Luo M

References (19)

Title : Developing a Two-Photon AND Logic Probe and Its Application in Alzheimer's Disease Differentiation - Guo_2023_Anal.Chem__
Author(s) : Guo J , Sun J , Liu D , Liu J , Gui L , Luo M , Kong D , Wusiman S , Yang C , Liu T , Yuan Z , Li R
Ref : Analytical Chemistry , : , 2023
Abstract : In Alzheimer's disease, hypochlorous acid involved in the clearance of invading bacteria or pathogens and butyrylcholinesterase engaged in the hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine are relatively significantly altered. However, there are few dual detection probes for hypochlorous acid and butyrylcholinesterase. In addition, single-response probes suffer from serious off-target effects and near-infrared probes do not easily penetrate the blood-brain barrier due to their excessive molecular weight. In this work, we constructed a two-photon fluorescent probe that recognizes hypochlorous acid and butyrylcholinesterase based on a dual-lock strategy. The thiocarbonyl group is oxidized in the presence of hypochlorous acid, and the hydrolysis occurs at the 7-position ester bond in the existence of butyrylcholinesterase, releasing a strongly fluorescent fluorophore, 4-methylumbelliferone. Excellent imaging was performed in PC12 cells using this probe, and deep two-photon imaging was observed in the brains of AD mice after tail vein injection with this probe. It indicates that the probe can provide a promising tool for the more precise diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.
ESTHER : Guo_2023_Anal.Chem__
PubMedSearch : Guo_2023_Anal.Chem__
PubMedID: 37947381

Title : Pathogenicity of Beauveria bassiana PfBb and Immune Responses of a Non-Target Host, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) - Gao_2022_Insects_13_
Author(s) : Gao YP , Luo M , Wang XY , He XZ , Lu W , Zheng XL
Ref : Insects , 13 : , 2022
Abstract : Exploring the pathogenicity of a new fungus strain to non-target host pests can provide essential information on a large scale for potential application in pest control. In this study, we tested the pathogenicity of Beauveria bassiana PfBb on the important agricultural pest Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) by determining the relative activities of protective enzymes and detoxifying enzymes in different larval instars. Our results show that the B. bassiana PfBb strain could infect all six larval instars of S. frugiperda, and its virulence to S. frugiperda larvae gradually increased with an increase in spore concentration. Seven days after inoculation, the LC(50) of B. bassiana PfBb was 7.7 x 10(5), 5.5 x 10(6), 2.2 x 10(7), 3.1 x 10(8), 9.6 x 10(8), and 2.5 x 10(11) spores/mL for first to sixth instars of S. frugiperda, respectively, and the LC(50) and LC(90) of B. bassiana PfBb for each S. frugiperda instar decreased with infection time, indicating a significant dose effect. Furthermore, the virulence of B. bassiana PfBb to S. frugiperda larvae gradually decreased with an increase in larval instar. The activities of protective enzymes (i.e., catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) and detoxifying enzymes (i.e., glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterase, and cytochrome P450) in S. frugiperda larvae of the first three instars infected with B. bassiana PfBb changed significantly with infection time, but such variations were not obvious in the fifth and sixth instars. Additionally, after being infected with B. bassiana PfBb, the activities of protective enzymes and detoxification enzymes in S. frugiperda larvae usually lasted from 12 to 48 h, which was significantly longer than the control. These results indicate that the pathogenicity of B. bassiana PfBb on the non-target host S. frugiperda was significant but depended on the instar stage. Therefore, the findings of this study suggest that B. bassiana PfBb can be used as a bio-insecticide to control young larvae of S. frugiperda in an integrated pest management program.
ESTHER : Gao_2022_Insects_13_
PubMedSearch : Gao_2022_Insects_13_
PubMedID: 36292862

Title : Glycerol is Released from a New Path in MGL Lipase Catalytic Process - Lan_2021_J.Chem.Inf.Model__
Author(s) : Lan D , Li S , Tang W , Zhao Z , Luo M , Yuan S , Xu J , Wang Y
Ref : J Chem Inf Model , : , 2021
Abstract : Traditionally, it is believed that the substrate and products of a monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) share the same path to enter and exit the catalytic site. Glycerol (a product of MGL), however, was recently hypothesized to be released through a different path. In order to improve the catalytic efficacy and thermo-stability of MGL, it is important to articulate the pathways of a MGL products releasing. In this study, with structure biological approaches, biochemical experiments, and in silico methods, we prove that glycerol is released from a different path in the catalytic site indeed. The fatty acid (another product of MGL) does share the same binding path with the substrate. This discovery paves a new road to design MGL inhibitors or optimize MGL catalytic efficacy.
ESTHER : Lan_2021_J.Chem.Inf.Model__
PubMedSearch : Lan_2021_J.Chem.Inf.Model__
PubMedID: 34873908

Title : COX-2\/sEH Dual Inhibitor PTUPB Alleviates CCl (4) -Induced Liver Fibrosis and Portal Hypertension - Zhao_2021_Front.Med.(Lausanne)_8_761517
Author(s) : Zhao Z , Zhang C , Lin J , Zheng L , Li H , Qi X , Huo H , Lou X , Hammock BD , Hwang SH , Bao Y , Luo M
Ref : Front Med (Lausanne) , 8 :761517 , 2021
Abstract : Background: 4-(5-phenyl-3-{3-[3-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)-ureido]-propyl}-pyrazol-1-yl) -benzenesulfonamide (PTUPB), a dual cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor, was found to alleviate renal, pulmonary fibrosis and liver injury. However, few is known about the effect of PTUPB on liver cirrhosis. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of PTUPB in liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension (PHT). Method: Rat liver cirrhosis model was established via subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) for 16 weeks. The experimental group received oral administration of PTUPB (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. We subsequently analyzed portal pressure (PP), liver fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and intra- or extrahepatic vascular remodeling. Additionally, network pharmacology was used to investigate the possible mechanisms of PTUPB in live fibrosis. Results: CCl(4) exposure induced liver fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and PHT, and PTUPB alleviated these changes. PTUPB decreased PP from 17.50 +/- 4.65 to 6.37 +/- 1.40 mmHg, reduced collagen deposition and profibrotic factor. PTUPB alleviated the inflammation and bile duct proliferation, as indicated by decrease in serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), liver cytokeratin 19 (CK-19), transaminase, and macrophage infiltration. PTUPB also restored vessel wall thickness of superior mesenteric arteries (SMA) and inhibited intra- or extrahepatic angiogenesis and vascular remodeling via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), von Willebrand factor (vWF), etc. Moreover, PTUPB induced sinusoidal vasodilation by upregulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1). In enrichment analysis, PTUPB engaged in multiple biological functions related to cirrhosis, including blood pressure, tissue remodeling, immunological inflammation, macrophage activation, and fibroblast proliferation. Additionally, PTUPB suppressed hepatic expression of sEH, COX-2, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Conclusion: 4-(5-phenyl-3-{3-[3-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)-ureido]-propyl}-pyrazol-1-yl)- benzenesulfonamide ameliorated liver fibrosis and PHT by inhibiting fibrotic deposition, inflammation, angiogenesis, sinusoidal, and SMA remodeling. The molecular mechanism may be mediated via the downregulation of the sEH/COX-2/TGF-beta.
ESTHER : Zhao_2021_Front.Med.(Lausanne)_8_761517
PubMedSearch : Zhao_2021_Front.Med.(Lausanne)_8_761517
PubMedID: 35004731

Title : Characteristics of lipid droplets and the expression of proteins involved in lipolysis in the murine cervix during mid-pregnancy - Tao_2020_Reprod.Fertil.Dev_32_967
Author(s) : Tao L , Zhang H , Wang H , Li L , Huang L , Su F , Yuan X , Luo M , Ge L
Ref : Reprod Fertil Dev , 32 :967 , 2020
Abstract : Lipid droplets (LDs) are reservoirs of arachidonoyl lipids for prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis, and progesterone can stimulate PGE2 synthesis; however, the relationship between progesterone and LD metabolism in the murine cervix remains unclear. In the present study we examined LD distribution and changes in the expression of proteins involved in lipolysis and autophagy in the murine cervix during pregnancy, and compared the findings with those in dioestrous mice. During mid-pregnancy, LDs were predominantly distributed in the cervical epithelium. Electron microscopy revealed the transfer of numerous LDs from the basal to apical region in the luminal epithelium, marked catabolism of LDs, an elevated number of LDs and autophagosomes and a higher LD:mitochondrion size ratio in murine cervical epithelial cells (P<0.05). In addition, immunohistochemical and western blotting analyses showed significantly higher cAMP-dependent protein kinase, adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase expression, and a higher light chain 3 (LC3) II:LC3I ratio in the stroma and smooth muscles and, particularly, in murine cervical epithelial cells, during mid-pregnancy than late dioestrus. In conclusion, these results suggest that the enhanced lipolysis of LDs and autophagy in murine cervical tissues were closely related to pregnancy and were possibly controlled by progesterone because LD catabolism may be necessary for energy provision and PGE2 synthesis to maintain a closed pregnant cervix.
ESTHER : Tao_2020_Reprod.Fertil.Dev_32_967
PubMedSearch : Tao_2020_Reprod.Fertil.Dev_32_967
PubMedID: 32693909

Title : Surfactant Charge Modulates Structure and Stability of Lipase-Embedded Monolayers at Marine-Relevant Aerosol Surfaces - Luo_2019_Langmuir_35_9050
Author(s) : Luo M , Dommer AC , Schiffer JM , Rez DJ , Mitchell AR , Amaro RE , Grassian VH
Ref : Langmuir , 35 :9050 , 2019
Abstract : Lipases, as well as other enzymes, are present and active within the sea surface microlayer (SSML). Upon bubble bursting, lipases partition into sea spray aerosol (SSA) along with surface-active molecules such as lipids. Lipases are likely to be embedded in the lipid monolayer at the SSA surface and thus have the potential to influence SSA interfacial structure and chemistry. Elucidating the structure of the lipid monolayer at SSA interfaces and how this structure is altered upon interaction with a protein system like lipase is of interest, given the importance of how aerosols interact with sunlight, influence cloud formation, and provide surfaces for chemical reactions. Herein, we report an integrated experimental and computational study of Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) embedded in a lipid monolayer and highlight the important role of electrostatic, rather than hydrophobic, interactions as a driver for monolayer stability. Specifically, we combine Langmuir film experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the detailed interactions between the zwitterionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayer and BCL. Upon insertion of BCL from the underlying subphase into the lipid monolayer, it is shown that BCL permeates and largely disorders the monolayer while strongly interacting with zwitterionic DPPC molecules, as experimentally observed by Langmuir adsorption curves and infrared reflectance absorbance spectroscopy. Explicitly solvated, all-atom MD is then used to provide insights into inter- and intramolecular interactions that drive these observations, with specific attention to the formation of salt bridges or ionic-bonding interactions. We show that after insertion into the DPPC monolayer, lipase is maintained at high surface pressures and in large BCL concentrations by forming a salt-bridge-stabilized lipase-DPPC complex. In comparison, when embedded in an anionic monolayer at low surface pressures, BCL preferentially forms intramolecular salt bridges, reducing its total favorable interactions with the surfactant and partitioning out of the monolayer shortly after injection. Overall, this study shows that the structure and dynamics of lipase-embedded SSA surfaces vary based on surface charge and pressure and that these variations have the potential to differentially modulate the properties of marine aerosols.
ESTHER : Luo_2019_Langmuir_35_9050
PubMedSearch : Luo_2019_Langmuir_35_9050
PubMedID: 31188612

Title : Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition with t-TUCB alleviates liver fibrosis and portal pressure in carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis in rats - Zhang_2018_Clin.Res.Hepatol.Gastroenterol_42_118
Author(s) : Zhang CH , Zheng L , Gui L , Lin JY , Zhu YM , Deng WS , Luo M
Ref : Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol , 42 :118 , 2018
Abstract : BACKGROUND/AIMS: Fibrosis and increased intrahepatic vascular resistance are the hallmarks of chronic inflammatory disorders of the liver and cirrhosis. Inhibitors of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase reduce fibrosis in several disease models. The present study aimed at investigating the effects of soluble epoxyhydrolase inhibition with t-TUCB in tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis in rats. METHODS: The models were established by CCl4 (2ml/kg) given subcutaneously for 14 weeks. t-TUCB was concomitantly administered from the tenth week of modelling time. After the models were successfully built, the rats were anesthetized with sodium phenobarbital and portal pressure was determined in the groups. After that, the rats were killed and part of liver tissues were taken for histological analysis. In addition, the levels of intrahepatic inflammatory message factors were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. The remaining liver samples were processed for assessment of oxidative stress. RESULTS: t-TUCB administration significantly attenuated portal pressure relative to CCl4-only rats. This improvement was associated with decreased deposition of collagen in liver, which was supported by reduced mRNA expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), Collagen I, Collagen III, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and increased matrix metalloproteinase-1, -13 (MMP-1, -13) mRNA expression. In addition, t-TUCB decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and NF-kappaB, within cirrhotic hepatic tissue. Meanwhile, oxidative stress was also alleviated following inhibition of sEH in CCl4-induced models, as evidenced by down-regulated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and up-regulated levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). CONCLUSION: The soluble epoxyhydrolase inhibitor, t-TUCB alleviates liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through attenuation of inflammatory response and oxidative stress in tetrachloride induced cirrhosis.
ESTHER : Zhang_2018_Clin.Res.Hepatol.Gastroenterol_42_118
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2018_Clin.Res.Hepatol.Gastroenterol_42_118
PubMedID: 29031875

Title : Impacts of Lipase Enzyme on the Surface Properties of Marine Aerosols - Schiffer_2018_J.Phys.Chem.Lett_9_3839
Author(s) : Schiffer JM , Luo M , Dommer AC , Thoron G , Pendergraft M , Santander MV , Lucero D , Pecora de Barros E , Prather KA , Grassian VH , Amaro RE
Ref : J Phys Chem Lett , 9 :3839 , 2018
Abstract : Triacylglycerol lipases have recently been shown to be transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere in atmospheric sea spray aerosol (SSA). Lipases have the potential to alter the composition of SSA; however, the structure and properties of enzymes in the high salt, high ionic strength, and low pH conditions found in SSA have never been explored. Here, we study the dynamics of Burkholderia cepacia triacylglycerol lipase (BCL) at SSA model surfaces comprised of palmitic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA), two commonly found lipids at SSA surfaces. Surface adsorption Langmuir isotherm experiments and all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations together illuminate how and why BCL expands the ordering of lipids at palmitic acid surfaces the most at pH < 4 and the least in DPPA surfaces at pH 6. Taken together, these results represent a first glimpse into the complex interplay between lipid surface structure and protein dynamics within enzyme-containing aerosols.
ESTHER : Schiffer_2018_J.Phys.Chem.Lett_9_3839
PubMedSearch : Schiffer_2018_J.Phys.Chem.Lett_9_3839
PubMedID: 29916254

Title : The asparagus genome sheds light on the origin and evolution of a young Y chromosome - Harkess_2017_Nat.Commun_8_1279
Author(s) : Harkess A , Zhou J , Xu C , Bowers JE , Van der Hulst R , Ayyampalayam S , Mercati F , Riccardi P , McKain MR , Kakrana A , Tang H , Ray J , Groenendijk J , Arikit S , Mathioni SM , Nakano M , Shan H , Telgmann-Rauber A , Kanno A , Yue Z , Chen H , Li W , Chen Y , Xu X , Zhang Y , Luo S , Gao J , Mao Z , Pires JC , Luo M , Kudrna D , Wing RA , Meyers BC , Yi K , Kong H , Lavrijsen P , Sunseri F , Falavigna A , Ye Y , Leebens-Mack JH , Chen G
Ref : Nat Commun , 8 :1279 , 2017
Abstract : Sex chromosomes evolved from autosomes many times across the eukaryote phylogeny. Several models have been proposed to explain this transition, some involving male and female sterility mutations linked in a region of suppressed recombination between X and Y (or Z/W, U/V) chromosomes. Comparative and experimental analysis of a reference genome assembly for a double haploid YY male garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) individual implicates separate but linked genes as responsible for sex determination. Dioecy has evolved recently within Asparagus and sex chromosomes are cytogenetically identical with the Y, harboring a megabase segment that is missing from the X. We show that deletion of this entire region results in a male-to-female conversion, whereas loss of a single suppressor of female development drives male-to-hermaphrodite conversion. A single copy anther-specific gene with a male sterile Arabidopsis knockout phenotype is also in the Y-specific region, supporting a two-gene model for sex chromosome evolution.
ESTHER : Harkess_2017_Nat.Commun_8_1279
PubMedSearch : Harkess_2017_Nat.Commun_8_1279
PubMedID: 29093472
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspof-a0a5p1ew48

Title : Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase lowers portal hypertension in cirrhotic rats by ameliorating endothelial dysfunction and liver fibrosis - Deng_2017_Prostaglandins.Other.Lipid.Mediat_131_67
Author(s) : Deng W , Zhu Y , Lin J , Zheng L , Zhang C , Luo M
Ref : Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat , 131 :67 , 2017
Abstract : Epoxyeicostrienoic acids (EETs) are arachidonic acid derived meditators which are catalyzed by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to less active dihydroeicostrienoics acids (DHETS). The aim of our study is to investigate the effects of sEH inhibition on hepatic and systemic hemodynamics, hepatic endothelial dysfunction, and hepatic fibrosis in CCl4 cirrhotic rats. The sEH inhibitor,trans-4-{4-[3-(4-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)-ureido]cyclohexyloxy}benzoic acid (t-TUCB) was administered to stabilize hepatic EETs by gavage at a dose of 1mg/kg/d. Our results showed that hepatic sEH expression was markedly increased in portal hypertension, and led to a lower ratio of EETs/DHETs which was effectively reversed by t-TUCB administration. t-TUCB significantly decreased portal pressure without significant changes in systemic hemodynamics, which was associated with the attenuation of intrahepatic vascular resistance (IHVR) and liver fibrosis. t-TUCB ameliorated endothelial dysfunction, increased hepatic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production. In addition, t-TUCB significantly reduced alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (alpha-SMA) expression and liver fibrosis, which was associated with a decrease in NF-kappaB signaling. Taken together, inhibition of sEH reduces portal pressure, liver fibrosis and attenuates hepatic endothelial dysfunction in cirrhotic rats. Our results indicate that sEH inhbitors may be useful in the treatment of portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.
ESTHER : Deng_2017_Prostaglandins.Other.Lipid.Mediat_131_67
PubMedSearch : Deng_2017_Prostaglandins.Other.Lipid.Mediat_131_67
PubMedID: 28822809

Title : Sequence homolog-based molecular engineering for shifting the enzymatic pH optimum - Ma_2016_Synth.Syst.Biotechnol_1_195
Author(s) : Ma F , Xie Y , Luo M , Wang S , Hu Y , Liu Y , Feng Y , Yang GY
Ref : Synth Syst Biotechnol , 1 :195 , 2016
Abstract : Cell-free synthetic biology system organizes multiple enzymes (parts) from different sources to implement unnatural catalytic functions. Highly adaption between the catalytic parts is crucial for building up efficient artificial biosynthetic systems. Protein engineering is a powerful technology to tailor various enzymatic properties including catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity, temperature adaptation and even achieve new catalytic functions. However, altering enzymatic pH optimum still remains a challenging task. In this study, we proposed a novel sequence homolog-based protein engineering strategy for shifting the enzymatic pH optimum based on statistical analyses of sequence-function relationship data of enzyme family. By two statistical procedures, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso), five amino acids in GH11 xylanase family were identified to be related to the evolution of enzymatic pH optimum. Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermophilic xylanase from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii revealed that four out of five mutations could alter the enzymatic pH optima toward acidic condition without compromising the catalytic activity and thermostability. Combination of the positive mutants resulted in the best mutant M31 that decreased its pH optimum for 1.5 units and showed increased catalytic activity at pH < 5.0 compared to the wild-type enzyme. Structure analysis revealed that all the mutations are distant from the active center, which may be difficult to be identified by conventional rational design strategy. Interestingly, the four mutation sites are clustered at a certain region of the enzyme, suggesting a potential 'hot zone' for regulating the pH optima of xylanases. This study provides an efficient method of modulating enzymatic pH optima based on statistical sequence analyses, which can facilitate the design and optimization of suitable catalytic parts for the construction of complicated cell-free synthetic biology systems.
ESTHER : Ma_2016_Synth.Syst.Biotechnol_1_195
PubMedSearch : Ma_2016_Synth.Syst.Biotechnol_1_195
PubMedID: 29062943

Title : EET-dependent potentiation of pulmonary arterial pressure: Sex different regulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase - Kandhi_2015_Am.J.Physiol.Lung.Cell.Mol.Physiol__ajplung 00208 2015
Author(s) : Kandhi S , Qin J , Froogh G , Jiang H , Luo M , Wolin MS , Huang A , Sun D
Ref : American Journal of Physiology Lung Cell Mol Physiol , :ajplung 00208 2015 , 2015
Abstract : We tested the hypothesis that suppression of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) metabolism via genetic knockout of the gene for soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH-KO), or female-specific downregulation of sEH expression, plays a role in the potentiation of pulmonary hypertension. We used male (M) and female (F) wild type (WT) and sEH-KO mice; the latter have high pulmonary EETs. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in control, and in response to in vivo administration of U46619 (thromboxane analogue), 14,15-EET, and 14,15-EEZE (antagonist of EETs) were recorded. Basal RVSP was comparable among all groups of mice, whereas MABP was significantly lower in F-WT than M-WT mice, and further reduced predominantly in F-KO compared to M-KO mice. U46619 dose-dependently increased RVSP and MABP in all groups of mice. The increase in RVSP was significantly greater and coincided with smaller increases in MABP in M-KO and F-WT mice compared to M-WT mice. In F-KO mice, the elevation of RVSP by U46619 was even higher than M-KO and F-WT mice, associated with the least increase in MABP. 14,15-EEZE prevented the augmentation of U46619-induced elevation of RVSP in sEH-KO mice, whereas, 14,15-EET-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction was comparable in all groups of mice. sEH expression in the lungs was reduced, paralleled with higher levels of EETs in F-WT compared to M-WT mice. In summary, EETs initiate pulmonary vasoconstriction but act as vasodilators systemically. High pulmonary EETs, as a function of downregulation or deletion of sEH, potentiate U46619-induced increases in RVSP in a female-susceptible manner.
ESTHER : Kandhi_2015_Am.J.Physiol.Lung.Cell.Mol.Physiol__ajplung 00208 2015
PubMedSearch : Kandhi_2015_Am.J.Physiol.Lung.Cell.Mol.Physiol__ajplung 00208 2015
PubMedID: 26498250

Title : Genomic information of the arsenic-resistant bacterium Lysobacter arseniciresistens type strain ZS79(T) and comparison of Lysobacter draft genomes - Liu_2015_Stand.Genomic.Sci_10_88
Author(s) : Liu L , Zhang S , Luo M , Wang G
Ref : Stand Genomic Sci , 10 :88 , 2015
Abstract : Lysobacter arseniciresistens ZS79(T) is a highly arsenic-resistant,rod-shaped, motile, non-spore-forming, aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium. In this study, four Lysobacter type strains were sequenced and the genomic information of L. arseniciresistens ZS79(T) and the comparative genomics results of the Lysobacter strains were described. The draft genome sequence of the strain ZS79(T) consists of 3,086,721 bp and is distributed in 109 contigs. It has a G+C content of 69.5 % and contains 2,363 protein-coding genes including eight arsenic resistant genes.
ESTHER : Liu_2015_Stand.Genomic.Sci_10_88
PubMedSearch : Liu_2015_Stand.Genomic.Sci_10_88
PubMedID: 26516404
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9gamm-a0a0a0f4f2

Title : Type II thioesterase gene (ECO-orf27) from Amycolatopsis orientalis influences production of the polyketide antibiotic, ECO-0501 (LW01) - Shen_2012_Biotechnol.Lett_34_2087
Author(s) : Shen Y , Huang H , Zhu L , Luo M , Chen D
Ref : Biotechnol Lett , 34 :2087 , 2012
Abstract : ECO-orf27 associated with the cluster of ECO-0501 (LW01) from Amycolatopsis orientalis is deduced to encode a type II thioesterase. Disruption of ECO-orf27 reduced LW01 production by 95 %. Complementation of the disrupted mutant with intact ECO-orf27 restored the production of LW01 suggesting that ECO-orf27 is crucial for LW01 biosynthesis. ECO-TE I, the gene encoding type I thioesterase from LW01 polyketide synthases, cannot complement ECO-orf27 deficient mutant distinguishing ECO-orf27 from type I thioesterase gene. Type II thioesterase gene pikAV from Streptomyces venezuelae could complement ECO-orf27 in A. orientalis indicating that the two genes are equivalent in their function. Overexpression of ECO-orf27 resulted in a 20 % increase in LW01 production providing an alternative approach for yield improvement.
ESTHER : Shen_2012_Biotechnol.Lett_34_2087
PubMedSearch : Shen_2012_Biotechnol.Lett_34_2087
PubMedID: 22850790

Title : Cell type-specific channelrhodopsin-2 transgenic mice for optogenetic dissection of neural circuitry function - Zhao_2011_Nat.Methods_8_745
Author(s) : Zhao S , Ting JT , Atallah HE , Qiu L , Tan J , Gloss B , Augustine GJ , Deisseroth K , Luo M , Graybiel AM , Feng G
Ref : Nat Methods , 8 :745 , 2011
Abstract : Optogenetic methods have emerged as powerful tools for dissecting neural circuit connectivity, function and dysfunction. We used a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic strategy to express the H134R variant of channelrhodopsin-2, ChR2(H134R), under the control of cell type-specific promoter elements. We performed an extensive functional characterization of the newly established VGAT-ChR2(H134R)-EYFP, ChAT-ChR2(H134R)-EYFP, Tph2-ChR2(H134R)-EYFP and Pvalb(H134R)-ChR2-EYFP BAC transgenic mouse lines and demonstrate the utility of these lines for precisely controlling action-potential firing of GABAergic, cholinergic, serotonergic and parvalbumin-expressing neuron subsets using blue light. This resource of cell type-specific ChR2(H134R) mouse lines will facilitate the precise mapping of neuronal connectivity and the dissection of the neural basis of behavior.
ESTHER : Zhao_2011_Nat.Methods_8_745
PubMedSearch : Zhao_2011_Nat.Methods_8_745
PubMedID: 21985008

Title : CD26\/dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26\/DPPIV) is highly expressed in peripheral blood of HIV-1 exposed uninfected female sex workers - Songok_2010_Virol.J_7_343
Author(s) : Songok EM , Osero B , McKinnon L , Rono MK , Apidi W , Matey EJ , Meyers AF , Luo M , Kimani J , Wachihi C , Ball BT , Plummer FA , Mpoke S
Ref : Virol J , 7 :343 , 2010
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Design of effective vaccines against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) continues to present formidable challenges. However, individuals who are exposed HIV-1 but do not get infected may reveal correlates of protection that may inform on effective vaccine design. A preliminary gene expression analysis of HIV resistant female sex workers (HIV-R) suggested a high expression CD26/DPPIV gene. Previous studies have indicated an anti-HIV effect of high CD26/DPPIV expressing cells in vitro. Similarly, high CD26/DPPIV protein levels in vivo have been shown to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. We carried out a study to confirm if the high CD26/DPPIV gene expression among the HIV-R were concordant with high blood protein levels and its correlation with clinical type 2 diabetes and other perturbations in the insulin signaling pathway. RESULTS: A quantitative CD26/DPPIV plasma analysis from 100 HIV-R, 100 HIV infected (HIV +) and 100 HIV negative controls (HIV Neg) showed a significantly elevated CD26/DPPIV concentration among the HIV-R group (mean 1315 ng/ml) than the HIV Neg (910 ng/ml) and HIV + (870 ng/ml, p < 0.001). Similarly a FACs analysis of cell associated DPPIV (CD26) revealed a higher CD26/DPPIV expression on CD4+ T-cells derived from HIV-R than from the HIV+ (90.30% vs 80.90 p = 0.002) and HIV Neg controls (90.30% vs 82.30 p < 0.001) respectively. A further comparison of the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of CD26/DPPIV expression showed a higher DPP4 MFI on HIV-R CD4+ T cells (median 118 vs 91 for HIV-Neg, p = 0.0003). An evaluation for hyperglycemia, did not confirm Type 2 diabetes but an impaired fasting glucose condition (5.775 mmol/L). A follow-up quantitative PCR analysis of the insulin signaling pathway genes showed a down expression of NFkappaB, a central mediator of the immune response and activator of HIV-1 transcription. CONCLUSION: HIV resistant sex workers have a high expression of CD26/DPPIV in tandem with lowered immune activation markers. This may suggest a novel role for CD26/DPPIV in protection against HIV infection in vivo.
ESTHER : Songok_2010_Virol.J_7_343
PubMedSearch : Songok_2010_Virol.J_7_343
PubMedID: 21108831

Title : De Novo Next Generation Sequencing of Plant Genomes - Rounsley_2009_Rice_2_35
Author(s) : Rounsley S , Marri PR , Yu Y , He R , Sisneros N , Goicoechea JL , Lee SJ , Angelova A , Kudrna D , Luo M , Affourtit J , Desany B , Knight J , Niazi F , Egholm M , Wing RA
Ref : Rice , 2 :35 , 2009
Abstract :
ESTHER : Rounsley_2009_Rice_2_35
PubMedSearch : Rounsley_2009_Rice_2_35
PubMedID:
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q0JK71 , orysj-q6yse8 , orysa-q65xp3 , 9oryz-a0a0e0aui2 , orysi-b8bly4 , 9oryz-a0a0d9zru5

Title : Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny - Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
Author(s) : Clark AG , Eisen MB , Smith DR , Bergman CM , Oliver B , Markow TA , Kaufman TC , Kellis M , Gelbart W , Iyer VN , Pollard DA , Sackton TB , Larracuente AM , Singh ND , Abad JP , Abt DN , Adryan B , Aguade M , Akashi H , Anderson WW , Aquadro CF , Ardell DH , Arguello R , Artieri CG , Barbash DA , Barker D , Barsanti P , Batterham P , Batzoglou S , Begun D , Bhutkar A , Blanco E , Bosak SA , Bradley RK , Brand AD , Brent MR , Brooks AN , Brown RH , Butlin RK , Caggese C , Calvi BR , Bernardo de Carvalho A , Caspi A , Castrezana S , Celniker SE , Chang JL , Chapple C , Chatterji S , Chinwalla A , Civetta A , Clifton SW , Comeron JM , Costello JC , Coyne JA , Daub J , David RG , Delcher AL , Delehaunty K , Do CB , Ebling H , Edwards K , Eickbush T , Evans JD , Filipski A , Findeiss S , Freyhult E , Fulton L , Fulton R , Garcia AC , Gardiner A , Garfield DA , Garvin BE , Gibson G , Gilbert D , Gnerre S , Godfrey J , Good R , Gotea V , Gravely B , Greenberg AJ , Griffiths-Jones S , Gross S , Guigo R , Gustafson EA , Haerty W , Hahn MW , Halligan DL , Halpern AL , Halter GM , Han MV , Heger A , Hillier L , Hinrichs AS , Holmes I , Hoskins RA , Hubisz MJ , Hultmark D , Huntley MA , Jaffe DB , Jagadeeshan S , Jeck WR , Johnson J , Jones CD , Jordan WC , Karpen GH , Kataoka E , Keightley PD , Kheradpour P , Kirkness EF , Koerich LB , Kristiansen K , Kudrna D , Kulathinal RJ , Kumar S , Kwok R , Lander E , Langley CH , Lapoint R , Lazzaro BP , Lee SJ , Levesque L , Li R , Lin CF , Lin MF , Lindblad-Toh K , Llopart A , Long M , Low L , Lozovsky E , Lu J , Luo M , Machado CA , Makalowski W , Marzo M , Matsuda M , Matzkin L , McAllister B , McBride CS , McKernan B , McKernan K , Mendez-Lago M , Minx P , Mollenhauer MU , Montooth K , Mount SM , Mu X , Myers E , Negre B , Newfeld S , Nielsen R , Noor MA , O'Grady P , Pachter L , Papaceit M , Parisi MJ , Parisi M , Parts L , Pedersen JS , Pesole G , Phillippy AM , Ponting CP , Pop M , Porcelli D , Powell JR , Prohaska S , Pruitt K , Puig M , Quesneville H , Ram KR , Rand D , Rasmussen MD , Reed LK , Reenan R , Reily A , Remington KA , Rieger TT , Ritchie MG , Robin C , Rogers YH , Rohde C , Rozas J , Rubenfield MJ , Ruiz A , Russo S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez-Gracia A , Saranga DJ , Sato H , Schaeffer SW , Schatz MC , Schlenke T , Schwartz R , Segarra C , Singh RS , Sirot L , Sirota M , Sisneros NB , Smith CD , Smith TF , Spieth J , Stage DE , Stark A , Stephan W , Strausberg RL , Strempel S , Sturgill D , Sutton G , Sutton GG , Tao W , Teichmann S , Tobari YN , Tomimura Y , Tsolas JM , Valente VL , Venter E , Venter JC , Vicario S , Vieira FG , Vilella AJ , Villasante A , Walenz B , Wang J , Wasserman M , Watts T , Wilson D , Wilson RK , Wing RA , Wolfner MF , Wong A , Wong GK , Wu CI , Wu G , Yamamoto D , Yang HP , Yang SP , Yorke JA , Yoshida K , Zdobnov E , Zhang P , Zhang Y , Zimin AV , Baldwin J , Abdouelleil A , Abdulkadir J , Abebe A , Abera B , Abreu J , Acer SC , Aftuck L , Alexander A , An P , Anderson E , Anderson S , Arachi H , Azer M , Bachantsang P , Barry A , Bayul T , Berlin A , Bessette D , Bloom T , Blye J , Boguslavskiy L , Bonnet C , Boukhgalter B , Bourzgui I , Brown A , Cahill P , Channer S , Cheshatsang Y , Chuda L , Citroen M , Collymore A , Cooke P , Costello M , D'Aco K , Daza R , De Haan G , DeGray S , DeMaso C , Dhargay N , Dooley K , Dooley E , Doricent M , Dorje P , Dorjee K , Dupes A , Elong R , Falk J , Farina A , Faro S , Ferguson D , Fisher S , Foley CD , Franke A , Friedrich D , Gadbois L , Gearin G , Gearin CR , Giannoukos G , Goode T , Graham J , Grandbois E , Grewal S , Gyaltsen K , Hafez N , Hagos B , Hall J , Henson C , Hollinger A , Honan T , Huard MD , Hughes L , Hurhula B , Husby ME , Kamat A , Kanga B , Kashin S , Khazanovich D , Kisner P , Lance K , Lara M , Lee W , Lennon N , Letendre F , LeVine R , Lipovsky A , Liu X , Liu J , Liu S , Lokyitsang T , Lokyitsang Y , Lubonja R , Lui A , Macdonald P , Magnisalis V , Maru K , Matthews C , McCusker W , McDonough S , Mehta T , Meldrim J , Meneus L , Mihai O , Mihalev A , Mihova T , Mittelman R , Mlenga V , Montmayeur A , Mulrain L , Navidi A , Naylor J , Negash T , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nicol R , Norbu C , Norbu N , Novod N , O'Neill B , Osman S , Markiewicz E , Oyono OL , Patti C , Phunkhang P , Pierre F , Priest M , Raghuraman S , Rege F , Reyes R , Rise C , Rogov P , Ross K , Ryan E , Settipalli S , Shea T , Sherpa N , Shi L , Shih D , Sparrow T , Spaulding J , Stalker J , Stange-Thomann N , Stavropoulos S , Stone C , Strader C , Tesfaye S , Thomson T , Thoulutsang Y , Thoulutsang D , Topham K , Topping I , Tsamla T , Vassiliev H , Vo A , Wangchuk T , Wangdi T , Weiand M , Wilkinson J , Wilson A , Yadav S , Young G , Yu Q , Zembek L , Zhong D , Zimmer A , Zwirko Z , Alvarez P , Brockman W , Butler J , Chin C , Grabherr M , Kleber M , Mauceli E , MacCallum I
Ref : Nature , 450 :203 , 2007
Abstract : Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.
ESTHER : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedSearch : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedID: 17994087
Gene_locus related to this paper: droan-ACHE , droan-b3lx10 , droan-b3lx75 , droan-b3lxv7 , droan-b3ly87 , droan-b3lyh4 , droan-b3lyh5 , droan-b3lyh7 , droan-b3lyh9 , droan-b3lyi0 , droan-b3lyi2 , droan-b3lyi3 , droan-b3lyi4 , droan-b3lyj8 , droan-b3lyj9 , droan-b3lyx4 , droan-b3lyx5 , droan-b3lyx6 , droan-b3lyx7 , droan-b3lyx9 , droan-b3lz72 , droan-b3m1x3 , droan-b3m2d4 , droan-b3m3d9 , droan-b3m4e3 , droan-b3m5w1 , droan-b3m6i7 , droan-b3m7v2 , droan-b3m9a5 , droan-b3m9f4 , droan-b3m9p3 , droan-b3m254 , droan-b3m259 , droan-b3m260 , droan-b3m262 , droan-b3m524 , droan-b3m635 , droan-b3m845 , droan-b3m846 , droan-b3md01 , droan-b3mdh7 , droan-b3mdm6 , droan-b3mdw8 , droan-b3mee1 , droan-b3mf47 , droan-b3mf48 , droan-b3mg94 , droan-b3mgk2 , droan-b3mgn6 , droan-b3mii3 , droan-b3mjk2 , droan-b3mjk3 , droan-b3mjk4 , droan-b3mjk5 , droan-b3mjl2 , droan-b3mjl4 , droan-b3mjl7 , droan-b3mjl9 , droan-b3mjm8 , droan-b3mjm9 , droan-b3mjs6 , droan-b3mkr0 , droan-b3ml20 , droan-b3mly4 , droan-b3mly5 , droan-b3mly6 , droan-b3mmm8 , droan-b3mnb5 , droan-b3mny9 , droan-b3mtj5 , droan-b3muw4 , droan-b3muw8 , droan-b3n0e7 , droan-b3n2j7 , droan-b3n247 , droan-c5idb2 , droer-ACHE , droer-b3n5c7 , droer-b3n5d0 , droer-b3n5d8 , droer-b3n5d9 , droer-b3n5t7 , droer-b3n5y4 , droer-b3n7d2 , droer-b3n7d3 , droer-b3n7d4 , droer-b3n7k8 , droer-b3n8e4 , droer-b3n8f7 , droer-b3n8f8 , droer-b3n9e1 , droer-b3n319 , droer-b3n547 , droer-b3n549 , droer-b3n558 , droer-b3n560 , droer-b3n577 , droer-b3n612 , droer-b3nar5 , droer-b3nb91 , droer-b3nct9 , droer-b3nd53 , droer-b3ndh9 , droer-b3ndq8 , droer-b3ne66 , droer-b3ne67 , droer-b3ne97 , droer-b3nfk3 , droer-b3nfq9 , droer-b3nim7 , droer-b3nkn2 , droer-b3nm11 , droer-b3nmh4 , droer-b3nmy2 , droer-b3npx2 , droer-b3npx3 , droer-b3nq76 , droer-b3nqg9 , droer-b3nqm8 , droer-b3nr28 , droer-b3nrd3 , droer-b3nst4 , droer-b3nwa7 , droer-b3nyp5.1 , droer-b3nyp5.2 , droer-b3nyp6 , droer-b3nyp7 , droer-b3nyp8 , droer-b3nyp9 , droer-b3nyq3 , droer-b3nz06 , droer-b3nz14 , droer-b3nzj0 , droer-b3p0c0 , droer-b3p0c1 , droer-b3p0c2 , droer-b3p2x6 , droer-b3p2x7 , droer-b3p2x9 , droer-b3p2y1 , droer-b3p2y2 , droer-b3p6d4 , droer-b3p6d5 , droer-b3p6w3 , droer-b3p7b4 , droer-b3p7h9 , droer-b3p152 , droer-b3p486 , droer-b3p487 , droer-b3p488 , droer-b3p489 , droer-EST6 , droer-q670j5 , drogr-ACHE , drogr-b4iwp3 , drogr-b4iww3 , drogr-b4iwy3 , drogr-b4ixf7 , drogr-b4ixh4 , drogr-b4iyz5 , drogr-b4j2s2 , drogr-b4j2u8 , drogr-b4j3u1 , drogr-b4j3v3 , drogr-b4j4g7 , drogr-b4j4x9 , drogr-b4j6e6 , drogr-b4j9c9 , drogr-b4j9y4 , drogr-b4j156 , drogr-b4j384 , drogr-b4j605 , drogr-b4j685 , drogr-b4ja76 , drogr-b4jay5 , drogr-b4jcf0 , drogr-b4jcf1 , drogr-b4jdg6 , drogr-b4jdg7 , drogr-b4jdh6 , drogr-b4jdz1 , drogr-b4jdz2 , drogr-b4jdz4 , drogr-b4je66 , drogr-b4je79 , drogr-b4je82 , drogr-b4je88 , drogr-b4je89 , drogr-b4je90 , drogr-b4je91 , drogr-b4jf76 , drogr-b4jf79 , drogr-b4jf80 , drogr-b4jf81 , drogr-b4jf82 , drogr-b4jf83 , drogr-b4jf84 , drogr-b4jf85 , drogr-b4jf87 , drogr-b4jf91 , drogr-b4jf92 , drogr-b4jg66 , drogr-b4jgh0 , drogr-b4jgh1 , drogr-b4jgr9 , drogr-b4ji67 , drogr-b4jls2 , drogr-b4jnh9 , drogr-b4jpc6 , drogr-b4jpq3 , drogr-b4jpx9 , drogr-b4jql2 , drogr-b4jrh5 , drogr-b4jsb2 , drogr-b4jth3 , drogr-b4jti1 , drogr-b4jul5 , drogr-b4jur4 , drogr-b4jvh3 , drogr-b4jz00 , drogr-b4jz03 , drogr-b4jz04 , drogr-b4jz05 , drogr-b4jzh2 , drogr-b4k0u2 , drogr-b4k2r1 , drogr-b4k234 , drogr-b4k235 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG11626 , drome-GH02439 , dromo-ACHE , dromo-b4k6a7 , dromo-b4k6a8 , dromo-b4k6q8 , dromo-b4k6q9 , dromo-b4k6r1 , dromo-b4k6r3 , dromo-b4k6r4 , dromo-b4k6r5 , dromo-b4k6r6 , dromo-b4k6r7 , dromo-b4k6r8 , dromo-b4k6r9 , dromo-b4k6s0 , dromo-b4k6s1 , dromo-b4k6s2 , dromo-b4k9c7 , dromo-b4k9d3 , dromo-b4k571 , dromo-b4k721 , dromo-b4ka74 , dromo-b4ka89 , dromo-b4kaj4 , dromo-b4kc20 , dromo-b4kcl2 , dromo-b4kcl3 , dromo-b4kd55.1 , dromo-b4kd55.2 , dromo-b4kd56 , dromo-b4kd57 , dromo-b4kde1 , dromo-b4kdg2 , dromo-b4kdh4 , dromo-b4kdh5 , dromo-b4kdh6 , dromo-A0A0Q9XDF2 , dromo-b4kdh8.1 , dromo-b4kdh8.2 , dromo-b4kg04 , dromo-b4kg05 , dromo-b4kg06 , dromo-b4kg16 , dromo-b4kg44 , dromo-b4kg90 , dromo-b4kh20 , dromo-b4kh21 , dromo-b4kht7 , dromo-b4kid3 , dromo-b4kik0 , dromo-b4kjx0 , dromo-b4kki1 , dromo-b4kkp6 , dromo-b4kkp8 , dromo-b4kkq8 , dromo-b4kkr0 , dromo-b4kkr3 , dromo-b4kkr4 , dromo-b4kks0 , dromo-b4kks1 , dromo-b4kks2 , dromo-b4kla1 , dromo-b4klv8 , dromo-b4knt4 , dromo-b4kp08 , dromo-b4kp16 , dromo-b4kqa6 , dromo-b4kqa7 , dromo-b4kqa8 , dromo-b4kqh1 , dromo-b4kst4 , dromo-b4ksy6 , dromo-b4kt84 , dromo-b4ktf5 , dromo-b4ktf6 , dromo-b4kvl3 , dromo-b4kvw2 , dromo-b4kwv4 , dromo-b4kwv5 , dromo-b4kxz6 , dromo-b4ky12 , dromo-b4ky36 , dromo-b4ky44 , dromo-b4kzu7 , dromo-b4l0n8 , dromo-b4l4u5 , dromo-b4l6l9 , dromo-b4l084 , drope-ACHE , drope-b4g3s6 , drope-b4g4p7 , drope-b4g6v4 , drope-b4g8m0 , drope-b4g8n6 , drope-b4g8n7 , drope-b4g9p2 , drope-b4g815 , drope-b4g816 , drope-b4gat7 , drope-b4gav5 , drope-b4gb05 , drope-b4gc08 , drope-b4gcr3 , drope-b4gdk2 , drope-b4gdl9 , drope-b4gdv9 , drope-b4gei8 , drope-b4gei9 , drope-b4gej0 , drope-b4ghz9 , drope-b4gj62 , drope-b4gj64 , drope-b4gj74 , drope-b4gkf4 , drope-b4gkv2 , drope-b4gky9 , drope-b4gl76 , drope-b4glf3 , drope-b4gmt3 , drope-b4gmt7 , drope-b4gmt9 , drope-b4gmu2 , drope-b4gmu3 , drope-b4gmu4 , drope-b4gmu5 , drope-b4gmu6 , drope-b4gmu7 , drope-b4gmv1 , drope-b4gn08 , drope-b4gpa7 , drope-b4gq13 , drope-b4grh7 , drope-b4gsf9 , drope-b4gsw4 , drope-b4gsw5 , drope-b4gsx2 , drope-b4gsx7 , drope-b4gsy6 , drope-b4gsy7 , drope-b4guj8 , drope-b4gw36 , drope-b4gzc2 , drope-b4gzc6 , drope-b4gzc7 , drope-b4h4p9 , drope-b4h5l3 , drope-b4h6a0 , drope-b4h6a8 , drope-b4h6a9 , drope-b4h6b0 , drope-b4h7m7 , drope-b4h462 , drope-b4h601 , drope-b4h602 , drope-b4hay1 , drope-b4hb18 , drope-est5a , drope-est5b , drope-est5c , drops-ACHE , drops-b5dhd2 , drops-b5dk96 , drops-b5dpe3 , drops-b5drp9 , drops-b5dwa7 , drops-b5dwa8 , drops-b5dz85 , drops-b5dz86 , drops-est5a , drops-est5b , drops-q29bq2 , drops-q29dd7 , drops-q29ew0 , drops-q291d5 , drops-q291e8 , drops-q293n1 , drops-q293n4 , drops-q293n5 , drops-q293n6 , drops-q294n6 , drops-q294n7 , drops-q294n9 , drops-q294p4 , drose-b4he97 , drose-b4hfu2 , drose-b4hg54 , drose-b4hga0 , drose-b4hgu9 , drose-b4hgv0 , drose-b4hgv3 , drose-b4hgv4 , drose-b4hhm8 , drose-b4hhs6 , drose-b4hie4 , drose-b4him9 , drose-b4hk63 , drose-b4hkj5 , drose-b4hr07 , drose-b4hr81 , drose-b4hre7 , drose-b4hs13 , drose-b4hsj9 , drose-b4hsk0 , drose-b4hsm8 , drose-b4hvr5 , drose-b4hwr7 , drose-b4hwr8 , drose-b4hwr9 , drose-b4hws6 , drose-b4hws7 , drose-b4hwt0 , drose-b4hwt2 , drose-b4hwu1 , drose-b4hwu2 , drose-b4hxs9 , drose-b4hxu4 , drose-b4hxz1 , drose-b4hyp8 , drose-b4hyp9 , drose-b4hyq0 , drose-b4hyz4 , drose-b4hyz5 , drose-b4i1k8 , drose-b4i2f3 , drose-b4i2w5 , drose-b4i4u3 , drose-b4i4u7 , drose-b4i4u9 , drose-b4i4v0 , drose-b4i4v1 , drose-b4i4v4 , drose-b4i4v5 , drose-b4i4v6 , drose-b4i4v7 , drose-b4i4v8 , drose-b4i4w0 , drose-b4i7s6 , drose-b4i133 , drose-b4i857 , drose-b4iam7 , drose-b4iam9 , drose-b4iaq6 , drose-b4icf6 , drose-b4icf7 , drose-b4id80 , drose-b4ifc5 , drose-b4ihv9 , drose-b4iie9 , drose-b4ilj8 , drose-b4in13 , drose-b4inj9 , drosi-ACHE , drosi-aes04a , drosi-b4nsh8 , drosi-b4q3d7 , drosi-b4q4w5 , drosi-b4q4y7 , drosi-b4q6h6 , drosi-b4q7u2 , drosi-b4q7u3 , drosi-b4q9c6 , drosi-b4q9c7 , drosi-b4q9d3 , drosi-b4q9d4 , drosi-b4q9r0 , drosi-b4q9r1 , drosi-b4q9r3 , drosi-b4q9s2 , drosi-b4q9s3 , drosi-b4q429 , drosi-b4q530 , drosi-b4q734 , drosi-b4q782 , drosi-b4q783 , drosi-b4q942 , drosi-b4qet1 , drosi-b4qfv6 , drosi-b4qge5 , drosi-b4qgh5 , drosi-b4qgs5 , drosi-b4qhf3 , drosi-b4qhf4 , drosi-b4qhi5 , drosi-b4qjr2 , drosi-b4qjr3 , drosi-b4qjv6 , drosi-b4qk23 , drosi-b4qk51 , drosi-b4qlt1 , drosi-b4qlz9 , drosi-b4qmn9 , drosi-b4qrq7 , drosi-b4qs01 , drosi-b4qs57 , drosi-b4qs82 , drosi-b4qs83 , drosi-b4qs84 , drosi-b4qs85 , drosi-b4qs86 , drosi-b4qsq1 , drosi-b4quk6 , drosi-b4qvg5 , drosi-b4qvg6 , drosi-b4qzn2 , drosi-b4qzn3 , drosi-b4qzn5 , drosi-b4qzn7 , drosi-b4qzn8 , drosi-b4qzp2 , drosi-b4qzp3 , drosi-b4qzp4 , drosi-b4qzp5 , drosi-b4qzp6 , drosi-b4qzp7 , drosi-b4r1a4 , drosi-b4r025 , drosi-b4r207 , drosi-b4r662 , drosi-este6 , drosi-q670k8 , drovi-ACHE , drovi-b4lev2 , drovi-b4lf33 , drovi-b4lf51 , drovi-b4lg54 , drovi-b4lg72 , drovi-b4lgc6 , drovi-b4lgd5 , drovi-b4lgg0 , drovi-b4lgk5 , drovi-b4lgn2 , drovi-b4lh17 , drovi-b4lh18 , drovi-b4lk43 , drovi-b4ll59 , drovi-b4ll60 , drovi-b4llm5 , drovi-b4lln3 , drovi-b4lmk4 , drovi-b4lmp0 , drovi-b4lnr4 , drovi-b4lp47 , drovi-b4lpd0 , drovi-b4lps0 , drovi-b4lqc6 , drovi-b4lr00 , drovi-b4lrp6 , drovi-b4lrw2 , drovi-b4lse7 , drovi-b4lse9 , drovi-b4lsf0 , drovi-b4lsn0 , drovi-b4lsq5 , drovi-b4lt32 , drovi-b4ltr1 , drovi-b4lui7 , drovi-b4lui9 , drovi-b4luj8 , drovi-b4luk0 , drovi-b4luk3 , drovi-b4luk8 , drovi-b4luk9 , drovi-b4lul0 , drovi-b4lve2 , drovi-b4lxi9 , drovi-b4lxj8 , drovi-b4lyf3 , drovi-b4lyq2 , drovi-b4lyq3 , drovi-b4lz07 , drovi-b4lz13 , drovi-b4lz14 , drovi-b4lz15 , drovi-b4m0j7 , drovi-b4m0s0 , drovi-b4m2b6 , drovi-b4m4h7 , drovi-b4m4h8 , drovi-b4m4i0 , drovi-b4m4i2 , drovi-b4m4i3.A , drovi-b4m4i3.B , drovi-b4m4i4 , drovi-b4m4i5 , drovi-b4m4i6 , drovi-b4m4i7 , drovi-b4m4i8 , drovi-b4m4i9 , drovi-b4m4j2 , drovi-b4m5a0 , drovi-b4m5a1 , drovi-b4m5a2 , drovi-b4m6b9 , drovi-b4m7k9 , drovi-b4m9g9 , drovi-b4m9h0 , drovi-b4m564 , drovi-b4m599 , drovi-b4m918 , drovi-b4mb87 , drovi-b4mc71 , drovi-b4mfa4 , drowi-ACHE , drowi-b4mjb9 , drowi-b4mkt7 , drowi-b4mlc1 , drowi-b4mp68 , drowi-b4mqe9 , drowi-b4mqf0.2 , drowi-b4mqf1 , drowi-b4mqf3 , drowi-b4mqf4 , drowi-b4mqf5 , drowi-b4mqq6 , drowi-b4mrd1 , drowi-b4mrk3 , drowi-b4mtl5 , drowi-b4mug2 , drowi-b4muj8 , drowi-b4mv18 , drowi-b4mw32 , drowi-b4mw85 , drowi-b4mwp2 , drowi-b4mwp6 , drowi-b4mwq5 , drowi-b4mwr0 , drowi-b4mwr8 , drowi-b4mwr9 , drowi-b4mwt1 , drowi-b4mwz7 , drowi-b4mxn5 , drowi-b4my54 , drowi-b4myg1 , drowi-b4myh5 , drowi-b4n0d4 , drowi-b4n1a7 , drowi-b4n1c8 , drowi-b4n3s9 , drowi-b4n3x7 , drowi-b4n4x9 , drowi-b4n4y0 , drowi-b4n6m1 , drowi-b4n6n0 , drowi-b4n6n7 , drowi-b4n6u6 , drowi-b4n7s6 , drowi-b4n7s7 , drowi-b4n7s8 , drowi-b4n899.1 , drowi-b4n8a1 , drowi-b4n8a2 , drowi-b4n8a3 , drowi-b4n8a4 , drowi-b4n8a9 , drowi-b4n023 , drowi-b4n075 , drowi-b4n543 , drowi-b4n888 , drowi-b4n889 , drowi-b4n891 , drowi-b4n893 , drowi-b4n895 , drowi-b4n897 , drowi-b4n898 , drowi-b4n899.2 , drowi-b4nae3 , drowi-b4ner8 , drowi-b4ng76 , drowi-b4nga7 , drowi-b4ngb5 , drowi-b4nhz9 , drowi-b4nj18 , drowi-b4nj19 , drowi-b4nja7 , drowi-b4nja8 , drowi-b4nja9 , drowi-b4njk8 , drowi-b4nkc8 , drowi-b4nky0 , drowi-b4nl36 , drowi-b4nm27 , drowi-b4nn59 , drowi-b4nnc1 , drowi-b4nng1 , drowi-b4nng2 , droya-ACHE , droya-aes04 , droya-b4itg2 , droya-b4itg6 , droya-b4itu9 , droya-b4iuv4 , droya-b4iuv5 , droya-b4nxe6 , droya-b4nxg5 , droya-b4nxg6 , droya-b4nxg8 , droya-b4nxw4 , droya-b4ny57 , droya-b4ny58 , droya-b4ny86 , droya-b4nzz8 , droya-b4p0b5 , droya-b4p0q9 , droya-b4p0r0 , droya-b4p0r7 , droya-b4p0r8 , droya-b4p0r9 , droya-b4p0s0 , droya-b4p0s2 , droya-b4p0t0 , droya-b4p0t1 , droya-b4p3h4 , droya-b4p3x8 , droya-b4p5g8 , droya-b4p6c9 , droya-b4p6l9 , droya-b4p6r1 , droya-b4p6r2 , droya-b4p7u4 , droya-b4p8w7 , droya-b4p023 , droya-b4p241 , droya-b4p774 , droya-b4pat9 , droya-b4pbl1 , droya-b4pd22 , droya-b4pd70 , droya-b4pdm8 , droya-b4pet9 , droya-b4pff9 , droya-b4pga7 , droya-b4pgu0 , droya-b4pig3 , droya-b4pjt8 , droya-b4pka2 , droya-b4plh2 , droya-b4pma3 , droya-b4pmv3 , droya-b4pmv4 , droya-b4pmv5 , droya-b4pn92 , droya-b4pp65 , droya-b4ppc5 , droya-b4ppc6 , droya-b4ppc7 , droya-b4ppc8 , droya-b4pq03 , droya-b4prg6B , droya-b4prg9 , droya-b4prh3 , droya-b4prh4 , droya-b4prh6 , droya-b4prh7 , droya-b4psz8 , droya-b4psz9 , droya-b4pv22 , droya-b4q0g5 , droya-b4q246 , droya-EST6 , droya-q71d76 , drowi-b4n7m9 , drope-b4gkk1 , droer-b3n5s3 , drose-b4i1w5 , drowi-a0a0q9x0t3 , drogr-b4jvm7 , dromo-b4ku70 , drovi-b4mcn9 , drovi-b4lty2 , drogr-b4jdu1 , drovi-a0a0q9wiq8 , dromo-b4kf70 , drosi-b2zi86 , droya-b4p2y4 , drose-b2zic5 , droer-b3n895

Title : Sequence, annotation, and analysis of synteny between rice chromosome 3 and diverged grass species - Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
Author(s) : Buell CR , Yuan Q , Ouyang S , Liu J , Zhu W , Wang A , Maiti R , Haas B , Wortman J , Pertea M , Jones KM , Kim M , Overton L , Tsitrin T , Fadrosh D , Bera J , Weaver B , Jin S , Johri S , Reardon M , Webb K , Hill J , Moffat K , Tallon L , Van Aken S , Lewis M , Utterback T , Feldblyum T , Zismann V , Iobst S , Hsiao J , de Vazeille AR , Salzberg SL , White O , Fraser C , Yu Y , Kim H , Rambo T , Currie J , Collura K , Kernodle-Thompson S , Wei F , Kudrna K , Ammiraju JS , Luo M , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Henry D , Oates R , Palmer M , Pries G , Saski C , Simmons J , Soderlund C , Nelson W , de la Bastide M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Huang E , Preston R , Zutavern T , Palmer LE , O'Shaughnessy A , Dike S , McCombie WR , Minx P , Cordum H , Wilson R , Jin W , Lee HR , Jiang J , Jackson S
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1284 , 2005
Abstract : Rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 3 is evolutionarily conserved across the cultivated cereals and shares large blocks of synteny with maize and sorghum, which diverged from rice more than 50 million years ago. To begin to completely understand this chromosome, we sequenced, finished, and annotated 36.1 Mb ( approximately 97%) from O. sativa subsp. japonica cv Nipponbare. Annotation features of the chromosome include 5915 genes, of which 913 are related to transposable elements. A putative function could be assigned to 3064 genes, with another 757 genes annotated as expressed, leaving 2094 that encode hypothetical proteins. Similarity searches against the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed putative homologs for 67% of the chromosome 3 proteins. Further searches of a nonredundant amino acid database, the Pfam domain database, plant Expressed Sequence Tags, and genomic assemblies from sorghum and maize revealed only 853 nontransposable element related proteins from chromosome 3 that lacked similarity to other known sequences. Interestingly, 426 of these have a paralog within the rice genome. A comparative physical map of the wild progenitor species, Oryza nivara, with japonica chromosome 3 revealed a high degree of sequence identity and synteny between these two species, which diverged approximately 10,000 years ago. Although no major rearrangements were detected, the deduced size of the O. nivara chromosome 3 was 21% smaller than that of japonica. Synteny between rice and other cereals using an integrated maize physical map and wheat genetic map was strikingly high, further supporting the use of rice and, in particular, chromosome 3, as a model for comparative studies among the cereals.
ESTHER : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedSearch : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedID: 16109971
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q852M6 , orysa-Q8S5X5 , orysa-Q84QZ6 , orysa-Q84QY7 , orysa-Q851E3 , orysa-q6ave2 , orysj-cgep , orysj-q0dud7 , orysj-q10j20 , orysj-q10ss2