3mee1 , droan-b3mf47 , droan-b3mf48 , droan-b3mg94 , droan-b3mgk2 , droan-b3mgn6 , droan-b3mii3 , droan-b3mjk2 , droan-b3mjk3 , droan-b3mjk4 , droan-b3mjk5 , droan-b3mjl2 , droan-b3mjl4 , droan-b3mjl7 , droan-b3mjl9 , droan-b3mjm8 , droan-b3mjm9 , droan-b3mjs6 , droan-b3mkr0 , droan-b3ml20 , droan-b3mly4 , droan-b3mly5 , droan-b3mly6 , droan-b3mmm8 , droan-b3mnb5 , droan-b3mny9 , droan-b3mtj5 , droan-b3muw4 , droan-b3muw8 , droan-b3n0e7 , droan-b3n2j7 , droan-b3n247 , droan-c5idb2 , droer-ACHE , droer-b3n5c7 , droer-b3n5d0 , droer-b3n5d8 , droer-b3n5d9 , droer-b3n5t7 , droer-b3n5y4 , droer-b3n7d2 , droer-b3n7d3 , droer-b3n7d4 , droer-b3n7k8 , droer-b3n8e4 , droer-b3n8f7 , droer-b3n8f8 , droer-b3n9e1 , droer-b3n319 , droer-b3n547 , droer-b3n549 , droer-b3n558 , droer-b3n560 , droer-b3n577 , droer-b3n612 , droer-b3nar5 , droer-b3nb91 , droer-b3nct9 , droer-b3nd53 , droer-b3ndh9 , droer-b3ndq8 , droer-b3ne66 , droer-b3ne67 , droer-b3ne97 , droer-b3nfk3 , droer-b3nfq9 , droer-b3nim7 , droer-b3nkn2 , droer-b3nm11 , droer-b3nmh4 , droer-b3nmy2 , droer-b3npx2 , droer-b3npx3 , droer-b3nq76 , droer-b3nqg9 , droer-b3nqm8 , droer-b3nr28 , droer-b3nrd3 , droer-b3nst4 , droer-b3nwa7 , droer-b3nyp5.1 , droer-b3nyp5.2 , droer-b3nyp6 , droer-b3nyp7 , droer-b3nyp8 , droer-b3nyp9 , droer-b3nyq3 , droer-b3nz06 , droer-b3nz14 , droer-b3nzj0 , droer-b3p0c0 , droer-b3p0c1 , droer-b3p0c2 , droer-b3p2x6 , droer-b3p2x7 , droer-b3p2x9 , droer-b3p2y1 , droer-b3p2y2 , droer-b3p6d4 , droer-b3p6d5 , droer-b3p6w3 , droer-b3p7b4 , droer-b3p7h9 , droer-b3p152 , droer-b3p486 , droer-b3p487 , droer-b3p488 , droer-b3p489 , droer-EST6 , droer-q670j5 , drogr-ACHE , drogr-b4iwp3 , drogr-b4iww3 , drogr-b4iwy3 , drogr-b4ixf7 , drogr-b4ixh4 , drogr-b4iyz5 , drogr-b4j2s2 , drogr-b4j2u8 , drogr-b4j3u1 , drogr-b4j3v3 , drogr-b4j4g7 , drogr-b4j4x9 , drogr-b4j6e6 , drogr-b4j9c9 , drogr-b4j9y4 , drogr-b4j156 , drogr-b4j384 , drogr-b4j605 , drogr-b4j685 , drogr-b4ja76 , drogr-b4jay5 , drogr-b4jcf0 , drogr-b4jcf1 , drogr-b4jdg6 , drogr-b4jdg7 , drogr-b4jdh6 , drogr-b4jdz1 , drogr-b4jdz2 , drogr-b4jdz4 , drogr-b4je66 , drogr-b4je79 , drogr-b4je82 , drogr-b4je88 , drogr-b4je89 , drogr-b4je90 , drogr-b4je91 , drogr-b4jf76 , drogr-b4jf79 , drogr-b4jf80 , drogr-b4jf81 , drogr-b4jf82 , drogr-b4jf83 , drogr-b4jf84 , drogr-b4jf85 , drogr-b4jf87 , drogr-b4jf91 , drogr-b4jf92 , drogr-b4jg66 , drogr-b4jgh0 , drogr-b4jgh1 , drogr-b4jgr9 , drogr-b4ji67 , drogr-b4jls2 , drogr-b4jnh9 , drogr-b4jpc6 , drogr-b4jpq3 , drogr-b4jpx9 , drogr-b4jql2 , drogr-b4jrh5 , drogr-b4jsb2 , drogr-b4jth3 , drogr-b4jti1 , drogr-b4jul5 , drogr-b4jur4 , drogr-b4jvh3 , drogr-b4jz00 , drogr-b4jz03 , drogr-b4jz04 , drogr-b4jz05 , drogr-b4jzh2 , drogr-b4k0u2 , drogr-b4k2r1 , drogr-b4k234 , drogr-b4k235 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG11626 , drome-GH02439 , dromo-ACHE , dromo-b4k6a7 , dromo-b4k6a8 , dromo-b4k6q8 , dromo-b4k6q9 , dromo-b4k6r1 , dromo-b4k6r3 , dromo-b4k6r4 , dromo-b4k6r5 , dromo-b4k6r6 , dromo-b4k6r7 , dromo-b4k6r8 , dromo-b4k6r9 , dromo-b4k6s0 , dromo-b4k6s1 , dromo-b4k6s2 , dromo-b4k9c7 , dromo-b4k9d3 , dromo-b4k571 , dromo-b4k721 , dromo-b4ka74 , dromo-b4ka89 , dromo-b4kaj4 , dromo-b4kc20 , dromo-b4kcl2 , dromo-b4kcl3 , dromo-b4kd55.1 , dromo-b4kd55.2 , dromo-b4kd56 , dromo-b4kd57 , dromo-b4kde1 , dromo-b4kdg2 , dromo-b4kdh4 , dromo-b4kdh5 , dromo-b4kdh6 , dromo-A0A0Q9XDF2 , dromo-b4kdh8.1 , dromo-b4kdh8.2 , dromo-b4kg04 , dromo-b4kg05 , dromo-b4kg06 , dromo-b4kg16 , dromo-b4kg44 , dromo-b4kg90 , dromo-b4kh20 , dromo-b4kh21 , dromo-b4kht7 , dromo-b4kid3 , dromo-b4kik0 , dromo-b4kjx0 , dromo-b4kki1 , dromo-b4kkp6 , dromo-b4kkp8 , dromo-b4kkq8 , dromo-b4kkr0 , dromo-b4kkr3 , dromo-b4kkr4 , dromo-b4kks0 , dromo-b4kks1 , dromo-b4kks2 , dromo-b4kla1 , dromo-b4klv8 , dromo-b4knt4 , dromo-b4kp08 , dromo-b4kp16 , dromo-b4kqa6 , dromo-b4kqa7 , dromo-b4kqa8 , dromo-b4kqh1 , dromo-b4kst4 , dromo-b4ksy6 , dromo-b4kt84 , dromo-b4ktf5 , dromo-b4ktf6 , dromo-b4kvl3 , dromo-b4kvw2 , dromo-b4kwv4 , dromo-b4kwv5 , dromo-b4kxz6 , dromo-b4ky12 , dromo-b4ky36 , dromo-b4ky44 , dromo-b4kzu7 , dromo-b4l0n8 , dromo-b4l4u5 , dromo-b4l6l9 , dromo-b4l084 , drope-ACHE , drope-b4g3s6 , drope-b4g4p7 , drope-b4g6v4 , drope-b4g8m0 , drope-b4g8n6 , drope-b4g8n7 , drope-b4g9p2 , drope-b4g815 , drope-b4g816 , drope-b4gat7 , drope-b4gav5 , drope-b4gb05 , drope-b4gc08 , drope-b4gcr3 , drope-b4gdk2 , drope-b4gdl9 , drope-b4gdv9 , drope-b4gei8 , drope-b4gei9 , drope-b4gej0 , drope-b4ghz9 , drope-b4gj62 , drope-b4gj64 , drope-b4gj74 , drope-b4gkf4 , drope-b4gkv2 , drope-b4gky9 , drope-b4gl76 , drope-b4glf3 , drope-b4gmt3 , drope-b4gmt7 , drope-b4gmt9 , drope-b4gmu2 , drope-b4gmu3 , drope-b4gmu4 , drope-b4gmu5 , drope-b4gmu6 , drope-b4gmu7 , drope-b4gmv1 , drope-b4gn08 , drope-b4gpa7 , drope-b4gq13 , drope-b4grh7 , drope-b4gsf9 , drope-b4gsw4 , drope-b4gsw5 , drope-b4gsx2 , drope-b4gsx7 , drope-b4gsy6 , drope-b4gsy7 , drope-b4guj8 , drope-b4gw36 , drope-b4gzc2 , drope-b4gzc6 , drope-b4gzc7 , drope-b4h4p9 , drope-b4h5l3 , drope-b4h6a0 , drope-b4h6a8 , drope-b4h6a9 , drope-b4h6b0 , drope-b4h7m7 , drope-b4h462 , drope-b4h601 , drope-b4h602 , drope-b4hay1 , drope-b4hb18 , drope-est5a , drope-est5b , drope-est5c , drops-ACHE , drops-b5dhd2 , drops-b5dk96 , drops-b5dpe3 , drops-b5drp9 , drops-b5dwa7 , drops-b5dwa8 , drops-b5dz85 , drops-b5dz86 , drops-est5a , drops-est5b , drops-q29bq2 , drops-q29dd7 , drops-q29ew0 , drops-q291d5 , drops-q291e8 , drops-q293n1 , drops-q293n4 , drops-q293n5 , drops-q293n6 , drops-q294n6 , drops-q294n7 , drops-q294n9 , drops-q294p4 , drose-b4he97 , drose-b4hfu2 , drose-b4hg54 , drose-b4hga0 , drose-b4hgu9 , drose-b4hgv0 , drose-b4hgv3 , drose-b4hgv4 , drose-b4hhm8 , drose-b4hhs6 , drose-b4hie4 , drose-b4him9 , drose-b4hk63 , drose-b4hkj5 , drose-b4hr07 , drose-b4hr81 , drose-b4hre7 , drose-b4hs13 , drose-b4hsj9 , drose-b4hsk0 , drose-b4hsm8 , drose-b4hvr5 , drose-b4hwr7 , drose-b4hwr8 , drose-b4hwr9 , drose-b4hws6 , drose-b4hws7 , drose-b4hwt0 , drose-b4hwt2 , drose-b4hwu1 , drose-b4hwu2 , drose-b4hxs9 , drose-b4hxu4 , drose-b4hxz1 , drose-b4hyp8 , drose-b4hyp9 , drose-b4hyq0 , drose-b4hyz4 , drose-b4hyz5 , drose-b4i1k8 , drose-b4i2f3 , drose-b4i2w5 , drose-b4i4u3 , drose-b4i4u7 , drose-b4i4u9 , drose-b4i4v0 , drose-b4i4v1 , drose-b4i4v4 , drose-b4i4v5 , drose-b4i4v6 , drose-b4i4v7 , drose-b4i4v8 , drose-b4i4w0 , drose-b4i7s6 , drose-b4i133 , drose-b4i857 , drose-b4iam7 , drose-b4iam9 , drose-b4iaq6 , drose-b4icf6 , drose-b4icf7 , drose-b4id80 , drose-b4ifc5 , drose-b4ihv9 , drose-b4iie9 , drose-b4ilj8 , drose-b4in13 , drose-b4inj9 , drosi-ACHE , drosi-aes04a , drosi-b4nsh8 , drosi-b4q3d7 , drosi-b4q4w5 , drosi-b4q4y7 , drosi-b4q6h6 , drosi-b4q7u2 , drosi-b4q7u3 , drosi-b4q9c6 , drosi-b4q9c7 , drosi-b4q9d3 , drosi-b4q9d4 , drosi-b4q9r0 , drosi-b4q9r1 , drosi-b4q9r3 , drosi-b4q9s2 , drosi-b4q9s3 , drosi-b4q429 , drosi-b4q530 , drosi-b4q734 , drosi-b4q782 , drosi-b4q783 , drosi-b4q942 , drosi-b4qet1 , drosi-b4qfv6 , drosi-b4qge5 , drosi-b4qgh5 , drosi-b4qgs5 , drosi-b4qhf3 , drosi-b4qhf4 , drosi-b4qhi5 , drosi-b4qjr2 , drosi-b4qjr3 , drosi-b4qjv6 , drosi-b4qk23 , drosi-b4qk51 , drosi-b4qlt1 , drosi-b4qlz9 , drosi-b4qmn9 , drosi-b4qrq7 , drosi-b4qs01 , drosi-b4qs57 , drosi-b4qs82 , drosi-b4qs83 , drosi-b4qs84 , drosi-b4qs85 , drosi-b4qs86 , drosi-b4qsq1 , drosi-b4quk6 , drosi-b4qvg5 , drosi-b4qvg6 , drosi-b4qzn2 , drosi-b4qzn3 , drosi-b4qzn5 , drosi-b4qzn7 , drosi-b4qzn8 , drosi-b4qzp2 , drosi-b4qzp3 , drosi-b4qzp4 , drosi-b4qzp5 , drosi-b4qzp6 , drosi-b4qzp7 , drosi-b4r1a4 , drosi-b4r025 , drosi-b4r207 , drosi-b4r662 , drosi-este6 , drosi-q670k8 , drovi-ACHE , drovi-b4lev2 , drovi-b4lf33 , drovi-b4lf51 , drovi-b4lg54 , drovi-b4lg72 , drovi-b4lgc6 , drovi-b4lgd5 , drovi-b4lgg0 , drovi-b4lgk5 , drovi-b4lgn2 , drovi-b4lh17 , drovi-b4lh18 , drovi-b4lk43 , drovi-b4ll59 , drovi-b4ll60 , drovi-b4llm5 , drovi-b4lln3 , drovi-b4lmk4 , drovi-b4lmp0 , drovi-b4lnr4 , drovi-b4lp47 , drovi-b4lpd0 , drovi-b4lps0 , drovi-b4lqc6 , drovi-b4lr00 , drovi-b4lrp6 , drovi-b4lrw2 , drovi-b4lse7 , drovi-b4lse9 , drovi-b4lsf0 , drovi-b4lsn0 , drovi-b4lsq5 , drovi-b4lt32 , drovi-b4ltr1 , drovi-b4lui7 , drovi-b4lui9 , drovi-b4luj8 , drovi-b4luk0 , drovi-b4luk3 , drovi-b4luk8 , drovi-b4luk9 , drovi-b4lul0 , drovi-b4lve2 , drovi-b4lxi9 , drovi-b4lxj8 , drovi-b4lyf3 , drovi-b4lyq2 , drovi-b4lyq3 , drovi-b4lz07 , drovi-b4lz13 , drovi-b4lz14 , drovi-b4lz15 , drovi-b4m0j7 , drovi-b4m0s0 , drovi-b4m2b6 , drovi-b4m4h7 , drovi-b4m4h8 , drovi-b4m4i0 , drovi-b4m4i2 , drovi-b4m4i3.A , drovi-b4m4i3.B , drovi-b4m4i4 , drovi-b4m4i5 , drovi-b4m4i6 , drovi-b4m4i7 , drovi-b4m4i8 , drovi-b4m4i9 , drovi-b4m4j2 , drovi-b4m5a0 , drovi-b4m5a1 , drovi-b4m5a2 , drovi-b4m6b9 , drovi-b4m7k9 , drovi-b4m9g9 , drovi-b4m9h0 , drovi-b4m564 , drovi-b4m599 , drovi-b4m918 , drovi-b4mb87 , drovi-b4mc71 , drovi-b4mfa4 , drowi-ACHE , drowi-b4mjb9 , drowi-b4mkt7 , drowi-b4mlc1 , drowi-b4mp68 , drowi-b4mqe9 , drowi-b4mqf0.2 , drowi-b4mqf1 , drowi-b4mqf3 , drowi-b4mqf4 , drowi-b4mqf5 , drowi-b4mqq6 , drowi-b4mrd1 , drowi-b4mrk3 , drowi-b4mtl5 , drowi-b4mug2 , drowi-b4muj8 , drowi-b4mv18 , drowi-b4mw32 , drowi-b4mw85 , drowi-b4mwp2 , drowi-b4mwp6 , drowi-b4mwq5 , drowi-b4mwr0 , drowi-b4mwr8 , drowi-b4mwr9 , drowi-b4mwt1 , drowi-b4mwz7 , drowi-b4mxn5 , drowi-b4my54 , drowi-b4myg1 , drowi-b4myh5 , drowi-b4n0d4 , drowi-b4n1a7 , drowi-b4n1c8 , drowi-b4n3s9 , drowi-b4n3x7 , drowi-b4n4x9 , drowi-b4n4y0 , drowi-b4n6m1 , drowi-b4n6n0 , drowi-b4n6n7 , drowi-b4n6u6 , drowi-b4n7s6 , drowi-b4n7s7 , drowi-b4n7s8 , drowi-b4n899.1 , drowi-b4n8a1 , drowi-b4n8a2 , drowi-b4n8a3 , drowi-b4n8a4 , drowi-b4n8a9 , drowi-b4n023 , drowi-b4n075 , drowi-b4n543 , drowi-b4n888 , drowi-b4n889 , drowi-b4n891 , drowi-b4n893 , drowi-b4n895 , drowi-b4n897 , drowi-b4n898 , drowi-b4n899.2 , drowi-b4nae3 , drowi-b4ner8 , drowi-b4ng76 , drowi-b4nga7 , drowi-b4ngb5 , drowi-b4nhz9 , drowi-b4nj18 , drowi-b4nj19 , drowi-b4nja7 , drowi-b4nja8 , drowi-b4nja9 , drowi-b4njk8 , drowi-b4nkc8 , drowi-b4nky0 , drowi-b4nl36 , drowi-b4nm27 , drowi-b4nn59 , drowi-b4nnc1 , drowi-b4nng1 , drowi-b4nng2 , droya-ACHE , droya-aes04 , droya-b4itg2 , droya-b4itg6 , droya-b4itu9 , droya-b4iuv4 , droya-b4iuv5 , droya-b4nxe6 , droya-b4nxg5 , droya-b4nxg6 , droya-b4nxg8 , droya-b4nxw4 , droya-b4ny57 , droya-b4ny58 , droya-b4ny86 , droya-b4nzz8 , droya-b4p0b5 , droya-b4p0q9 , droya-b4p0r0 , droya-b4p0r7 , droya-b4p0r8 , droya-b4p0r9 , droya-b4p0s0 , droya-b4p0s2 , droya-b4p0t0 , droya-b4p0t1 , droya-b4p3h4 , droya-b4p3x8 , droya-b4p5g8 , droya-b4p6c9 , droya-b4p6l9 , droya-b4p6r1 , droya-b4p6r2 , droya-b4p7u4 , droya-b4p8w7 , droya-b4p023 , droya-b4p241 , droya-b4p774 , droya-b4pat9 , droya-b4pbl1 , droya-b4pd22 , droya-b4pd70 , droya-b4pdm8 , droya-b4pet9 , droya-b4pff9 , droya-b4pga7 , droya-b4pgu0 , droya-b4pig3 , droya-b4pjt8 , droya-b4pka2 , droya-b4plh2 , droya-b4pma3 , droya-b4pmv3 , droya-b4pmv4 , droya-b4pmv5 , droya-b4pn92 , droya-b4pp65 , droya-b4ppc5 , droya-b4ppc6 , droya-b4ppc7 , droya-b4ppc8 , droya-b4pq03 , droya-b4prg6B , droya-b4prg9 , droya-b4prh3 , droya-b4prh4 , droya-b4prh6 , droya-b4prh7 , droya-b4psz8 , droya-b4psz9 , droya-b4pv22 , droya-b4q0g5 , droya-b4q246 , droya-EST6 , droya-q71d76 , drowi-b4n7m9 , drope-b4gkk1 , droer-b3n5s3 , drose-b4i1w5 , drowi-a0a0q9x0t3 , drogr-b4jvm7 , dromo-b4ku70 , drovi-b4mcn9 , drovi-b4lty2 , drogr-b4jdu1 , drovi-a0a0q9wiq8 , dromo-b4kf70 , drosi-b2zi86 , droya-b4p2y4 , drose-b2zic5 , droer-b3n895

Title : Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome - Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Rogers J , Katze MG , Bumgarner R , Weinstock GM , Mardis ER , Remington KA , Strausberg RL , Venter JC , Wilson RK , Batzer MA , Bustamante CD , Eichler EE , Hahn MW , Hardison RC , Makova KD , Miller W , Milosavljevic A , Palermo RE , Siepel A , Sikela JM , Attaway T , Bell S , Bernard KE , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Dao M , Davis C , Delehaunty KD , Ding Y , Dinh HH , Dugan-Rocha S , Fulton LA , Gabisi RA , Garner TT , Godfrey J , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Kirkness EF , Cree A , Fowler RG , Lee S , Lewis LR , Li Z , Liu YS , Moore SM , Muzny D , Nazareth LV , Ngo DN , Okwuonu GO , Pai G , Parker D , Paul HA , Pfannkoch C , Pohl CS , Rogers YH , Ruiz SJ , Sabo A , Santibanez J , Schneider BW , Smith SM , Sodergren E , Svatek AF , Utterback TR , Vattathil S , Warren W , White CS , Chinwalla AT , Feng Y , Halpern AL , Hillier LW , Huang X , Minx P , Nelson JO , Pepin KH , Qin X , Sutton GG , Venter E , Walenz BP , Wallis JW , Worley KC , Yang SP , Jones SM , Marra MA , Rocchi M , Schein JE , Baertsch R , Clarke L , Csuros M , Glasscock J , Harris RA , Havlak P , Jackson AR , Jiang H , Liu Y , Messina DN , Shen Y , Song HX , Wylie T , Zhang L , Birney E , Han K , Konkel MK , Lee J , Smit AF , Ullmer B , Wang H , Xing J , Burhans R , Cheng Z , Karro JE , Ma J , Raney B , She X , Cox MJ , Demuth JP , Dumas LJ , Han SG , Hopkins J , Karimpour-Fard A , Kim YH , Pollack JR , Vinar T , Addo-Quaye C , Degenhardt J , Denby A , Hubisz MJ , Indap A , Kosiol C , Lahn BT , Lawson HA , Marklein A , Nielsen R , Vallender EJ , Clark AG , Ferguson B , Hernandez RD , Hirani K , Kehrer-Sawatzki H , Kolb J , Patil S , Pu LL , Ren Y , Smith DG , Wheeler DA , Schenck I , Ball EV , Chen R , Cooper DN , Giardine B , Hsu F , Kent WJ , Lesk A , Nelson DL , O'Brien W E , Prufer K , Stenson PD , Wallace JC , Ke H , Liu XM , Wang P , Xiang AP , Yang F , Barber GP , Haussler D , Karolchik D , Kern AD , Kuhn RM , Smith KE , Zwieg AS
Ref : Science , 316 :222 , 2007
Abstract : The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedID: 17431167
Gene_locus related to this paper: macmu-3neur , macmu-ACHE , macmu-BCHE , macmu-f6rul6 , macmu-f6sz31 , macmu-f6the6 , macmu-f6unj2 , macmu-f6wtx1 , macmu-f6zkq5 , macmu-f7aa58 , macmu-f7ai42 , macmu-f7aim4 , macmu-f7buk8 , macmu-f7cfi8 , macmu-f7cnr2 , macmu-f7cu68 , macmu-f7flv1 , macmu-f7ggk1 , macmu-f7hir7 , macmu-g7n054 , macmu-KANSL3 , macmu-TEX30 , macmu-Y4neur , macmu-g7n4x3 , macmu-i2cy02 , macmu-f7ba84 , macmu-CES2 , macmu-h9er02 , macmu-a0a1d5rbr3 , macmu-a0a1d5q4k5 , macmu-g7mxj6 , macmu-f7dn71 , macmu-f7hkw9 , macmu-f7hm08 , macmu-g7mke4 , macmu-a0a1d5rh04 , macmu-h9fud6 , macmu-f6qwx1 , macmu-f7h4t2 , macmu-h9zaw9 , macmu-f7h550 , macmu-a0a1d5q9w1 , macmu-f7gkb9 , macmu-f7hp78 , macmu-a0a1d5qvu5

Title : Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4 - Hillier_2005_Nature_434_724
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Graves TA , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Pepin KH , Minx P , Wagner-McPherson C , Layman D , Wylie K , Sekhon M , Becker MC , Fewell GA , Delehaunty KD , Miner TL , Nash WE , Kremitzki C , Oddy L , Du H , Sun H , Bradshaw-Cordum H , Ali J , Carter J , Cordes M , Harris A , Isak A , Van Brunt A , Nguyen C , Du F , Courtney L , Kalicki J , Ozersky P , Abbott S , Armstrong J , Belter EA , Caruso L , Cedroni M , Cotton M , Davidson T , Desai A , Elliott G , Erb T , Fronick C , Gaige T , Haakenson W , Haglund K , Holmes A , Harkins R , Kim K , Kruchowski SS , Strong CM , Grewal N , Goyea E , Hou S , Levy A , Martinka S , Mead K , McLellan MD , Meyer R , Randall-Maher J , Tomlinson C , Dauphin-Kohlberg S , Kozlowicz-Reilly A , Shah N , Swearengen-Shahid S , Snider J , Strong JT , Thompson J , Yoakum M , Leonard S , Pearman C , Trani L , Radionenko M , Waligorski JE , Wang C , Rock SM , Tin-Wollam AM , Maupin R , Latreille P , Wendl MC , Yang SP , Pohl C , Wallis JW , Spieth J , Bieri TA , Berkowicz N , Nelson JO , Osborne J , Ding L , Sabo A , Shotland Y , Sinha P , Wohldmann PE , Cook LL , Hickenbotham MT , Eldred J , Williams D , Jones TA , She X , Ciccarelli FD , Izaurralde E , Taylor J , Schmutz J , Myers RM , Cox DR , Huang X , McPherson JD , Mardis ER , Clifton SW , Warren WC , Chinwalla AT , Eddy SR , Marra MA , Ovcharenko I , Furey TS , Miller W , Eichler EE , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Waterston RH , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 434 :724 , 2005
Abstract : Human chromosome 2 is unique to the human lineage in being the product of a head-to-head fusion of two intermediate-sized ancestral chromosomes. Chromosome 4 has received attention primarily related to the search for the Huntington's disease gene, but also for genes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, polycystic kidney disease and a form of muscular dystrophy. Here we present approximately 237 million base pairs of sequence for chromosome 2, and 186 million base pairs for chromosome 4, representing more than 99.6% of their euchromatic sequences. Our initial analyses have identified 1,346 protein-coding genes and 1,239 pseudogenes on chromosome 2, and 796 protein-coding genes and 778 pseudogenes on chromosome 4. Extensive analyses confirm the underlying construction of the sequence, and expand our understanding of the structure and evolution of mammalian chromosomes, including gene deserts, segmental duplications and highly variant regions.
ESTHER : Hillier_2005_Nature_434_724
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2005_Nature_434_724
PubMedID: 15815621
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD1 , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-KANSL3 , human-PGAP1 , human-PREPL

Title : Conservation of Y-linked genes during human evolution revealed by comparative sequencing in chimpanzee - Hughes_2005_Nature_437_100
Author(s) : Hughes JF , Skaletsky H , Pyntikova T , Minx PJ , Graves T , Rozen S , Wilson RK , Page DC
Ref : Nature , 437 :100 , 2005
Abstract : The human Y chromosome, transmitted clonally through males, contains far fewer genes than the sexually recombining autosome from which it evolved. The enormity of this evolutionary decline has led to predictions that the Y chromosome will be completely bereft of functional genes within ten million years. Although recent evidence of gene conversion within massive Y-linked palindromes runs counter to this hypothesis, most unique Y-linked genes are not situated in palindromes and have no gene conversion partners. The 'impending demise' hypothesis thus rests on understanding the degree of conservation of these genes. Here we find, by systematically comparing the DNA sequences of unique, Y-linked genes in chimpanzee and human, which diverged about six million years ago, evidence that in the human lineage, all such genes were conserved through purifying selection. In the chimpanzee lineage, by contrast, several genes have sustained inactivating mutations. Gene decay in the chimpanzee lineage might be a consequence of positive selection focused elsewhere on the Y chromosome and driven by sperm competition.
ESTHER : Hughes_2005_Nature_437_100
PubMedSearch : Hughes_2005_Nature_437_100
PubMedID: 16136134
Gene_locus related to this paper: pantr-h2rbj9 , pantr-h2qku7

Title : The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome - Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
Author(s) : Ross MT , Grafham DV , Coffey AJ , Scherer S , McLay K , Muzny D , Platzer M , Howell GR , Burrows C , Bird CP , Frankish A , Lovell FL , Howe KL , Ashurst JL , Fulton RS , Sudbrak R , Wen G , Jones MC , Hurles ME , Andrews TD , Scott CE , Searle S , Ramser J , Whittaker A , Deadman R , Carter NP , Hunt SE , Chen R , Cree A , Gunaratne P , Havlak P , Hodgson A , Metzker ML , Richards S , Scott G , Steffen D , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Ainscough R , Ambrose KD , Ansari-Lari MA , Aradhya S , Ashwell RI , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Ballabio A , Banerjee R , Barker GE , Barlow KF , Barrett IP , Bates KN , Beare DM , Beasley H , Beasley O , Beck A , Bethel G , Blechschmidt K , Brady N , Bray-Allen S , Bridgeman AM , Brown AJ , Brown MJ , Bonnin D , Bruford EA , Buhay C , Burch P , Burford D , Burgess J , Burrill W , Burton J , Bye JM , Carder C , Carrel L , Chako J , Chapman JC , Chavez D , Chen E , Chen G , Chen Y , Chen Z , Chinault C , Ciccodicola A , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee CM , Clegg S , Clerc-Blankenburg K , Clifford K , Cobley V , Cole CG , Conquer JS , Corby N , Connor RE , David R , Davies J , Davis C , Davis J , Delgado O , Deshazo D , Dhami P , Ding Y , Dinh H , Dodsworth S , Draper H , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunham A , Dunn M , Durbin KJ , Dutta I , Eades T , Ellwood M , Emery-Cohen A , Errington H , Evans KL , Faulkner L , Francis F , Frankland J , Fraser AE , Galgoczy P , Gilbert J , Gill R , Glockner G , Gregory SG , Gribble S , Griffiths C , Grocock R , Gu Y , Gwilliam R , Hamilton C , Hart EA , Hawes A , Heath PD , Heitmann K , Hennig S , Hernandez J , Hinzmann B , Ho S , Hoffs M , Howden PJ , Huckle EJ , Hume J , Hunt PJ , Hunt AR , Isherwood J , Jacob L , Johnson D , Jones S , de Jong PJ , Joseph SS , Keenan S , Kelly S , Kershaw JK , Khan Z , Kioschis P , Klages S , Knights AJ , Kosiura A , Kovar-Smith C , Laird GK , Langford C , Lawlor S , Leversha M , Lewis L , Liu W , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Loulseged H , Loveland JE , Lovell JD , Lozado R , Lu J , Lyne R , Ma J , Maheshwari M , Matthews LH , McDowall J , Mclaren S , McMurray A , Meidl P , Meitinger T , Milne S , Miner G , Mistry SL , Morgan M , Morris S , Muller I , Mullikin JC , Nguyen N , Nordsiek G , Nyakatura G , O'Dell CN , Okwuonu G , Palmer S , Pandian R , Parker D , Parrish J , Pasternak S , Patel D , Pearce AV , Pearson DM , Pelan SE , Perez L , Porter KM , Ramsey Y , Reichwald K , Rhodes S , Ridler KA , Schlessinger D , Schueler MG , Sehra HK , Shaw-Smith C , Shen H , Sheridan EM , Shownkeen R , Skuce CD , Smith ML , Sotheran EC , Steingruber HE , Steward CA , Storey R , Swann RM , Swarbreck D , Tabor PE , Taudien S , Taylor T , Teague B , Thomas K , Thorpe A , Timms K , Tracey A , Trevanion S , Tromans AC , d'Urso M , Verduzco D , Villasana D , Waldron L , Wall M , Wang Q , Warren J , Warry GL , Wei X , West A , Whitehead SL , Whiteley MN , Wilkinson JE , Willey DL , Williams G , Williams L , Williamson A , Williamson H , Wilming L , Woodmansey RL , Wray PW , Yen J , Zhang J , Zhou J , Zoghbi H , Zorilla S , Buck D , Reinhardt R , Poustka A , Rosenthal A , Lehrach H , Meindl A , Minx PJ , Hillier LW , Willard HF , Wilson RK , Waterston RH , Rice CM , Vaudin M , Coulson A , Nelson DL , Weinstock G , Sulston JE , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Gibbs RA , Beck S , Rogers J , Bentley DR
Ref : Nature , 434 :325 , 2005
Abstract : The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
ESTHER : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedSearch : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedID: 15772651
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X

Title : Comparison of genome degradation in Paratyphi A and Typhi, human-restricted serovars of Salmonella enterica that cause typhoid - McClelland_2004_Nat.Genet_36_1268
Author(s) : McClelland M , Sanderson KE , Clifton SW , Latreille P , Porwollik S , Sabo A , Meyer R , Bieri T , Ozersky P , McLellan M , Harkins CR , Wang C , Nguyen C , Berghoff A , Elliott G , Kohlberg S , Strong C , Du F , Carter J , Kremizki C , Layman D , Leonard S , Sun H , Fulton L , Nash W , Miner T , Minx P , Delehaunty K , Fronick C , Magrini V , Nhan M , Warren W , Florea L , Spieth J , Wilson RK
Ref : Nat Genet , 36 :1268 , 2004
Abstract : Salmonella enterica serovars often have a broad host range, and some cause both gastrointestinal and systemic disease. But the serovars Paratyphi A and Typhi are restricted to humans and cause only systemic disease. It has been estimated that Typhi arose in the last few thousand years. The sequence and microarray analysis of the Paratyphi A genome indicates that it is similar to the Typhi genome but suggests that it has a more recent evolutionary origin. Both genomes have independently accumulated many pseudogenes among their approximately 4,400 protein coding sequences: 173 in Paratyphi A and approximately 210 in Typhi. The recent convergence of these two similar genomes on a similar phenotype is subtly reflected in their genotypes: only 30 genes are degraded in both serovars. Nevertheless, these 30 genes include three known to be important in gastroenteritis, which does not occur in these serovars, and four for Salmonella-translocated effectors, which are normally secreted into host cells to subvert host functions. Loss of function also occurs by mutation in different genes in the same pathway (e.g., in chemotaxis and in the production of fimbriae).
ESTHER : McClelland_2004_Nat.Genet_36_1268
PubMedSearch : McClelland_2004_Nat.Genet_36_1268
PubMedID: 15531882
Gene_locus related to this paper: salen-OPDB , salty-AES , salty-BIOH , salty-DLHH , salty-ENTF , salty-FES , salty-IROD , salty-IROE , salty-P74847 , salty-PLDB , salty-STM2547 , salty-STM4506 , salty-STY1441 , salty-STY2428 , salty-STY3846 , salty-yafa , salty-YBFF , salty-ycfp , salty-YFBB , salty-YHET , salty-YQIA

Title : Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution - Hillier_2004_Nature_432_695
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Miller W , Birney E , Warren W , Hardison RC , Ponting CP , Bork P , Burt DW , Groenen MA , Delany ME , Dodgson JB , Chinwalla AT , Cliften PF , Clifton SW , Delehaunty KD , Fronick C , Fulton RS , Graves TA , Kremitzki C , Layman D , Magrini V , McPherson JD , Miner TL , Minx P , Nash WE , Nhan MN , Nelson JO , Oddy LG , Pohl CS , Randall-Maher J , Smith SM , Wallis JW , Yang SP , Romanov MN , Rondelli CM , Paton B , Smith J , Morrice D , Daniels L , Tempest HG , Robertson L , Masabanda JS , Griffin DK , Vignal A , Fillon V , Jacobbson L , Kerje S , Andersson L , Crooijmans RP , Aerts J , van der Poel JJ , Ellegren H , Caldwell RB , Hubbard SJ , Grafham DV , Kierzek AM , McLaren SR , Overton IM , Arakawa H , Beattie KJ , Bezzubov Y , Boardman PE , Bonfield JK , Croning MD , Davies RM , Francis MD , Humphray SJ , Scott CE , Taylor RG , Tickle C , Brown WR , Rogers J , Buerstedde JM , Wilson SA , Stubbs L , Ovcharenko I , Gordon L , Lucas S , Miller MM , Inoko H , Shiina T , Kaufman J , Salomonsen J , Skjoedt K , Ka-Shu Wong G , Wang J , Liu B , Yu J , Yang H , Nefedov M , Koriabine M , deJong PJ , Goodstadt L , Webber C , Dickens NJ , Letunic I , Suyama M , Torrents D , von Mering C , Zdobnov EM , Makova K , Nekrutenko A , Elnitski L , Eswara P , King DC , Yang S , Tyekucheva S , Radakrishnan A , Harris RS , Chiaromonte F , Taylor J , He J , Rijnkels M , Griffiths-Jones S , Ureta-Vidal A , Hoffman MM , Severin J , Searle SM , Law AS , Speed D , Waddington D , Cheng Z , Tuzun E , Eichler E , Bao Z , Flicek P , Shteynberg DD , Brent MR , Bye JM , Huckle EJ , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Kouranov A , Mourelatos Z , Hatzigeorgiou AG , Paterson AH , Ivarie R , Brandstrom M , Axelsson E , Backstrom N , Berlin S , Webster MT , Pourquie O , Reymond A , Ucla C , Antonarakis SE , Long M , Emerson JJ , Betran E , Dupanloup I , Kaessmann H , Hinrichs AS , Bejerano G , Furey TS , Harte RA , Raney B , Siepel A , Kent WJ , Haussler D , Eyras E , Castelo R , Abril JF , Castellano S , Camara F , Parra G , Guigo R , Bourque G , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Smit A , Fulton LA , Mardis ER , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 432 :695 , 2004
Abstract : We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance between chicken and human provides high specificity in detecting functional elements, both non-coding and coding. Notably, many conserved non-coding sequences are far from genes and cannot be assigned to defined functional classes. In coding regions the evolutionary dynamics of protein domains and orthologous groups illustrate processes that distinguish the lineages leading to birds and mammals. The distinctive properties of avian microchromosomes, together with the inferred patterns of conserved synteny, provide additional insights into vertebrate chromosome architecture.
ESTHER : Hillier_2004_Nature_432_695
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2004_Nature_432_695
PubMedID: 15592404
Gene_locus related to this paper: chick-a0a1d5pmd9 , chick-b3tzb3 , chick-BCHE , chick-cb043 , chick-d3wgl5 , chick-e1bsm0 , chick-e1bvq6 , chick-e1bwz0 , chick-e1bwz1 , chick-e1byn1 , chick-e1bz81 , chick-e1c0z8 , chick-e1c7p7 , chick-f1nby4 , chick-f1ncz8 , chick-f1ndp3 , chick-f1nep4 , chick-f1nj68 , chick-f1njg6 , chick-f1njk4 , chick-f1njs4 , chick-f1njs5 , chick-f1nk87 , chick-f1nmx9 , chick-f1ntp8 , chick-f1nvg7 , chick-f1nwf2 , chick-f1p1l1 , chick-f1p3j5 , chick-f1p4c6 , chick-f1p508 , chick-fas , chick-h9l0k6 , chick-nlgn1 , chick-NLGN3 , chick-q5f3h8 , chick-q5zhm0 , chick-q5zi81 , chick-q5zij5 , chick-q5zin0 , chick-thyro , chick-f1nrq2 , chick-e1byd4 , chick-e1c2h6 , chick-a0a1d5pk92 , chick-a0a1d5pzg7 , chick-f1nbc2 , chick-f1nf25 , chick-f1nly5 , chick-f1p4h5 , chick-f1nzi7 , chick-f1p5k3 , chick-f1nm35 , chick-a0a1d5pl11 , chick-a0a1d5pj73 , chick-f1nxu6 , chick-a0a1d5nwc0 , chick-e1bxs8 , chick-f1p2g7 , chick-f1nd96

Title : The genome sequence of Caenorhabditis briggsae: a platform for comparative genomics - Stein_2003_PLoS.Biol_1_E45
Author(s) : Stein LD , Bao Z , Blasiar D , Blumenthal T , Brent MR , Chen N , Chinwalla A , Clarke L , Clee C , Coghlan A , Coulson A , D'Eustachio P , Fitch DH , Fulton LA , Fulton RE , Griffiths-Jones S , Harris TW , Hillier LW , Kamath R , Kuwabara PE , Mardis ER , Marra MA , Miner TL , Minx P , Mullikin JC , Plumb RW , Rogers J , Schein JE , Sohrmann M , Spieth J , Stajich JE , Wei C , Willey D , Wilson RK , Durbin R , Waterston RH
Ref : PLoS Biol , 1 :E45 , 2003
Abstract : The soil nematodes Caenorhabditis briggsae and Caenorhabditis elegans diverged from a common ancestor roughly 100 million years ago and yet are almost indistinguishable by eye. They have the same chromosome number and genome sizes, and they occupy the same ecological niche. To explore the basis for this striking conservation of structure and function, we have sequenced the C. briggsae genome to a high-quality draft stage and compared it to the finished C. elegans sequence. We predict approximately 19,500 protein-coding genes in the C. briggsae genome, roughly the same as in C. elegans. Of these, 12,200 have clear C. elegans orthologs, a further 6,500 have one or more clearly detectable C. elegans homologs, and approximately 800 C. briggsae genes have no detectable matches in C. elegans. Almost all of the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) known are shared between the two species. The two genomes exhibit extensive colinearity, and the rate of divergence appears to be higher in the chromosomal arms than in the centers. Operons, a distinctive feature of C. elegans, are highly conserved in C. briggsae, with the arrangement of genes being preserved in 96% of cases. The difference in size between the C. briggsae (estimated at approximately 104 Mbp) and C. elegans (100.3 Mbp) genomes is almost entirely due to repetitive sequence, which accounts for 22.4% of the C. briggsae genome in contrast to 16.5% of the C. elegans genome. Few, if any, repeat families are shared, suggesting that most were acquired after the two species diverged or are undergoing rapid evolution. Coclustering the C. elegans and C. briggsae proteins reveals 2,169 protein families of two or more members. Most of these are shared between the two species, but some appear to be expanding or contracting, and there seem to be as many as several hundred novel C. briggsae gene families. The C. briggsae draft sequence will greatly improve the annotation of the C. elegans genome. Based on similarity to C. briggsae, we found strong evidence for 1,300 new C. elegans genes. In addition, comparisons of the two genomes will help to understand the evolutionary forces that mold nematode genomes.
ESTHER : Stein_2003_PLoS.Biol_1_E45
PubMedSearch : Stein_2003_PLoS.Biol_1_E45
PubMedID: 14624247
Gene_locus related to this paper: caebr-a8wl70 , caebr-a8wm66 , caebr-a8wny7 , caebr-a8wpj6 , caebr-a8wpy7.1 , caebr-a8wq91 , caebr-a8wr10 , caebr-A8WSQ5 , caebr-a8wta1 , caebr-A8WTU9 , caebr-a8wux6 , caebr-A8WX49 , caebr-a8wxx0 , caebr-a8wyd4 , caebr-a8wye8 , caebr-a8wz10 , caebr-a8wz31.1 , caebr-a8wz31.2 , caebr-a8wz31.4 , caebr-a8wzp9 , caebr-a8wzr9.1 , caebr-a8wzr9.2 , caebr-a8wzs0 , caebr-a8wzs1 , caebr-a8x0r9 , caebr-a8x0z5 , caebr-a8x1l6 , caebr-a8x1r6 , caebr-a8x3t6 , caebr-a8x4h0 , caebr-a8x4u8 , caebr-a8x4w8 , caebr-a8x5l4 , caebr-a8x5l5 , caebr-a8x5r5 , caebr-a8x5s6 , caebr-a8x5t4 , caebr-a8x6s0 , caebr-a8x6s1 , caebr-a8x7d1 , caebr-a8x7h0 , caebr-a8x7v6 , caebr-A8X8P2 , caebr-a8x8q5 , caebr-a8x8y6 , caebr-a8x9s4 , caebr-a8x324.1 , caebr-a8x324.2 , caebr-a8x622 , caebr-a8xac7 , caebr-a8xag5 , caebr-a8xb07 , caebr-a8xb88 , caebr-a8xby0 , caebr-a8xdz0 , caebr-a8xf42 , caebr-a8xfd1 , caebr-a8xfe6 , caebr-a8xgi0 , caebr-a8xgz4 , caebr-a8xgz5 , caebr-a8xh38 , caebr-a8xhp8 , caebr-a8xhx9 , caebr-a8xjw4 , caebr-a8xk02 , caebr-a8xk46 , caebr-a8xk76 , caebr-a8xke1 , caebr-A8XLQ2 , caebr-a8xns2.1 , caebr-a8xns2.2 , caebr-a8xq21 , caebr-a8xub3 , caebr-a8xuc2 , caebr-a8xuc8 , caebr-a8xug3 , caebr-a8xuh6 , caebr-a8xui4 , caebr-a8xui5 , caebr-a8xui6 , caebr-a8xui7 , caebr-a8xum8 , caebr-a8y0h0.1 , caebr-a8y0h0.2 , caebr-a8y0h1.1 , caebr-a8y0h1.2 , caebr-a8y1b5 , caebr-a8y1r7 , caebr-a8y2v4 , caebr-a8y3e3 , caebr-a8y3i5 , caebr-a8y3j9 , caebr-a8y4p9 , caebr-a8y100 , caebr-a8y101 , caebr-ACHE1 , caebr-ACHE2 , caebr-ACHE3 , caebr-ACHE4 , caebr-b6ii84 , caebr-G01D9.5 , caebr-ges1e , caebr-a8y4l4 , caebr-A8Y1T9 , caebr-A8Y168 , caebr-A8Y0Z5 , caebr-A8XYQ5 , caebr-A8XXK4 , caebr-A8XWZ8 , caebr-A8XUF0 , caebr-A8XUB6 , caebr-A8XSV2 , caebr-A8XJ37 , caebr-A8XG15 , caebr-A8XFE8 , caebr-A8XEY7 , caebr-A8XEU8 , caebr-A8XDT6 , caebr-A8XDV3 , caebr-A8XDQ3 , caebr-A8XDK8 , caebr-A8XBW4 , caebr-A8XAG3 , caebr-A8X8H5 , caebr-A8X6Z9 , caebr-A8X6H9 , caebr-A8X629 , caebr-A8X438 , caebr-A8X4G2 , caebr-A8X4H8 , caebr-A8X4W2 , caebr-A8X3P4 , caebr-A8X3R1 , caebr-A8X2Z4 , caebr-A8X0N2 , caebr-A8X0B3 , caebr-A8WW80 , caebr-U483 , caebr-A8XPH6 , caebr-A8XNJ0 , caebr-A8XNA2 , caebr-A8XLP0 , caebr-A8XK33 , caebr-A8WTK6 , caebr-A8WU44 , caebr-A8WPJ2 , caebr-A8WNE5 , caebr-A8WMB3 , caebr-a8x1r2

Title : The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes - Skaletsky_2003_Nature_423_825
Author(s) : Skaletsky H , Kuroda-Kawaguchi T , Minx PJ , Cordum HS , Hillier L , Brown LG , Repping S , Pyntikova T , Ali J , Bieri T , Chinwalla A , Delehaunty A , Delehaunty K , Du H , Fewell G , Fulton L , Fulton R , Graves T , Hou SF , Latrielle P , Leonard S , Mardis E , Maupin R , McPherson J , Miner T , Nash W , Nguyen C , Ozersky P , Pepin K , Rock S , Rohlfing T , Scott K , Schultz B , Strong C , Tin-Wollam A , Yang SP , Waterston RH , Wilson RK , Rozen S , Page DC
Ref : Nature , 423 :825 , 2003
Abstract : The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes contain all 156 known transcription units, which include 78 protein-coding genes that collectively encode 27 distinct proteins. The X-transposed sequences exhibit 99% identity to the X chromosome. The X-degenerate sequences are remnants of ancient autosomes from which the modern X and Y chromosomes evolved. The ampliconic class includes large regions (about 30% of the MSY euchromatin) where sequence pairs show greater than 99.9% identity, which is maintained by frequent gene conversion (non-reciprocal transfer). The most prominent features here are eight massive palindromes, at least six of which contain testis genes.
ESTHER : Skaletsky_2003_Nature_423_825
PubMedSearch : Skaletsky_2003_Nature_423_825
PubMedID: 12815422
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-NLGN4Y

Title : The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7 - Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Graves TA , Pepin KH , Wagner-McPherson C , Layman D , Maas J , Jaeger S , Walker R , Wylie K , Sekhon M , Becker MC , O'Laughlin MD , Schaller ME , Fewell GA , Delehaunty KD , Miner TL , Nash WE , Cordes M , Du H , Sun H , Edwards J , Bradshaw-Cordum H , Ali J , Andrews S , Isak A , Vanbrunt A , Nguyen C , Du F , Lamar B , Courtney L , Kalicki J , Ozersky P , Bielicki L , Scott K , Holmes A , Harkins R , Harris A , Strong CM , Hou S , Tomlinson C , Dauphin-Kohlberg S , Kozlowicz-Reilly A , Leonard S , Rohlfing T , Rock SM , Tin-Wollam AM , Abbott A , Minx P , Maupin R , Strowmatt C , Latreille P , Miller N , Johnson D , Murray J , Woessner JP , Wendl MC , Yang SP , Schultz BR , Wallis JW , Spieth J , Bieri TA , Nelson JO , Berkowicz N , Wohldmann PE , Cook LL , Hickenbotham MT , Eldred J , Williams D , Bedell JA , Mardis ER , Clifton SW , Chissoe SL , Marra MA , Raymond C , Haugen E , Gillett W , Zhou Y , James R , Phelps K , Iadanoto S , Bubb K , Simms E , Levy R , Clendenning J , Kaul R , Kent WJ , Furey TS , Baertsch RA , Brent MR , Keibler E , Flicek P , Bork P , Suyama M , Bailey JA , Portnoy ME , Torrents D , Chinwalla AT , Gish WR , Eddy SR , McPherson JD , Olson MV , Eichler EE , Green ED , Waterston RH , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 424 :157 , 2003
Abstract : Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame.
ESTHER : Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
PubMedID: 12853948
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-CPVL , human-DPP6 , human-MEST

Title : Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 - McClelland_2001_Nature_413_852
Author(s) : McClelland M , Sanderson KE , Spieth J , Clifton SW , Latreille P , Courtney L , Porwollik S , Ali J , Dante M , Du F , Hou S , Layman D , Leonard S , Nguyen C , Scott K , Holmes A , Grewal N , Mulvaney E , Ryan E , Sun H , Florea L , Miller W , Stoneking T , Nhan M , Waterston R , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 413 :852 , 2001
Abstract : Salmonella enterica subspecies I, serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium), is a leading cause of human gastroenteritis, and is used as a mouse model of human typhoid fever. The incidence of non-typhoid salmonellosis is increasing worldwide, causing millions of infections and many deaths in the human population each year. Here we sequenced the 4,857-kilobase (kb) chromosome and 94-kb virulence plasmid of S. typhimurium strain LT2. The distribution of close homologues of S. typhimurium LT2 genes in eight related enterobacteria was determined using previously completed genomes of three related bacteria, sample sequencing of both S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. paratyphi A) and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and hybridization of three unsequenced genomes to a microarray of S. typhimurium LT2 genes. Lateral transfer of genes is frequent, with 11% of the S. typhimurium LT2 genes missing from S. enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi), and 29% missing from Escherichia coli K12. The 352 gene homologues of S. typhimurium LT2 confined to subspecies I of S. enterica-containing most mammalian and bird pathogens-are useful for studies of epidemiology, host specificity and pathogenesis. Most of these homologues were previously unknown, and 50 may be exported to the periplasm or outer membrane, rendering them accessible as therapeutic or vaccine targets.
ESTHER : McClelland_2001_Nature_413_852
PubMedSearch : McClelland_2001_Nature_413_852
PubMedID: 11677609
Gene_locus related to this paper: salen-OPDB , salti-q8z717 , salty-AES , salty-BIOH , salty-ENTF , salty-FES , salty-IROD , salty-IROE , salty-P74847 , salty-PLDB , salty-STM0332 , salty-STM2547 , salty-STM3079 , salty-STM4506 , salty-STY1441 , salty-STY2428 , salty-STY3846 , salty-yafa , salty-YBFF , salty-ycfp , salty-YFBB , salty-YHET , salty-YJFP , salty-YQIA

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 5 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Tabata_2000_Nature_408_823
Author(s) : Tabata S , Kaneko T , Nakamura Y , Kotani H , Kato T , Asamizu E , Miyajima N , Sasamoto S , Kimura T , Hosouchi T , Kawashima K , Kohara M , Matsumoto M , Matsuno A , Muraki A , Nakayama S , Nakazaki N , Naruo K , Okumura S , Shinpo S , Takeuchi C , Wada T , Watanabe A , Yamada M , Yasuda M , Sato S , de la Bastide M , Huang E , Spiegel L , Gnoj L , O'Shaughnessy A , Preston R , Habermann K , Murray J , Johnson D , Rohlfing T , Nelson J , Stoneking T , Pepin K , Spieth J , Sekhon M , Armstrong J , Becker M , Belter E , Cordum H , Cordes M , Courtney L , Courtney W , Dante M , Du H , Edwards J , Fryman J , Haakensen B , Lamar E , Latreille P , Leonard S , Meyer R , Mulvaney E , Ozersky P , Riley A , Strowmatt C , Wagner-McPherson C , Wollam A , Yoakum M , Bell M , Dedhia N , Parnell L , Shah R , Rodriguez M , See LH , Vil D , Baker J , Kirchoff K , Toth K , King L , Bahret A , Miller B , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR , Wilson RK , Murphy G , Bancroft I , Volckaert G , Wambutt R , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Pohl T , Entian KD , Terryn N , Hartley N , Bent E , Johnson S , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Zimmermann W , Ramsperger U , Wedler H , Balke K , Wedler E , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirkse W , Mooijman P , Lankhorst RK , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Rose M , Hauf J , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Villarroel R , Gielen J , Ardiles W , Bents O , Lemcke K , Kolesov G , Mayer K , Rudd S , Schoof H , Schueller C , Zaccaria P , Mewes HW , Bevan M , Fransz P
Ref : Nature , 408 :823 , 2000
Abstract : The genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been sequenced by an international collaboration, The Arabidopsis Genome Initiative. Here we report the complete sequence of chromosome 5. This chromosome is 26 megabases long; it is the second largest Arabidopsis chromosome and represents 21% of the sequenced regions of the genome. The sequence of chromosomes 2 and 4 have been reported previously and that of chromosomes 1 and 3, together with an analysis of the complete genome sequence, are reported in this issue. Analysis of the sequence of chromosome 5 yields further insights into centromere structure and the sequence determinants of heterochromatin condensation. The 5,874 genes encoded on chromosome 5 reveal several new functions in plants, and the patterns of gene organization provide insights into the mechanisms and extent of genome evolution in plants.
ESTHER : Tabata_2000_Nature_408_823
PubMedSearch : Tabata_2000_Nature_408_823
PubMedID: 11130714
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At5g11650 , arath-At5g16120 , arath-at5g18630 , arath-AT5G20520 , arath-At5g21950 , arath-AT5G27320 , arath-CXE15 , arath-F1N13.220 , arath-F14F8.240 , arath-q3e9e4 , arath-q8lae9 , arath-Q8LFB7 , arath-q9ffg7 , arath-q9fij5 , arath-Q9LVU7 , arath-q66gm8 , arath-SCPL34 , arath-B9DFR3 , arath-a0a1p8bcz0

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 4 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
Author(s) : Mayer K , Schuller C , Wambutt R , Murphy G , Volckaert G , Pohl T , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Entian KD , Terryn N , Harris B , Ansorge W , Brandt P , Grivell L , Rieger M , Weichselgartner M , de Simone V , Obermaier B , Mache R , Muller M , Kreis M , Delseny M , Puigdomenech P , Watson M , Schmidtheini T , Reichert B , Portatelle D , Perez-Alonso M , Boutry M , Bancroft I , Vos P , Hoheisel J , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Ridley P , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Bilham L , Robben J , Van der Schueren J , Grymonprez B , Chuang YJ , Vandenbussche F , Braeken M , Weltjens I , Voet M , Bastiaens I , Aert R , Defoor E , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Ramsperger U , Hilbert H , Braun M , Holzer E , Brandt A , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirske W , Mooijman P , Klein Lankhorst R , Rose M , Hauf J , Kotter P , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Van den Daele H , De Keyser A , Buysshaert C , Gielen J , Villarroel R , De Clercq R , van Montagu M , Rogers J , Cronin A , Quail M , Bray-Allen S , Clark L , Doggett J , Hall S , Kay M , Lennard N , McLay K , Mayes R , Pettett A , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Benes V , Rechmann S , Borkova D , Blocker H , Scharfe M , Grimm M , Lohnert TH , Dose S , de Haan M , Maarse A , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Fartmann B , Granderath K , Dauner D , Herzl A , Neumann S , Argiriou A , Vitale D , Liguori R , Piravandi E , Massenet O , Quigley F , Clabauld G , Mundlein A , Felber R , Schnabl S , Hiller R , Schmidt W , Lecharny A , Aubourg S , Chefdor F , Cooke R , Berger C , Montfort A , Casacuberta E , Gibbons T , Weber N , Vandenbol M , Bargues M , Terol J , Torres A , Perez-Perez A , Purnelle B , Bent E , Johnson S , Tacon D , Jesse T , Heijnen L , Schwarz S , Scholler P , Heber S , Francs P , Bielke C , Frishman D , Haase D , Lemcke K , Mewes HW , Stocker S , Zaccaria P , Bevan M , Wilson RK , de la Bastide M , Habermann K , Parnell L , Dedhia N , Gnoj L , Schutz K , Huang E , Spiegel L , Sehkon M , Murray J , Sheet P , Cordes M , Abu-Threideh J , Stoneking T , Kalicki J , Graves T , Harmon G , Edwards J , Latreille P , Courtney L , Cloud J , Abbott A , Scott K , Johnson D , Minx P , Bentley D , Fulton B , Miller N , Greco T , Kemp K , Kramer J , Fulton L , Mardis E , Dante M , Pepin K , Hillier L , Nelson J , Spieth J , Ryan E , Andrews S , Geisel C , Layman D , Du H , Ali J , Berghoff A , Jones K , Drone K , Cotton M , Joshu C , Antonoiu B , Zidanic M , Strong C , Sun H , Lamar B , Yordan C , Ma P , Zhong J , Preston R , Vil D , Shekher M , Matero A , Shah R , Swaby IK , O'Shaughnessy A , Rodriguez M , Hoffmann J , Till S , Granat S , Shohdy N , Hasegawa A , Hameed A , Lodhi M , Johnson A , Chen E , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR
Ref : Nature , 402 :769 , 1999
Abstract : The higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is an important model for identifying plant genes and determining their function. To assist biological investigations and to define chromosome structure, a coordinated effort to sequence the Arabidopsis genome was initiated in late 1996. Here we report one of the first milestones of this project, the sequence of chromosome 4. Analysis of 17.38 megabases of unique sequence, representing about 17% of the genome, reveals 3,744 protein coding genes, 81 transfer RNAs and numerous repeat elements. Heterochromatic regions surrounding the putative centromere, which has not yet been completely sequenced, are characterized by an increased frequency of a variety of repeats, new repeats, reduced recombination, lowered gene density and lowered gene expression. Roughly 60% of the predicted protein-coding genes have been functionally characterized on the basis of their homology to known genes. Many genes encode predicted proteins that are homologous to human and Caenorhabditis elegans proteins.
ESTHER : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedSearch : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedID: 10617198
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT4G00500 , arath-AT4G16690 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-AT4g30610 , arath-o65513 , arath-o65713 , arath-LPAAT , arath-f4jt64