Maiti R

References (6)

Title : Comparative genomic analyses of the human fungal pathogens Coccidioides and their relatives - Sharpton_2009_Genome.Res_19_1722
Author(s) : Sharpton TJ , Stajich JE , Rounsley SD , Gardner MJ , Wortman JR , Jordar VS , Maiti R , Kodira CD , Neafsey DE , Zeng Q , Hung CY , McMahan C , Muszewska A , Grynberg M , Mandel MA , Kellner EM , Barker BM , Galgiani JN , Orbach MJ , Kirkland TN , Cole GT , Henn MR , Birren BW , Taylor JW
Ref : Genome Res , 19 :1722 , 2009
Abstract : While most Ascomycetes tend to associate principally with plants, the dimorphic fungi Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are primary pathogens of immunocompetent mammals, including humans. Infection results from environmental exposure to Coccidiodies, which is believed to grow as a soil saprophyte in arid deserts. To investigate hypotheses about the life history and evolution of Coccidioides, the genomes of several Onygenales, including C. immitis and C. posadasii; a close, nonpathogenic relative, Uncinocarpus reesii; and a more diverged pathogenic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, were sequenced and compared with those of 13 more distantly related Ascomycetes. This analysis identified increases and decreases in gene family size associated with a host/substrate shift from plants to animals in the Onygenales. In addition, comparison among Onygenales genomes revealed evolutionary changes in Coccidioides that may underlie its infectious phenotype, the identification of which may facilitate improved treatment and prevention of coccidioidomycosis. Overall, the results suggest that Coccidioides species are not soil saprophytes, but that they have evolved to remain associated with their dead animal hosts in soil, and that Coccidioides metabolism genes, membrane-related proteins, and putatively antigenic compounds have evolved in response to interaction with an animal host.
ESTHER : Sharpton_2009_Genome.Res_19_1722
PubMedSearch : Sharpton_2009_Genome.Res_19_1722
PubMedID: 19717792
Gene_locus related to this paper: ajecg-c0nbn5 , ajecg-c0nbz4 , ajecg-c0ndw0 , ajecg-c0nqc6 , ajecg-c0nst6 , ajecg-c0ntx5 , ajecg-c0nu33 , ajecg-c0nzh6 , ajecg-c0p0h0 , ajech-c6h1y9 , ajecn-a6qs62 , ajecn-a6quy7 , ajecn-a6r2c0 , ajecn-a6r491 , ajecn-a6r635 , ajecn-a6rab7 , ajecn-a6ram0 , ajecn-a6rf08 , ajecn-a6rf70 , ajecn-atg15 , ajecn-dapb , ajeds-c5jqx1 , cocim-atg15 , cocim-bst1 , cocim-j3k8a1 , cocp7-c5p0f2 , cocp7-c5p0i6 , cocp7-c5p1s3 , cocp7-c5p1u2 , cocp7-c5p2u8 , cocp7-c5p4s8 , cocp7-c5p4z1 , cocp7-c5p5s7 , cocp7-c5p129 , cocp7-c5p172 , cocp7-c5p250 , cocps-e9ctz7 , cocp7-c5pae0 , cocp7-c5pby4 , cocp7-c5pdn8 , cocp7-c5pdv9 , cocp7-c5pe69 , cocp7-c5pf68 , cocp7-c5pgk6 , cocp7-c5pid0 , cocp7-dapb , cocps-e9cz73 , cocps-e9dbi4 , cocps-e9dbu0 , cocps-e9dfh7 , uncre-c4jf72 , uncre-c4jf79 , uncre-c4ji27 , uncre-c4jj62 , uncre-c4jjs9 , uncre-c4jk71 , uncre-c4jlm9 , uncre-c4jlp5 , uncre-c4jlr7 , uncre-c4jnk2 , uncre-c4jnn3 , uncre-c4juj6 , uncre-c4jve9 , uncre-c4jvh5 , uncre-c4jw09 , uncre-c4jyw9 , uncre-c4jzs5 , uncre-dapb , ajech-c6h9r4 , uncre-c4jds5 , cocp7-c5pii3 , ajecn-a6r5v8 , cocim-j3ka92 , cocp7-c5phc6 , ajecn-a6qtc4 , ajecn-a6r145 , cocps-e9d3i4 , cocp7-c5p7x1 , cocps-e9csw0 , ajecg-c0nww6 , ajecn-kex1 , uncre-kex1 , uncre-cbpya , cocps-kex1 , ajecn-cbpya

Title : Genomic islands in the pathogenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
Author(s) : Fedorova ND , Khaldi N , Joardar VS , Maiti R , Amedeo P , Anderson MJ , Crabtree J , Silva JC , Badger JH , Albarraq A , Angiuoli S , Bussey H , Bowyer P , Cotty PJ , Dyer PS , Egan A , Galens K , Fraser-Liggett CM , Haas BJ , Inman JM , Kent R , Lemieux S , Malavazi I , Orvis J , Roemer T , Ronning CM , Sundaram JP , Sutton G , Turner G , Venter JC , White OR , Whitty BR , Youngman P , Wolfe KH , Goldman GH , Wortman JR , Jiang B , Denning DW , Nierman WC
Ref : PLoS Genet , 4 :e1000046 , 2008
Abstract : We present the genome sequences of a new clinical isolate of the important human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, A1163, and two closely related but rarely pathogenic species, Neosartorya fischeri NRRL181 and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1. Comparative genomic analysis of A1163 with the recently sequenced A. fumigatus isolate Af293 has identified core, variable and up to 2% unique genes in each genome. While the core genes are 99.8% identical at the nucleotide level, identity for variable genes can be as low 40%. The most divergent loci appear to contain heterokaryon incompatibility (het) genes associated with fungal programmed cell death such as developmental regulator rosA. Cross-species comparison has revealed that 8.5%, 13.5% and 12.6%, respectively, of A. fumigatus, N. fischeri and A. clavatus genes are species-specific. These genes are significantly smaller in size than core genes, contain fewer exons and exhibit a subtelomeric bias. Most of them cluster together in 13 chromosomal islands, which are enriched for pseudogenes, transposons and other repetitive elements. At least 20% of A. fumigatus-specific genes appear to be functional and involved in carbohydrate and chitin catabolism, transport, detoxification, secondary metabolism and other functions that may facilitate the adaptation to heterogeneous environments such as soil or a mammalian host. Contrary to what was suggested previously, their origin cannot be attributed to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), but instead is likely to involve duplication, diversification and differential gene loss (DDL). The role of duplication in the origin of lineage-specific genes is further underlined by the discovery of genomic islands that seem to function as designated "gene dumps" and, perhaps, simultaneously, as "gene factories".
ESTHER : Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
PubMedSearch : Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
PubMedID: 18404212
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspcl-a1c4m6 , aspcl-a1c5a7 , aspcl-a1c6w3 , aspcl-a1c8p7 , aspcl-a1c8q9 , aspcl-a1c9k4 , aspcl-a1c759 , aspcl-a1c786 , aspcl-a1c823 , aspcl-a1c859 , aspcl-a1c881 , aspcl-a1c994 , aspcl-a1cag4 , aspcl-a1caj8 , aspcl-a1cas0 , aspcl-a1cc86 , aspcl-a1ccq2 , aspcl-a1cfv7 , aspcl-a1chj6 , aspcl-a1cif4 , aspcl-a1ck14 , aspcl-a1cke4 , aspcl-a1ckq1 , aspcl-a1cli1 , aspcl-a1cln8 , aspcl-a1cm72 , aspcl-a1cns2 , aspcl-a1cpk9 , aspcl-a1cra8 , aspcl-a1crr5 , aspcl-a1crs9 , aspcl-a1cs04 , aspcl-a1cs39 , aspcl-a1cu39 , aspcl-atg15 , aspcl-axe1 , aspcl-cuti1 , aspcl-cuti3 , aspcl-dapb , aspcl-dpp4 , aspcl-dpp5 , aspcl-faeb , aspcl-faec1 , aspcl-faec2 , aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-b0y2h6 , aspfc-b0y962 , aspfc-b0yaj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-DPP4 , aspfu-faeb1 , aspfu-faec , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4w9r3 , aspfu-q4w9t5 , aspfu-q4w9z4 , aspfu-q4wa57 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wag0 , aspfu-q4wal3 , aspfu-q4wbc5 , aspfu-q4wbj7 , aspfu-q4wdg2 , aspfu-q4wf06 , aspfu-q4wf29 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wfq9 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wgm4 , aspfu-q4win2 , aspfu-q4wk31 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wk90 , aspfu-q4wm12 , aspfu-q4wm84 , aspfu-q4wm86 , aspfu-q4wmr0 , aspfu-q4wny7 , aspfu-q4wp19 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqj8 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wrr7 , aspfu-q4wu51 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wui7 , aspfu-q4wuk8 , aspfu-q4wum3 , aspfu-q4wuw0 , aspfu-q4wvy1 , aspfu-q4ww22 , aspfu-q4wx13 , aspfu-q4wxd0 , aspfu-q4wxe4 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4wyq5 , aspfu-q4wz16 , aspfu-q4wzd5 , aspfu-q4wzh6 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q4x1w9 , aspfu-q4x078 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1d4m8 , neofi-a1d4p0 , neofi-a1d5p2 , neofi-a1d104 , neofi-a1d380 , neofi-a1d512 , neofi-a1d654 , neofi-a1da18 , neofi-a1dal8 , neofi-a1df46 , neofi-a1dhj0 , neofi-a1di44 , neofi-a1dk35 , neofi-a1dki7 , neofi-a1dkt6 , neofi-a1dn55 , neofi-atg15 , neofi-axe1 , neofi-faeb1 , neofi-faeb2 , neofi-faec , aspcl-a1cd34 , aspcl-a1cd88 , neofi-a1dc66 , aspcl-a1ceh5 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspcl-a1cqb5 , aspcl-a1cs44 , neofi-a1d517 , neofi-a1dbz0 , neofi-a1cuz0 , aspcl-a1c5e8 , neofi-a1d0b8 , aspcl-a1cdf0 , aspcl-a1ccd3 , neofi-a1da82 , neofi-a1d5e6 , aspcl-kex1 , aspcl-cbpya

Title : The genome of the basidiomycetous yeast and human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans - Loftus_2005_Science_307_1321
Author(s) : Loftus BJ , Fung E , Roncaglia P , Rowley D , Amedeo P , Bruno D , Vamathevan J , Miranda M , Anderson IJ , Fraser JA , Allen JE , Bosdet IE , Brent MR , Chiu R , Doering TL , Donlin MJ , D'Souza CA , Fox DS , Grinberg V , Fu J , Fukushima M , Haas BJ , Huang JC , Janbon G , Jones SJ , Koo HL , Krzywinski MI , Kwon-Chung JK , Lengeler KB , Maiti R , Marra MA , Marra RE , Mathewson CA , Mitchell TG , Pertea M , Riggs FR , Salzberg SL , Schein JE , Shvartsbeyn A , Shin H , Shumway M , Specht CA , Suh BB , Tenney A , Utterback TR , Wickes BL , Wortman JR , Wye NH , Kronstad JW , Lodge JK , Heitman J , Davis RW , Fraser CM , Hyman RW
Ref : Science , 307 :1321 , 2005
Abstract : Cryptococcus neoformans is a basidiomycetous yeast ubiquitous in the environment, a model for fungal pathogenesis, and an opportunistic human pathogen of global importance. We have sequenced its approximately 20-megabase genome, which contains approximately 6500 intron-rich gene structures and encodes a transcriptome abundant in alternatively spliced and antisense messages. The genome is rich in transposons, many of which cluster at candidate centromeric regions. The presence of these transposons may drive karyotype instability and phenotypic variation. C. neoformans encodes unique genes that may contribute to its unusual virulence properties, and comparison of two phenotypically distinct strains reveals variation in gene content in addition to sequence polymorphisms between the genomes.
ESTHER : Loftus_2005_Science_307_1321
PubMedSearch : Loftus_2005_Science_307_1321
PubMedID: 15653466
Gene_locus related to this paper: cryne-apth1 , cryne-ppme1 , cryne-q5k7g1 , cryne-q5k7h2 , cryne-q5k7p6 , cryne-q5k8p2 , cryne-q5k8s0 , cryne-q5k9e7 , cryne-q5k9p3 , cryne-q5k9y9 , cryne-q5k721 , cryne-q5k987 , cryne-q5ka03 , cryne-q5ka24 , cryne-q5ka58 , cryne-q5kat4 , cryne-q5kav3 , cryne-q5kbu4 , cryne-q5kbw4 , cryne-q5kc00 , cryne-q5kec5 , cryne-q5kei3 , cryne-q5kei7 , cryne-q5ker2 , cryne-q5key5 , cryne-q5kf48 , cryne-q5kfk6 , cryne-q5kfz0 , cryne-q5kgq3 , cryne-q5kh37 , cryne-q5khb0 , cryne-q5khb9 , cryne-q5kip7 , cryne-q5kiu5 , cryne-q5kj56 , cryne-q5kjf8 , cryne-q5kjh3 , cryne-q5kjp9 , cryne-q5kjw7 , cryne-q5kky1 , cryne-q5kkz7 , cryne-q5kl13 , cryne-q5klu9 , cryne-q5km63 , cryne-q5kme9 , cryne-q5kni1 , cryne-q5knq0 , cryne-q5knr2 , cryne-q5knw0 , cryne-q5kq08 , cryne-Q5KCH9 , cryne-q55ta1 , cryne-q5kjh4 , crynj-q5knp8 , crynj-q5kpe0

Title : Sequence, annotation, and analysis of synteny between rice chromosome 3 and diverged grass species - Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
Author(s) : Buell CR , Yuan Q , Ouyang S , Liu J , Zhu W , Wang A , Maiti R , Haas B , Wortman J , Pertea M , Jones KM , Kim M , Overton L , Tsitrin T , Fadrosh D , Bera J , Weaver B , Jin S , Johri S , Reardon M , Webb K , Hill J , Moffat K , Tallon L , Van Aken S , Lewis M , Utterback T , Feldblyum T , Zismann V , Iobst S , Hsiao J , de Vazeille AR , Salzberg SL , White O , Fraser C , Yu Y , Kim H , Rambo T , Currie J , Collura K , Kernodle-Thompson S , Wei F , Kudrna K , Ammiraju JS , Luo M , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Henry D , Oates R , Palmer M , Pries G , Saski C , Simmons J , Soderlund C , Nelson W , de la Bastide M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Huang E , Preston R , Zutavern T , Palmer LE , O'Shaughnessy A , Dike S , McCombie WR , Minx P , Cordum H , Wilson R , Jin W , Lee HR , Jiang J , Jackson S
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1284 , 2005
Abstract : Rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 3 is evolutionarily conserved across the cultivated cereals and shares large blocks of synteny with maize and sorghum, which diverged from rice more than 50 million years ago. To begin to completely understand this chromosome, we sequenced, finished, and annotated 36.1 Mb ( approximately 97%) from O. sativa subsp. japonica cv Nipponbare. Annotation features of the chromosome include 5915 genes, of which 913 are related to transposable elements. A putative function could be assigned to 3064 genes, with another 757 genes annotated as expressed, leaving 2094 that encode hypothetical proteins. Similarity searches against the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed putative homologs for 67% of the chromosome 3 proteins. Further searches of a nonredundant amino acid database, the Pfam domain database, plant Expressed Sequence Tags, and genomic assemblies from sorghum and maize revealed only 853 nontransposable element related proteins from chromosome 3 that lacked similarity to other known sequences. Interestingly, 426 of these have a paralog within the rice genome. A comparative physical map of the wild progenitor species, Oryza nivara, with japonica chromosome 3 revealed a high degree of sequence identity and synteny between these two species, which diverged approximately 10,000 years ago. Although no major rearrangements were detected, the deduced size of the O. nivara chromosome 3 was 21% smaller than that of japonica. Synteny between rice and other cereals using an integrated maize physical map and wheat genetic map was strikingly high, further supporting the use of rice and, in particular, chromosome 3, as a model for comparative studies among the cereals.
ESTHER : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedSearch : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedID: 16109971
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q852M6 , orysa-Q8S5X5 , orysa-Q84QZ6 , orysa-Q84QY7 , orysa-Q851E3 , orysa-q6ave2 , orysj-cgep , orysj-q0dud7 , orysj-q10j20 , orysj-q10ss2

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 3 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
Author(s) : Salanoubat M , Lemcke K , Rieger M , Ansorge W , Unseld M , Fartmann B , Valle G , Blocker H , Perez-Alonso M , Obermaier B , Delseny M , Boutry M , Grivell LA , Mache R , Puigdomenech P , de Simone V , Choisne N , Artiguenave F , Robert C , Brottier P , Wincker P , Cattolico L , Weissenbach J , Saurin W , Quetier F , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Benes V , Wurmbach E , Drzonek H , Erfle H , Jordan N , Bangert S , Wiedelmann R , Kranz H , Voss H , Holland R , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Vezzi A , D'Angelo M , Pallavicini A , Toppo S , Simionati B , Conrad A , Hornischer K , Kauer G , Lohnert TH , Nordsiek G , Reichelt J , Scharfe M , Schon O , Bargues M , Terol J , Climent J , Navarro P , Collado C , Perez-Perez A , Ottenwalder B , Duchemin D , Cooke R , Laudie M , Berger-Llauro C , Purnelle B , Masuy D , de Haan M , Maarse AC , Alcaraz JP , Cottet A , Casacuberta E , Monfort A , Argiriou A , Flores M , Liguori R , Vitale D , Mannhaupt G , Haase D , Schoof H , Rudd S , Zaccaria P , Mewes HW , Mayer KF , Kaul S , Town CD , Koo HL , Tallon LJ , Jenkins J , Rooney T , Rizzo M , Walts A , Utterback T , Fujii CY , Shea TP , Creasy TH , Haas B , Maiti R , Wu D , Peterson J , Van Aken S , Pai G , Militscher J , Sellers P , Gill JE , Feldblyum TV , Preuss D , Lin X , Nierman WC , Salzberg SL , White O , Venter JC , Fraser CM , Kaneko T , Nakamura Y , Sato S , Kato T , Asamizu E , Sasamoto S , Kimura T , Idesawa K , Kawashima K , Kishida Y , Kiyokawa C , Kohara M , Matsumoto M , Matsuno A , Muraki A , Nakayama S , Nakazaki N , Shinpo S , Takeuchi C , Wada T , Watanabe A , Yamada M , Yasuda M , Tabata S
Ref : Nature , 408 :820 , 2000
Abstract : Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for plant biologists. In 1996 an international collaboration (the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative) was formed to sequence the whole genome of Arabidopsis and in 1999 the sequence of the first two chromosomes was reported. The sequence of the last three chromosomes and an analysis of the whole genome are reported in this issue. Here we present the sequence of chromosome 3, organized into four sequence segments (contigs). The two largest (13.5 and 9.2 Mb) correspond to the top (long) and the bottom (short) arms of chromosome 3, and the two small contigs are located in the genetically defined centromere. This chromosome encodes 5,220 of the roughly 25,500 predicted protein-coding genes in the genome. About 20% of the predicted proteins have significant homology to proteins in eukaryotic genomes for which the complete sequence is available, pointing to important conserved cellular functions among eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedSearch : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedID: 11130713
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-MES17 , arath-AT3G12150 , arath-At3g61680 , arath-AT3g62590 , arath-CXE12 , arath-eds1 , arath-SCP25 , arath-F1P2.110 , arath-F1P2.140 , arath-F11F8.28 , arath-F14D17.80 , arath-F16B3.4 , arath-SCP27 , arath-At3g50790 , arath-At3g05600 , arath-PAD4 , arath-At3g51000 , arath-SCP16 , arath-gid1 , arath-GID1B , arath-Q9LUG8 , arath-Q84JS1 , arath-Q9SFF6 , arath-q9m236 , arath-q9sr22 , arath-q9sr23 , arath-SCP7 , arath-SCP14 , arath-SCP15 , arath-SCP17 , arath-SCP36 , arath-SCP37 , arath-SCP39 , arath-SCP40 , arath-SCP49 , arath-T19F11.2

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 1 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
Author(s) : Theologis A , Ecker JR , Palm CJ , Federspiel NA , Kaul S , White O , Alonso J , Altafi H , Araujo R , Bowman CL , Brooks SY , Buehler E , Chan A , Chao Q , Chen H , Cheuk RF , Chin CW , Chung MK , Conn L , Conway AB , Conway AR , Creasy TH , Dewar K , Dunn P , Etgu P , Feldblyum TV , Feng J , Fong B , Fujii CY , Gill JE , Goldsmith AD , Haas B , Hansen NF , Hughes B , Huizar L , Hunter JL , Jenkins J , Johnson-Hopson C , Khan S , Khaykin E , Kim CJ , Koo HL , Kremenetskaia I , Kurtz DB , Kwan A , Lam B , Langin-Hooper S , Lee A , Lee JM , Lenz CA , Li JH , Li Y , Lin X , Liu SX , Liu ZA , Luros JS , Maiti R , Marziali A , Militscher J , Miranda M , Nguyen M , Nierman WC , Osborne BI , Pai G , Peterson J , Pham PK , Rizzo M , Rooney T , Rowley D , Sakano H , Salzberg SL , Schwartz JR , Shinn P , Southwick AM , Sun H , Tallon LJ , Tambunga G , Toriumi MJ , Town CD , Utterback T , Van Aken S , Vaysberg M , Vysotskaia VS , Walker M , Wu D , Yu G , Fraser CM , Venter JC , Davis RW
Ref : Nature , 408 :816 , 2000
Abstract : The genome of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana has five chromosomes. Here we report the sequence of the largest, chromosome 1, in two contigs of around 14.2 and 14.6 megabases. The contigs extend from the telomeres to the centromeric borders, regions rich in transposons, retrotransposons and repetitive elements such as the 180-base-pair repeat. The chromosome represents 25% of the genome and contains about 6,850 open reading frames, 236 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and 12 small nuclear RNAs. There are two clusters of tRNA genes at different places on the chromosome. One consists of 27 tRNA(Pro) genes and the other contains 27 tandem repeats of tRNA(Tyr)-tRNA(Tyr)-tRNA(Ser) genes. Chromosome 1 contains about 300 gene families with clustered duplications. There are also many repeat elements, representing 8% of the sequence.
ESTHER : Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
PubMedSearch : Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
PubMedID: 11130712
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At1g05790 , arath-At1g09280 , arath-At1g09980 , arath-AT1G29120 , arath-AT1G52695 , arath-AT1G66900 , arath-At1g73750 , arath-AT1G73920 , arath-AT1G74640 , arath-AT1G76140 , arath-AT1G78210 , arath-clh1 , arath-F1O17.3 , arath-F1O17.4 , arath-F1O17.5 , arath-F5I6.3 , arath-At1g52700 , arath-F6D8.27 , arath-F6D8.32 , arath-F9L1.44 , arath-F9P14.11 , arath-F12A4.4 , arath-MES11 , arath-F14G24.2 , arath-F14G24.3 , arath-F14I3.4 , arath-F14O10.2 , arath-F16N3.25 , arath-LCAT2 , arath-At1g34340 , arath-MES15 , arath-CXE6 , arath-ICML1 , arath-At1g72620 , arath-LCAT1 , arath-PLA12 , arath-PLA15 , arath-PLA17 , arath-Q8L7S1 , arath-At1g15070 , arath-SCP2 , arath-SCP4 , arath-SCP5 , arath-SCP18 , arath-SCP32 , arath-SCP44 , arath-SCP45 , arath-SCPL6 , arath-F4IE65 , arath-At1g30370 , arath-T6L1.8 , arath-T6L1.20 , arath-T14P4.6 , arath-MES14 , arath-SCP3 , arath-AXR4 , arath-At1g10040 , arath-ZW18 , arath-pae2 , arath-pae1 , arath-a0a1p8awg3