Hawes AC

References (4)

Title : Subtle genetic changes enhance virulence of methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus - Highlander_2007_BMC.Microbiol_7_99
Author(s) : Highlander SK , Hulten KG , Qin X , Jiang H , Yerrapragada S , Mason EO, Jr. , Shang Y , Williams TM , Fortunov RM , Liu Y , Igboeli O , Petrosino J , Tirumalai M , Uzman A , Fox GE , Cardenas AM , Muzny DM , Hemphill L , Ding Y , Dugan S , Blyth PR , Buhay CJ , Dinh HH , Hawes AC , Holder M , Kovar CL , Lee SL , Liu W , Nazareth LV , Wang Q , Zhou J , Kaplan SL , Weinstock GM
Ref : BMC Microbiol , 7 :99 , 2007
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Community acquired (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) increasingly causes disease worldwide. USA300 has emerged as the predominant clone causing superficial and invasive infections in children and adults in the USA. Epidemiological studies suggest that USA300 is more virulent than other CA-MRSA. The genetic determinants that render virulence and dominance to USA300 remain unclear. RESULTS: We sequenced the genomes of two pediatric USA300 isolates: one CA-MRSA and one CA-methicillin susceptible (MSSA), isolated at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston. DNA sequencing was performed by Sanger dideoxy whole genome shotgun (WGS) and 454 Life Sciences pyrosequencing strategies. The sequence of the USA300 MRSA strain was rigorously annotated. In USA300-MRSA 2658 chromosomal open reading frames were predicted and 3.1 and 27 kilobase (kb) plasmids were identified. USA300-MSSA contained a 20 kb plasmid with some homology to the 27 kb plasmid found in USA300-MRSA. Two regions found in US300-MRSA were absent in USA300-MSSA. One of these carried the arginine deiminase operon that appears to have been acquired from S. epidermidis. The USA300 sequence was aligned with other sequenced S. aureus genomes and regions unique to USA300 MRSA were identified. CONCLUSION: USA300-MRSA is highly similar to other MRSA strains based on whole genome alignments and gene content, indicating that the differences in pathogenesis are due to subtle changes rather than to large-scale acquisition of virulence factor genes. The USA300 Houston isolate differs from another sequenced USA300 strain isolate, derived from a patient in San Francisco, in plasmid content and a number of sequence polymorphisms. Such differences will provide new insights into the evolution of pathogens.
ESTHER : Highlander_2007_BMC.Microbiol_7_99
PubMedSearch : Highlander_2007_BMC.Microbiol_7_99
PubMedID: 17986343
Gene_locus related to this paper: staa3-q2fkj0 , staau-LIP , staau-lipas , staau-MW0741 , staau-MW2456 , staau-q6gfm6 , staau-SA0011 , staau-SA0569 , staau-SA0572 , staau-SA0897 , staau-SA1143 , staau-SA2240 , staau-SA2306 , staau-SA2367 , staau-SA2422 , staau-SAV0321 , staau-SAV0446 , staau-SAV0457 , staau-SAV0655 , staau-SAV1014 , staau-SAV1765 , staau-SAV1793 , staau-SAV2188 , staau-SAV2350 , staau-SAV2594

Title : Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome - Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Rogers J , Katze MG , Bumgarner R , Weinstock GM , Mardis ER , Remington KA , Strausberg RL , Venter JC , Wilson RK , Batzer MA , Bustamante CD , Eichler EE , Hahn MW , Hardison RC , Makova KD , Miller W , Milosavljevic A , Palermo RE , Siepel A , Sikela JM , Attaway T , Bell S , Bernard KE , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Dao M , Davis C , Delehaunty KD , Ding Y , Dinh HH , Dugan-Rocha S , Fulton LA , Gabisi RA , Garner TT , Godfrey J , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Kirkness EF , Cree A , Fowler RG , Lee S , Lewis LR , Li Z , Liu YS , Moore SM , Muzny D , Nazareth LV , Ngo DN , Okwuonu GO , Pai G , Parker D , Paul HA , Pfannkoch C , Pohl CS , Rogers YH , Ruiz SJ , Sabo A , Santibanez J , Schneider BW , Smith SM , Sodergren E , Svatek AF , Utterback TR , Vattathil S , Warren W , White CS , Chinwalla AT , Feng Y , Halpern AL , Hillier LW , Huang X , Minx P , Nelson JO , Pepin KH , Qin X , Sutton GG , Venter E , Walenz BP , Wallis JW , Worley KC , Yang SP , Jones SM , Marra MA , Rocchi M , Schein JE , Baertsch R , Clarke L , Csuros M , Glasscock J , Harris RA , Havlak P , Jackson AR , Jiang H , Liu Y , Messina DN , Shen Y , Song HX , Wylie T , Zhang L , Birney E , Han K , Konkel MK , Lee J , Smit AF , Ullmer B , Wang H , Xing J , Burhans R , Cheng Z , Karro JE , Ma J , Raney B , She X , Cox MJ , Demuth JP , Dumas LJ , Han SG , Hopkins J , Karimpour-Fard A , Kim YH , Pollack JR , Vinar T , Addo-Quaye C , Degenhardt J , Denby A , Hubisz MJ , Indap A , Kosiol C , Lahn BT , Lawson HA , Marklein A , Nielsen R , Vallender EJ , Clark AG , Ferguson B , Hernandez RD , Hirani K , Kehrer-Sawatzki H , Kolb J , Patil S , Pu LL , Ren Y , Smith DG , Wheeler DA , Schenck I , Ball EV , Chen R , Cooper DN , Giardine B , Hsu F , Kent WJ , Lesk A , Nelson DL , O'Brien W E , Prufer K , Stenson PD , Wallace JC , Ke H , Liu XM , Wang P , Xiang AP , Yang F , Barber GP , Haussler D , Karolchik D , Kern AD , Kuhn RM , Smith KE , Zwieg AS
Ref : Science , 316 :222 , 2007
Abstract : The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedID: 17431167
Gene_locus related to this paper: macmu-3neur , macmu-ACHE , macmu-BCHE , macmu-f6rul6 , macmu-f6sz31 , macmu-f6the6 , macmu-f6unj2 , macmu-f6wtx1 , macmu-f6zkq5 , macmu-f7aa58 , macmu-f7ai42 , macmu-f7aim4 , macmu-f7buk8 , macmu-f7cfi8 , macmu-f7cnr2 , macmu-f7cu68 , macmu-f7flv1 , macmu-f7ggk1 , macmu-f7hir7 , macmu-g7n054 , macmu-KANSL3 , macmu-TEX30 , macmu-Y4neur , macmu-g7n4x3 , macmu-i2cy02 , macmu-f7ba84 , macmu-CES2 , macmu-h9er02 , macmu-a0a1d5rbr3 , macmu-a0a1d5q4k5 , macmu-g7mxj6 , macmu-f7dn71 , macmu-f7hkw9 , macmu-f7hm08 , macmu-g7mke4 , macmu-a0a1d5rh04 , macmu-h9fud6 , macmu-f6qwx1 , macmu-f7h4t2 , macmu-h9zaw9 , macmu-f7h550 , macmu-a0a1d5q9w1 , macmu-f7gkb9 , macmu-f7hp78 , macmu-a0a1d5qvu5

Title : The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3 - Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
Author(s) : Muzny DM , Scherer SE , Kaul R , Wang J , Yu J , Sudbrak R , Buhay CJ , Chen R , Cree A , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Gill R , Gunaratne P , Harris RA , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hodgson AV , Hume J , Jackson A , Khan ZM , Kovar-Smith C , Lewis LR , Lozado RJ , Metzker ML , Milosavljevic A , Miner GR , Morgan MB , Nazareth LV , Scott G , Sodergren E , Song XZ , Steffen D , Wei S , Wheeler DA , Wright MW , Worley KC , Yuan Y , Zhang Z , Adams CQ , Ansari-Lari MA , Ayele M , Brown MJ , Chen G , Chen Z , Clendenning J , Clerc-Blankenburg KP , Davis C , Delgado O , Dinh HH , Dong W , Draper H , Ernst S , Fu G , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Garcia DK , Gillett W , Gu J , Hao B , Haugen E , Havlak P , He X , Hennig S , Hu S , Huang W , Jackson LR , Jacob LS , Kelly SH , Kube M , Levy R , Li Z , Liu B , Liu J , Liu W , Lu J , Maheshwari M , Nguyen BV , Okwuonu GO , Palmeiri A , Pasternak S , Perez LM , Phelps KA , Plopper FJ , Qiang B , Raymond C , Rodriguez R , Saenphimmachak C , Santibanez J , Shen H , Shen Y , Subramanian S , Tabor PE , Verduzco D , Waldron L , Wang Q , Williams GA , Wong GK , Yao Z , Zhang J , Zhang X , Zhao G , Zhou J , Zhou Y , Nelson D , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Naylor SL , Yang H , Olson M , Weinstock G , Gibbs RA
Ref : Nature , 440 :1194 , 2006
Abstract : After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chromosomes. Chromosome 3 comprises just four contigs, one of which currently represents the longest unbroken stretch of finished DNA sequence known so far. The chromosome is remarkable in having the lowest rate of segmental duplication in the genome. It also includes a chemokine receptor gene cluster as well as numerous loci involved in multiple human cancers such as the gene encoding FHIT, which contains the most common constitutive fragile site in the genome, FRA3B. Using genomic sequence from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque, we were able to characterize the breakpoints defining a large pericentric inversion that occurred some time after the split of Homininae from Ponginae, and propose an evolutionary history of the inversion.
ESTHER : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedSearch : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedID: 16641997
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-AADACL2 , human-ABHD5 , human-ABHD6 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD14A , human-APEH , human-BCHE , human-CIB , human-LIPH , human-MGLL , human-NLGN1 , human-PLA1A

Title : Complete genome sequence of Rickettsia typhi and comparison with sequences of other rickettsiae - McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
Author(s) : McLeod MP , Qin X , Karpathy SE , Gioia J , Highlander SK , Fox GE , McNeill TZ , Jiang H , Muzny D , Jacob LS , Hawes AC , Sodergren E , Gill R , Hume J , Morgan M , Fan G , Amin AG , Gibbs RA , Hong C , Yu XJ , Walker DH , Weinstock GM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 186 :5842 , 2004
Abstract : Rickettsia typhi, the causative agent of murine typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium with a life cycle involving both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Here we present the complete genome sequence of R. typhi (1,111,496 bp) and compare it to the two published rickettsial genome sequences: R. prowazekii and R. conorii. We identified 877 genes in R. typhi encoding 3 rRNAs, 33 tRNAs, 3 noncoding RNAs, and 838 proteins, 3 of which are frameshifts. In addition, we discovered more than 40 pseudogenes, including the entire cytochrome c oxidase system. The three rickettsial genomes share 775 genes: 23 are found only in R. prowazekii and R. typhi, 15 are found only in R. conorii and R. typhi, and 24 are unique to R. typhi. Although most of the genes are colinear, there is a 35-kb inversion in gene order, which is close to the replication terminus, in R. typhi, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. In addition, we found a 124-kb R. typhi-specific inversion, starting 19 kb from the origin of replication, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. Inversions in this region are also seen in the unpublished genome sequences of R. sibirica and R. rickettsii, indicating that this region is a hot spot for rearrangements. Genome comparisons also revealed a 12-kb insertion in the R. prowazekii genome, relative to R. typhi and R. conorii, which appears to have occurred after the typhus (R. prowazekii and R. typhi) and spotted fever (R. conorii) groups diverged. The three-way comparison allowed further in silico analysis of the SpoT split genes, leading us to propose that the stringent response system is still functional in these rickettsiae.
ESTHER : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedSearch : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedID: 15317790
Gene_locus related to this paper: ricco-PTRB , ricty-q68vs9 , ricty-q68w06 , ricty-q68w12 , ricty-q68w56 , ricty-q68wq9 , ricty-q68wt4 , ricty-q68x29 , ricty-q68xj3