Yoshida K

References (28)

Title : Enhancement of protein thermostability by three consecutive mutations using loop-walking method and machine learning - Yoshida_2021_Sci.Rep_11_11883
Author(s) : Yoshida K , Kawai S , Fujitani M , Koikeda S , Kato R , Ema T
Ref : Sci Rep , 11 :11883 , 2021
Abstract : We developed a method to improve protein thermostability, "loop-walking method". Three consecutive positions in 12 loops of Burkholderia cepacia lipase were subjected to random mutagenesis to make 12 libraries. Screening allowed us to identify L7 as a hot-spot loop having an impact on thermostability, and the P233G/L234E/V235M mutant was found from 214 variants in the L7 library. Although a more excellent mutant might be discovered by screening all the 8000 P233X/L234X/V235X mutants, it was difficult to assay all of them. We therefore employed machine learning. Using thermostability data of the 214 mutants, a computational discrimination model was constructed to predict thermostability potentials. Among 7786 combinations ranked in silico, 20 promising candidates were selected and assayed. The P233D/L234P/V235S mutant retained 66% activity after heat treatment at 60 degreesC for 30 min, which was higher than those of the wild-type enzyme (5%) and the P233G/L234E/V235M mutant (35%).
ESTHER : Yoshida_2021_Sci.Rep_11_11883
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_2021_Sci.Rep_11_11883
PubMedID: 34088952
Gene_locus related to this paper: burce-lipaa

Title : Bacterial triacylglycerol lipase is a potential cholesterol esterase: Identification of a key determinant for sterol-binding specificity - Yasutake_2021_Int.J.Biol.Macromol_167_578
Author(s) : Yasutake Y , Konishi K , Muramatsu S , Yoshida K , Aburatani S , Sakasegawa SI , Tamura T
Ref : Int J Biol Macromol , 167 :578 , 2021
Abstract : Cholesterol esterase (Che) from Burkholderia stabilis (BsChe) is a homolog of well-characterized and industrially relevant bacterial triacylglycerol lipases (Lips). BsChe is a rare bacterial Lip enzyme that exhibits practical Che activity and is currently used in clinical applications to determine total serum cholesterol levels. To investigate the sterol specificity of BsChe, we determined the X-ray structure of BsChe. We discovered a local structural change in the active-site cleft, which might be related to substrate binding and product release. We also performed molecular docking studies by using the X-ray models of BsChe and cholesterol linoleate (CLL), the most favorable substrate for BsChe. The results showed that the sterol moieties of reasonable CLL docking poses localized to a specific active-site cleft surface formed by Leu266 and Ile287, which are unconserved among Burkholderia Lip homologs. Site-directed mutagenesis identified these residues as essential for the Che activity of BsChe, and Leu or Ile substitution conferred marked Che activity to Burkholderia Lips. In particular, Burkholderia cepacia and Burkholderia ubonensis Lips with the V266L/L287I double mutation exhibited ~50-fold and 500-fold higher Che activities than those of the wild-type enzymes, respectively. These results provide new insights into the substrate-binding mechanisms and selectivities of bacterial Lips.
ESTHER : Yasutake_2021_Int.J.Biol.Macromol_167_578
PubMedSearch : Yasutake_2021_Int.J.Biol.Macromol_167_578
PubMedID: 33279561
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9burk-EstA

Title : The Role of Brain Methamidophos in Acephate Poisoning in Mice - Tanaka_2021_J.UOEH_43_197
Author(s) : Tanaka T , Sato H , Yoshida K , Kasai K
Ref : J UOEH , 43 :197 , 2021
Abstract : We gave mice a 540 mg/kg dose of LD50 acephate, followed by an assessment of acephate, methamidophos (MP), and choline esterase (ChE) activity for up to 4 hours (hr) in order to investigate the time course of acephate intoxication. At 1 hr, the blood acephate and MP levels were 428 +/- 90 microg/ml (mean +/- SEM) and 4.2 +/- 0.4 microg/ ml, respectively. The liver acephate levels were similar to those in the blood, but the liver MP levels were approximately 3.5 times that of the blood at 1 hr. The brain MP level tended to be higher than the blood MP at 1 hr. These levels decreased gradually over 4 hr, but the brain acephate and MP levels surpassed the blood levels significantly at 4 hr, and after 2 hr, respectively. Serum, liver, cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem cholinesterase activity (ChE) were inhibited at 1 hr, and remained inhibited in all but the cerebellum until the end of the experiment. The obtained data were applied to previously reported autopsy cases of acephate intake. Experimental data suggest that brain MP is involved in acute acephate-induced poisoning, even after a reduction in blood acephate. In autopsy cases with suspected acephate poisoning, the MP level in the brain should be considered in addition to the ChE activity to diagnose the cause of death.
ESTHER : Tanaka_2021_J.UOEH_43_197
PubMedSearch : Tanaka_2021_J.UOEH_43_197
PubMedID: 34092764

Title : Production of recombinant extracellular cholesterol esterase using consistently active promoters in Burkholderia stabilis - Yoshida_2019_Biosci.Biotechnol.Biochem_83_1974
Author(s) : Yoshida K , Konishi K , Magana-Mora A , Rougny A , Yasutake Y , Muramatsu S , Murata S , Kumagai T , Aburatani S , Sakasegawa SI , Tamura T
Ref : Biosci Biotechnol Biochem , 83 :1974 , 2019
Abstract : Burkholderia stabilis FERMP-21014 produces highly active cholesterol esterase in the presence of fatty acids. To develop an overexpression system for cholesterol esterase production, we carried out RNA sequencing analyses to screen strongly active promoters in FERMP-21014. Based on gene expression consistency analysis, we selected nine genes that were consistently expressed at high levels, following which we constructed expression vectors using their promoter sequences and achieved overproduction of extracellular cholesterol esterase under fatty acid-free conditions. Of the tested promoters, the promoter of BSFP_0720, which encodes the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit AhpC, resulted in the highest cholesterol esterase activity (24.3 U mL(-1)). This activity level was 243-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain under fatty acid-free conditions. We confirmed that cholesterol esterase was secreted without excessive accumulation within the cells. The gene expression consistency analysis will be useful to screen promoters applicable to the overexpression of other industrially important enzymes.
ESTHER : Yoshida_2019_Biosci.Biotechnol.Biochem_83_1974
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_2019_Biosci.Biotechnol.Biochem_83_1974
PubMedID: 31216942
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9burk-EstA

Title : Dose adjustment of irinotecan based on UGT1A1 polymorphisms in patients with colorectal cancer - Fujii_2019_Cancer.Chemother.Pharmacol_83_123
Author(s) : Fujii H , Yamada Y , Watanabe D , Matsuhashi N , Takahashi T , Yoshida K , Suzuki A
Ref : Cancer Chemother Pharmacol , 83 :123 , 2019
Abstract : PURPOSE: Irinotecan is effective for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). SN-38 is an active metabolite of irinotecan, which is formed by carboxylesterase and inactivated by UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) 1A1. The UGT enzyme activity is reduced in patients with homozygous mutation in UGT1A1 genes (*6/*6, *28/*28 and *6/*28); thus dose reduction is required for prevention of severe adverse events associated with irinotecan. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between UGT1A1 polymorphisms and the incidence of adverse events or the therapeutic effect in mCRC patients who received irinotecan. METHODS: Sixty-three mCRC patients who received irinotecan during January 2014 and May 2018 were the subjects of this study. The incidence of adverse events, including diarrhea and neutropenia, and the therapeutic effect of irinotecan were compared among homozygous group, heterozygous group and wild-type group. The initial dose of irinotecan was 150 mg/m(2) in the heterozygous group and wild-type group, while the dose was reduced by 20% (120 mg/m(2)) in the homozygous group. RESULTS: The UGT1A1 polymorphisms occurred in 15.9%, 33.3%, and 50.8% for homozygous group, heterozygous group, and wild-type group, respectively. The average dose of irinotecan during overall cycles was not significantly different among three groups, despite the reduction of initial dose in homozygous group. There were no significant differences in the incidence rates of adverse events, tumor response, or time to treatment failure among three groups. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that dose reduction by 20% ensured safety and efficacy of irinotecan in mCRC patients with homozygous mutation in UGT1A1 genes.
ESTHER : Fujii_2019_Cancer.Chemother.Pharmacol_83_123
PubMedSearch : Fujii_2019_Cancer.Chemother.Pharmacol_83_123
PubMedID: 30377777

Title : Heparan Sulfate Organizes Neuronal Synapses through Neurexin Partnerships - Zhang_2018_Cell_174_1450
Author(s) : Zhang P , Lu H , Peixoto RT , Pines MK , Ge Y , Oku S , Siddiqui TJ , Xie Y , Wu W , Archer-Hartmann S , Yoshida K , Tanaka KF , Aricescu AR , Azadi P , Gordon MD , Sabatini BL , Wong ROL , Craig AM
Ref : Cell , 174 :1450 , 2018
Abstract : Synapses are fundamental units of communication in the brain. The prototypical synapse-organizing complex neurexin-neuroligin mediates synapse development and function and is central to a shared genetic risk pathway in autism and schizophrenia. Neurexin's role in synapse development is thought to be mediated purely by its protein domains, but we reveal a requirement for a rare glycan modification. Mice lacking heparan sulfate (HS) on neurexin-1 show reduced survival, as well as structural and functional deficits at central synapses. HS directly binds postsynaptic partners neuroligins and LRRTMs, revealing a dual binding mode involving intrinsic glycan and protein domains for canonical synapse-organizing complexes. Neurexin HS chains also bind novel ligands, potentially expanding the neurexin interactome to hundreds of HS-binding proteins. Because HS structure is heterogeneous, our findings indicate an additional dimension to neurexin diversity, provide a molecular basis for fine-tuning synaptic function, and open therapeutic directions targeting glycan-binding motifs critical for brain development.
ESTHER : Zhang_2018_Cell_174_1450
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2018_Cell_174_1450
PubMedID: 30100184

Title : Leak potassium channels regulate sleep duration - Yoshida_2018_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_115_E9459
Author(s) : Yoshida K , Shi S , Ukai-Tadenuma M , Fujishima H , Ohno RI , Ueda HR
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 115 :E9459 , 2018
Abstract : A primary goal of sleep research is to understand the molecular basis of sleep. Although some sleep/wake-promoting circuits and secreted substances have been identified, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of sleep duration have been elusive. Here, to address these mechanisms, we developed a simple computational model of a cortical neuron with five channels and a pump, which recapitulates the cortical electrophysiological characteristics of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and wakefulness. Comprehensive bifurcation and detailed mathematical analyses predicted that leak K(+) channels play a role in generating the electrophysiological characteristics of SWS, leading to a hypothesis that leak K(+) channels play a role in the regulation of sleep duration. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we comprehensively generated and analyzed 14 KO mice, and found that impairment of the leak K(+) channel (Kcnk9) decreased sleep duration. Based on these results, we hypothesize that leak K(+) channels regulate sleep duration in mammals.
ESTHER : Yoshida_2018_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_115_E9459
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_2018_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_115_E9459
PubMedID: 30224462

Title : The Apostasia genome and the evolution of orchids - Zhang_2017_Nature_549_379
Author(s) : Zhang GQ , Liu KW , Li Z , Lohaus R , Hsiao YY , Niu SC , Wang JY , Lin YC , Xu Q , Chen LJ , Yoshida K , Fujiwara S , Wang ZW , Zhang YQ , Mitsuda N , Wang M , Liu GH , Pecoraro L , Huang HX , Xiao XJ , Lin M , Wu XY , Wu WL , Chen YY , Chang SB , Sakamoto S , Ohme-Takagi M , Yagi M , Zeng SJ , Shen CY , Yeh CM , Luo YB , Tsai WC , Van de Peer Y , Liu ZJ
Ref : Nature , 549 :379 , 2017
Abstract : Constituting approximately 10% of flowering plant species, orchids (Orchidaceae) display unique flower morphologies, possess an extraordinary diversity in lifestyle, and have successfully colonized almost every habitat on Earth. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Apostasia shenzhenica, a representative of one of two genera that form a sister lineage to the rest of the Orchidaceae, providing a reference for inferring the genome content and structure of the most recent common ancestor of all extant orchids and improving our understanding of their origins and evolution. In addition, we present transcriptome data for representatives of Vanilloideae, Cypripedioideae and Orchidoideae, and novel third-generation genome data for two species of Epidendroideae, covering all five orchid subfamilies. A. shenzhenica shows clear evidence of a whole-genome duplication, which is shared by all orchids and occurred shortly before their divergence. Comparisons between A. shenzhenica and other orchids and angiosperms also permitted the reconstruction of an ancestral orchid gene toolkit. We identify new gene families, gene family expansions and contractions, and changes within MADS-box gene classes, which control a diverse suite of developmental processes, during orchid evolution. This study sheds new light on the genetic mechanisms underpinning key orchid innovations, including the development of the labellum and gynostemium, pollinia, and seeds without endosperm, as well as the evolution of epiphytism; reveals relationships between the Orchidaceae subfamilies; and helps clarify the evolutionary history of orchids within the angiosperms.
ESTHER : Zhang_2017_Nature_549_379
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2017_Nature_549_379
PubMedID: 28902843
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9aspa-a0a2i0b2l6 , 9aspa-a0a2i0w093 , 9aspa-a0a2i0asr1 , 9aspa-a0a2i0vyy1 , 9aspa-a0a2i0a218 , 9aspa-a0a2i0x5j6 , 9aspa-a0a2i0aji0 , 9aspa-a0a2i0a3k8 , 9aspa-a0a2i0win6 , 9aspa-a0a2i0vg82 , 9aspa-a0a2h9zyy3

Title : Synthetically useful variants of industrial lipases from Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas fluorescens - Yoshida_2017_Org.Biomol.Chem_15_8713
Author(s) : Yoshida K , Ono M , Yamamoto T , Utsumi T , Koikeda S , Ema T
Ref : Org Biomol Chem , 15 :8713 , 2017
Abstract : Industrial enzymes lipase PS (LPS) and lipase AK (LAK), which originate from Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, are synthetically useful biocatalysts. To strengthen their catalytic performances, we introduced two mutations into hot spots of the active sites (residues 287 and 290). The LPS_L287F/I290A double mutant showed high catalytic activity and enantioselectivity for poor substrates for which the wild-type enzyme showed very low activity. The LAK_V287F/I290A double mutant was also an excellent biocatalyst with expanded substrate scope, which was comparable to the LPS_L287F/I290A double mutant. Thermodynamic parameters were determined to address the origin of the high enantioselectivity of the double mutant. The deltadeltaH() term, but not the deltadeltaS() term, was predominant, which suggests that the enantioselectivity is driven by a differential energy associated with intermolecular interactions around Phe287 and Ala290. A remarkable solvent effect was observed, giving a bell-shaped profile between the E values and the log P or sigma values of solvents with the highest E value in i-Pr(2)O. This suggests that an organic solvent with appropriate hydrophobicity and polarity provides the double mutant with some flexibility that is essential for excellent catalytic performance.
ESTHER : Yoshida_2017_Org.Biomol.Chem_15_8713
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_2017_Org.Biomol.Chem_15_8713
PubMedID: 28956057

Title : The Dendrobium catenatum Lindl. genome sequence provides insights into polysaccharide synthase, floral development and adaptive evolution - Zhang_2016_Sci.Rep_6_19029
Author(s) : Zhang GQ , Xu Q , Bian C , Tsai WC , Yeh CM , Liu KW , Yoshida K , Zhang LS , Chang SB , Chen F , Shi Y , Su YY , Zhang YQ , Chen LJ , Yin Y , Lin M , Huang H , Deng H , Wang ZW , Zhu SL , Zhao X , Deng C , Niu SC , Huang J , Wang M , Liu GH , Yang HJ , Xiao XJ , Hsiao YY , Wu WL , Chen YY , Mitsuda N , Ohme-Takagi M , Luo YB , Van de Peer Y , Liu ZJ
Ref : Sci Rep , 6 :19029 , 2016
Abstract : Orchids make up about 10% of all seed plant species, have great economical value, and are of specific scientific interest because of their renowned flowers and ecological adaptations. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a lithophytic orchid, Dendrobium catenatum. We predict 28,910 protein-coding genes, and find evidence of a whole genome duplication shared with Phalaenopsis. We observed the expansion of many resistance-related genes, suggesting a powerful immune system responsible for adaptation to a wide range of ecological niches. We also discovered extensive duplication of genes involved in glucomannan synthase activities, likely related to the synthesis of medicinal polysaccharides. Expansion of MADS-box gene clades ANR1, StMADS11, and MIKC(*), involved in the regulation of development and growth, suggests that these expansions are associated with the astonishing diversity of plant architecture in the genus Dendrobium. On the contrary, members of the type I MADS box gene family are missing, which might explain the loss of the endospermous seed. The findings reported here will be important for future studies into polysaccharide synthesis, adaptations to diverse environments and flower architecture of Orchidaceae.
ESTHER : Zhang_2016_Sci.Rep_6_19029
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2016_Sci.Rep_6_19029
PubMedID: 26754549
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9aspa-a0a2i0w093 , 9aspa-a0a2i0vyy1 , 9aspa-a0a2i0x5j6 , 9aspa-a0a2i0win6 , 9aspa-a0a2i0vg82

Title : Comparison of three tannases cloned from closely related lactobacillus species: L. Plantarum, L. Paraplantarum, and L. Pentosus - Ueda_2014_BMC.Microbiol_14_87
Author(s) : Ueda S , Nomoto R , Yoshida K , Osawa R
Ref : BMC Microbiol , 14 :87 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Tannase (tannin acyl hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.20) specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the galloyl ester bonds in hydrolyzable tannins to release gallic acid. The enzyme was found not only in fungal species but also many bacterial species including Lactobacillus plantarum, L. paraplantarum, and L. pentosus. Recently, we identified and expressed a tannase gene of L. plantarum, tanLpl, to show remarkable differences to characterized fungal tannases. However, little is known about genes responsible for tannase activities of L. paraplantarum and L. pentosus. We here identify the tannase genes (i.e. tanLpa and tanLpe) of the above lactobacilli species, and describe their molecular diversity among the strains as well as enzymological difference between species inclusive of L. plantarum. RESULTS: The genes encoding tannase, designated tanLpa and tanLpe, were cloned from Lactobacillus paraplantarum NSO120 and Lactobacillus pentosus 21A-3, which shared 88% and 72% amino acid identity with TanLpl, cloned from Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917(T), respectively. These three enzymes could comprise a novel tannase subfamily of independent lineage, because no other tannases in the databases share significant sequence similarity with them. Each of tanLpl, tanLpa, and tanLpe was expressed in Bacillus subtilis RIK 1285 and recombinant enzymes were secreted and purified. The K(m) values of the enzymes on each galloyl ester were comparable; however, the k(cat)/K(m) values of TanLpa for EGCg, ECg, Cg, and GCg were markedly higher than those for TanLpl and TanLpe. Their enzymological properties were compared to reveal differences at least in substrate specificity. CONCLUSION: Two tannase genes responsible for tannase activities of L. paraplantarum and L. pentosus were identified and characterized. TanLpl, TanLpa and TanLpe forming a phylogenetic cluster in the known bacterial tannase genes and had a limited diversity in each other. Their enzymological properties were compared to reveal differences at least in substrate specificity. This is the first comparative study of closely related bacterial tannases.
ESTHER : Ueda_2014_BMC.Microbiol_14_87
PubMedSearch : Ueda_2014_BMC.Microbiol_14_87
PubMedID: 24708557

Title : Discovery and preclinical profile of teneligliptin (3-[(2S,4S)-4-[4-(3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)piperazin-1-yl]pyrrolidin-2-y lcarbonyl]thiazolidine): a highly potent, selective, long-lasting and orally active dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes - Yoshida_2012_Bioorg.Med.Chem_20_5705
Author(s) : Yoshida T , Akahoshi F , Sakashita H , Kitajima H , Nakamura M , Sonda S , Takeuchi M , Tanaka Y , Ueda N , Sekiguchi S , Ishige T , Shima K , Nabeno M , Abe Y , Anabuki J , Soejima A , Yoshida K , Takashina Y , Ishii S , Kiuchi S , Fukuda S , Tsutsumiuchi R , Kosaka K , Murozono T , Nakamaru Y , Utsumi H , Masutomi N , Kishida H , Miyaguchi I , Hayashi Y
Ref : Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry , 20 :5705 , 2012
Abstract : Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibition is suitable mechanism for once daily oral dosing regimen because of its low risk of hypoglycemia. We explored linked bicyclic heteroarylpiperazines substituted at the gamma-position of the proline structure in the course of the investigation of l-prolylthiazolidines. The efforts led to the discovery of a highly potent, selective, long-lasting and orally active DPP-4 inhibitor, 3-[(2S,4S)-4-[4-(3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)piperazin-1-yl]pyrrolidin-2-yl carbonyl]thiazolidine (8 g), which has a unique structure characterized by five consecutive rings. An X-ray co-crystal structure of 8 g in DPP-4 demonstrated that the key interaction between the phenyl ring on the pyrazole and the S(2) extensive subsite of DPP-4 not only boosted potency, but also increased selectivity. Compound 8 g, at 0.03 mg/kg or higher doses, significantly inhibited the increase of plasma glucose levels after an oral glucose load in Zucker fatty rats. Compound 8 g (teneligliptin) has been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in Japan.
ESTHER : Yoshida_2012_Bioorg.Med.Chem_20_5705
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_2012_Bioorg.Med.Chem_20_5705
PubMedID: 22959556
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-DPP4

Title : Pharmacological profile of the novel anti-inflammatory corticosteroid NS-126, a therapeutic agent for allergic rhinitis - Inoue_2010_J.Pharmacol.Sci_112_73
Author(s) : Inoue N , Hashino A , Kageyama K , Zhang X , Sasagawa T , Kawakita N , Takahashi Y , Yoshida K , Hashimoto M , Mori K , Kyoi T
Ref : J Pharmacol Sci , 112 :73 , 2010
Abstract : NS-126 (9-fluoro-11beta,17,21-trihydroxy-16alpha-methylpregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione 21-cyclohexanecarboxylate 17-cyclopropanecarboxylate) is a novel, highly lipophilic anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. We compared NS-126 and the widely used intranasal corticosteroid fluticasone propionate (FP) in a guinea-pig model of allergic rhinitis and a rat model of airway eosinophilia. In the allergic rhinitis model, NS-126 and FP reduced sneezing and nasal obstruction to similar extents. In the airway eosinophilia model, both compounds inhibited the infiltration of eosinophils into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but the effect of NS-126 was longer-lasting than that of FP. In vitro, NS-126 showed lower affinity than FP for the glucocorticoid receptor and was a weaker inhibitor of Th(2) cytokine and chemokine production and mast-cell secretory responses. We also investigated DX-17-CPC, a metabolite of NS-126 generated in nasal tissue by carboxylesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis at the 17-position. DX-17-CPC showed greater affinity than NS-126 for the glucocorticoid receptor and was a stronger inhibitor of Th(2) cytokine and chemokine production and mast-cell secretory responses. The long duration of the anti-allergic effects of NS-126 may be explained by its high lipophilicity, while the strength of its anti-allergic effects may be explained by the generation of the active metabolite DX-17-CPC. NS-126 is a long-acting intranasal corticosteroid and a promising therapeutic agent for allergic rhinitis.
ESTHER : Inoue_2010_J.Pharmacol.Sci_112_73
PubMedSearch : Inoue_2010_J.Pharmacol.Sci_112_73
PubMedID: 20051657

Title : Donepezil reverses buprenorphine-induced central respiratory depression in anesthetized rabbits - Sakuraba_2009_Biol.Res_42_469
Author(s) : Sakuraba S , Tsujita M , Arisaka H , Takeda J , Yoshida K , Kuwana S
Ref : Biol Res , 42 :469 , 2009
Abstract : Buprenorphine is a mixed opioid receptor agonist-antagonist used in acute and chronic pain management. Although this agent's analgesic effect increases in a dose-dependent manner, buprenorphine-induced respiratory depression shows a marked ceiling effect at higher doses, which is considered to be an indicator of safety. Nevertheless, cases of overdose mortality or severe respiratory depression associated with buprenorphine use have been reported. Naloxone can reverse buprenorphine-induced respiratory depression, but is slow-acting and unstable, meaning that new drug candidates able to specifically antagonize buprenorphine-induced respiratory depression are needed in order to enable maximal analgesic effect without respiratory depression. Acetylcholine is an excitatory neurotransmitter in central respiratory control. We previously showed that a long-acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, antagonizes morphine-induced respiratory depression. We have now investigated how donepezil affects buprenorphine-induced respiratory depression in anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated rabbits. We measured phrenic nerve discharge as an Index of respiratory rate and amplitude, and compared discharges following the injection of buprenorphine with discharges following the injection of donepezil. Buprenorphine-induced suppression of the respiratory rate and respiratory amplitude was antagonized by donepezil (78.4 +/- 4.8 %, 92.3% +/- 22.8 % of control, respectively). These findings indicate that systemically administered donepezil restores buprenorphine-induced respiratory depression in anesthetized rabbits.
ESTHER : Sakuraba_2009_Biol.Res_42_469
PubMedSearch : Sakuraba_2009_Biol.Res_42_469
PubMedID: 20140302

Title : Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny - Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
Author(s) : Clark AG , Eisen MB , Smith DR , Bergman CM , Oliver B , Markow TA , Kaufman TC , Kellis M , Gelbart W , Iyer VN , Pollard DA , Sackton TB , Larracuente AM , Singh ND , Abad JP , Abt DN , Adryan B , Aguade M , Akashi H , Anderson WW , Aquadro CF , Ardell DH , Arguello R , Artieri CG , Barbash DA , Barker D , Barsanti P , Batterham P , Batzoglou S , Begun D , Bhutkar A , Blanco E , Bosak SA , Bradley RK , Brand AD , Brent MR , Brooks AN , Brown RH , Butlin RK , Caggese C , Calvi BR , Bernardo de Carvalho A , Caspi A , Castrezana S , Celniker SE , Chang JL , Chapple C , Chatterji S , Chinwalla A , Civetta A , Clifton SW , Comeron JM , Costello JC , Coyne JA , Daub J , David RG , Delcher AL , Delehaunty K , Do CB , Ebling H , Edwards K , Eickbush T , Evans JD , Filipski A , Findeiss S , Freyhult E , Fulton L , Fulton R , Garcia AC , Gardiner A , Garfield DA , Garvin BE , Gibson G , Gilbert D , Gnerre S , Godfrey J , Good R , Gotea V , Gravely B , Greenberg AJ , Griffiths-Jones S , Gross S , Guigo R , Gustafson EA , Haerty W , Hahn MW , Halligan DL , Halpern AL , Halter GM , Han MV , Heger A , Hillier L , Hinrichs AS , Holmes I , Hoskins RA , Hubisz MJ , Hultmark D , Huntley MA , Jaffe DB , Jagadeeshan S , Jeck WR , Johnson J , Jones CD , Jordan WC , Karpen GH , Kataoka E , Keightley PD , Kheradpour P , Kirkness EF , Koerich LB , Kristiansen K , Kudrna D , Kulathinal RJ , Kumar S , Kwok R , Lander E , Langley CH , Lapoint R , Lazzaro BP , Lee SJ , Levesque L , Li R , Lin CF , Lin MF , Lindblad-Toh K , Llopart A , Long M , Low L , Lozovsky E , Lu J , Luo M , Machado CA , Makalowski W , Marzo M , Matsuda M , Matzkin L , McAllister B , McBride CS , McKernan B , McKernan K , Mendez-Lago M , Minx P , Mollenhauer MU , Montooth K , Mount SM , Mu X , Myers E , Negre B , Newfeld S , Nielsen R , Noor MA , O'Grady P , Pachter L , Papaceit M , Parisi MJ , Parisi M , Parts L , Pedersen JS , Pesole G , Phillippy AM , Ponting CP , Pop M , Porcelli D , Powell JR , Prohaska S , Pruitt K , Puig M , Quesneville H , Ram KR , Rand D , Rasmussen MD , Reed LK , Reenan R , Reily A , Remington KA , Rieger TT , Ritchie MG , Robin C , Rogers YH , Rohde C , Rozas J , Rubenfield MJ , Ruiz A , Russo S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez-Gracia A , Saranga DJ , Sato H , Schaeffer SW , Schatz MC , Schlenke T , Schwartz R , Segarra C , Singh RS , Sirot L , Sirota M , Sisneros NB , Smith CD , Smith TF , Spieth J , Stage DE , Stark A , Stephan W , Strausberg RL , Strempel S , Sturgill D , Sutton G , Sutton GG , Tao W , Teichmann S , Tobari YN , Tomimura Y , Tsolas JM , Valente VL , Venter E , Venter JC , Vicario S , Vieira FG , Vilella AJ , Villasante A , Walenz B , Wang J , Wasserman M , Watts T , Wilson D , Wilson RK , Wing RA , Wolfner MF , Wong A , Wong GK , Wu CI , Wu G , Yamamoto D , Yang HP , Yang SP , Yorke JA , Yoshida K , Zdobnov E , Zhang P , Zhang Y , Zimin AV , Baldwin J , Abdouelleil A , Abdulkadir J , Abebe A , Abera B , Abreu J , Acer SC , Aftuck L , Alexander A , An P , Anderson E , Anderson S , Arachi H , Azer M , Bachantsang P , Barry A , Bayul T , Berlin A , Bessette D , Bloom T , Blye J , Boguslavskiy L , Bonnet C , Boukhgalter B , Bourzgui I , Brown A , Cahill P , Channer S , Cheshatsang Y , Chuda L , Citroen M , Collymore A , Cooke P , Costello M , D'Aco K , Daza R , De Haan G , DeGray S , DeMaso C , Dhargay N , Dooley K , Dooley E , Doricent M , Dorje P , Dorjee K , Dupes A , Elong R , Falk J , Farina A , Faro S , Ferguson D , Fisher S , Foley CD , Franke A , Friedrich D , Gadbois L , Gearin G , Gearin CR , Giannoukos G , Goode T , Graham J , Grandbois E , Grewal S , Gyaltsen K , Hafez N , Hagos B , Hall J , Henson C , Hollinger A , Honan T , Huard MD , Hughes L , Hurhula B , Husby ME , Kamat A , Kanga B , Kashin S , Khazanovich D , Kisner P , Lance K , Lara M , Lee W , Lennon N , Letendre F , LeVine R , Lipovsky A , Liu X , Liu J , Liu S , Lokyitsang T , Lokyitsang Y , Lubonja R , Lui A , Macdonald P , Magnisalis V , Maru K , Matthews C , McCusker W , McDonough S , Mehta T , Meldrim J , Meneus L , Mihai O , Mihalev A , Mihova T , Mittelman R , Mlenga V , Montmayeur A , Mulrain L , Navidi A , Naylor J , Negash T , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nicol R , Norbu C , Norbu N , Novod N , O'Neill B , Osman S , Markiewicz E , Oyono OL , Patti C , Phunkhang P , Pierre F , Priest M , Raghuraman S , Rege F , Reyes R , Rise C , Rogov P , Ross K , Ryan E , Settipalli S , Shea T , Sherpa N , Shi L , Shih D , Sparrow T , Spaulding J , Stalker J , Stange-Thomann N , Stavropoulos S , Stone C , Strader C , Tesfaye S , Thomson T , Thoulutsang Y , Thoulutsang D , Topham K , Topping I , Tsamla T , Vassiliev H , Vo A , Wangchuk T , Wangdi T , Weiand M , Wilkinson J , Wilson A , Yadav S , Young G , Yu Q , Zembek L , Zhong D , Zimmer A , Zwirko Z , Alvarez P , Brockman W , Butler J , Chin C , Grabherr M , Kleber M , Mauceli E , MacCallum I
Ref : Nature , 450 :203 , 2007
Abstract : Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.
ESTHER : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedSearch : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedID: 17994087
Gene_locus related to this paper: droan-ACHE , droan-b3lx10 , droan-b3lx75 , droan-b3lxv7 , droan-b3ly87 , droan-b3lyh4 , droan-b3lyh5 , droan-b3lyh7 , droan-b3lyh9 , droan-b3lyi0 , droan-b3lyi2 , droan-b3lyi3 , droan-b3lyi4 , droan-b3lyj8 , droan-b3lyj9 , droan-b3lyx4 , droan-b3lyx5 , droan-b3lyx6 , droan-b3lyx7 , droan-b3lyx9 , droan-b3lz72 , droan-b3m1x3 , droan-b3m2d4 , droan-b3m3d9 , droan-b3m4e3 , droan-b3m5w1 , droan-b3m6i7 , droan-b3m7v2 , droan-b3m9a5 , droan-b3m9f4 , droan-b3m9p3 , droan-b3m254 , droan-b3m259 , droan-b3m260 , droan-b3m262 , droan-b3m524 , droan-b3m635 , droan-b3m845 , droan-b3m846 , droan-b3md01 , droan-b3mdh7 , droan-b3mdm6 , droan-b3mdw8 , droan-b3mee1 , droan-b3mf47 , droan-b3mf48 , droan-b3mg94 , droan-b3mgk2 , droan-b3mgn6 , droan-b3mii3 , droan-b3mjk2 , droan-b3mjk3 , droan-b3mjk4 , droan-b3mjk5 , droan-b3mjl2 , droan-b3mjl4 , droan-b3mjl7 , droan-b3mjl9 , droan-b3mjm8 , droan-b3mjm9 , droan-b3mjs6 , droan-b3mkr0 , droan-b3ml20 , droan-b3mly4 , droan-b3mly5 , droan-b3mly6 , droan-b3mmm8 , droan-b3mnb5 , droan-b3mny9 , droan-b3mtj5 , droan-b3muw4 , droan-b3muw8 , droan-b3n0e7 , droan-b3n2j7 , droan-b3n247 , droan-c5idb2 , droer-ACHE , droer-b3n5c7 , droer-b3n5d0 , droer-b3n5d8 , droer-b3n5d9 , droer-b3n5t7 , droer-b3n5y4 , droer-b3n7d2 , droer-b3n7d3 , droer-b3n7d4 , droer-b3n7k8 , droer-b3n8e4 , droer-b3n8f7 , droer-b3n8f8 , droer-b3n9e1 , droer-b3n319 , droer-b3n547 , droer-b3n549 , droer-b3n558 , droer-b3n560 , droer-b3n577 , droer-b3n612 , droer-b3nar5 , droer-b3nb91 , droer-b3nct9 , droer-b3nd53 , droer-b3ndh9 , droer-b3ndq8 , droer-b3ne66 , droer-b3ne67 , droer-b3ne97 , droer-b3nfk3 , droer-b3nfq9 , droer-b3nim7 , droer-b3nkn2 , droer-b3nm11 , droer-b3nmh4 , droer-b3nmy2 , droer-b3npx2 , droer-b3npx3 , droer-b3nq76 , droer-b3nqg9 , droer-b3nqm8 , droer-b3nr28 , droer-b3nrd3 , droer-b3nst4 , droer-b3nwa7 , droer-b3nyp5.1 , droer-b3nyp5.2 , droer-b3nyp6 , droer-b3nyp7 , droer-b3nyp8 , droer-b3nyp9 , droer-b3nyq3 , droer-b3nz06 , droer-b3nz14 , droer-b3nzj0 , droer-b3p0c0 , droer-b3p0c1 , droer-b3p0c2 , droer-b3p2x6 , droer-b3p2x7 , droer-b3p2x9 , droer-b3p2y1 , droer-b3p2y2 , droer-b3p6d4 , droer-b3p6d5 , droer-b3p6w3 , droer-b3p7b4 , droer-b3p7h9 , droer-b3p152 , droer-b3p486 , droer-b3p487 , droer-b3p488 , droer-b3p489 , droer-EST6 , droer-q670j5 , drogr-ACHE , drogr-b4iwp3 , drogr-b4iww3 , drogr-b4iwy3 , drogr-b4ixf7 , drogr-b4ixh4 , drogr-b4iyz5 , drogr-b4j2s2 , drogr-b4j2u8 , drogr-b4j3u1 , drogr-b4j3v3 , drogr-b4j4g7 , drogr-b4j4x9 , drogr-b4j6e6 , drogr-b4j9c9 , drogr-b4j9y4 , drogr-b4j156 , drogr-b4j384 , drogr-b4j605 , drogr-b4j685 , drogr-b4ja76 , drogr-b4jay5 , drogr-b4jcf0 , drogr-b4jcf1 , drogr-b4jdg6 , drogr-b4jdg7 , drogr-b4jdh6 , drogr-b4jdz1 , drogr-b4jdz2 , drogr-b4jdz4 , drogr-b4je66 , drogr-b4je79 , drogr-b4je82 , drogr-b4je88 , drogr-b4je89 , drogr-b4je90 , drogr-b4je91 , drogr-b4jf76 , drogr-b4jf79 , drogr-b4jf80 , drogr-b4jf81 , drogr-b4jf82 , drogr-b4jf83 , drogr-b4jf84 , drogr-b4jf85 , drogr-b4jf87 , drogr-b4jf91 , drogr-b4jf92 , drogr-b4jg66 , drogr-b4jgh0 , drogr-b4jgh1 , drogr-b4jgr9 , drogr-b4ji67 , drogr-b4jls2 , drogr-b4jnh9 , drogr-b4jpc6 , drogr-b4jpq3 , drogr-b4jpx9 , drogr-b4jql2 , drogr-b4jrh5 , drogr-b4jsb2 , drogr-b4jth3 , drogr-b4jti1 , drogr-b4jul5 , drogr-b4jur4 , drogr-b4jvh3 , drogr-b4jz00 , drogr-b4jz03 , drogr-b4jz04 , drogr-b4jz05 , drogr-b4jzh2 , drogr-b4k0u2 , drogr-b4k2r1 , drogr-b4k234 , drogr-b4k235 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG11626 , drome-GH02439 , dromo-ACHE , dromo-b4k6a7 , dromo-b4k6a8 , dromo-b4k6q8 , dromo-b4k6q9 , dromo-b4k6r1 , dromo-b4k6r3 , dromo-b4k6r4 , dromo-b4k6r5 , dromo-b4k6r6 , dromo-b4k6r7 , dromo-b4k6r8 , dromo-b4k6r9 , dromo-b4k6s0 , dromo-b4k6s1 , dromo-b4k6s2 , dromo-b4k9c7 , dromo-b4k9d3 , dromo-b4k571 , dromo-b4k721 , dromo-b4ka74 , dromo-b4ka89 , dromo-b4kaj4 , dromo-b4kc20 , dromo-b4kcl2 , dromo-b4kcl3 , dromo-b4kd55.1 , dromo-b4kd55.2 , dromo-b4kd56 , dromo-b4kd57 , dromo-b4kde1 , dromo-b4kdg2 , dromo-b4kdh4 , dromo-b4kdh5 , dromo-b4kdh6 , dromo-A0A0Q9XDF2 , dromo-b4kdh8.1 , dromo-b4kdh8.2 , dromo-b4kg04 , dromo-b4kg05 , dromo-b4kg06 , dromo-b4kg16 , dromo-b4kg44 , dromo-b4kg90 , dromo-b4kh20 , dromo-b4kh21 , dromo-b4kht7 , dromo-b4kid3 , dromo-b4kik0 , dromo-b4kjx0 , dromo-b4kki1 , dromo-b4kkp6 , dromo-b4kkp8 , dromo-b4kkq8 , dromo-b4kkr0 , dromo-b4kkr3 , dromo-b4kkr4 , dromo-b4kks0 , dromo-b4kks1 , dromo-b4kks2 , dromo-b4kla1 , dromo-b4klv8 , dromo-b4knt4 , dromo-b4kp08 , dromo-b4kp16 , dromo-b4kqa6 , dromo-b4kqa7 , dromo-b4kqa8 , dromo-b4kqh1 , dromo-b4kst4 , dromo-b4ksy6 , dromo-b4kt84 , dromo-b4ktf5 , dromo-b4ktf6 , dromo-b4kvl3 , dromo-b4kvw2 , dromo-b4kwv4 , dromo-b4kwv5 , dromo-b4kxz6 , dromo-b4ky12 , dromo-b4ky36 , dromo-b4ky44 , dromo-b4kzu7 , dromo-b4l0n8 , dromo-b4l4u5 , dromo-b4l6l9 , dromo-b4l084 , drope-ACHE , drope-b4g3s6 , drope-b4g4p7 , drope-b4g6v4 , drope-b4g8m0 , drope-b4g8n6 , drope-b4g8n7 , drope-b4g9p2 , drope-b4g815 , drope-b4g816 , drope-b4gat7 , drope-b4gav5 , drope-b4gb05 , drope-b4gc08 , drope-b4gcr3 , drope-b4gdk2 , drope-b4gdl9 , drope-b4gdv9 , drope-b4gei8 , drope-b4gei9 , drope-b4gej0 , drope-b4ghz9 , drope-b4gj62 , drope-b4gj64 , drope-b4gj74 , drope-b4gkf4 , drope-b4gkv2 , drope-b4gky9 , drope-b4gl76 , drope-b4glf3 , drope-b4gmt3 , drope-b4gmt7 , drope-b4gmt9 , drope-b4gmu2 , drope-b4gmu3 , drope-b4gmu4 , drope-b4gmu5 , drope-b4gmu6 , drope-b4gmu7 , drope-b4gmv1 , drope-b4gn08 , drope-b4gpa7 , drope-b4gq13 , drope-b4grh7 , drope-b4gsf9 , drope-b4gsw4 , drope-b4gsw5 , drope-b4gsx2 , drope-b4gsx7 , drope-b4gsy6 , drope-b4gsy7 , drope-b4guj8 , drope-b4gw36 , drope-b4gzc2 , drope-b4gzc6 , drope-b4gzc7 , drope-b4h4p9 , drope-b4h5l3 , drope-b4h6a0 , drope-b4h6a8 , drope-b4h6a9 , drope-b4h6b0 , drope-b4h7m7 , drope-b4h462 , drope-b4h601 , drope-b4h602 , drope-b4hay1 , drope-b4hb18 , drope-est5a , drope-est5b , drope-est5c , drops-ACHE , drops-b5dhd2 , drops-b5dk96 , drops-b5dpe3 , drops-b5drp9 , drops-b5dwa7 , drops-b5dwa8 , drops-b5dz85 , drops-b5dz86 , drops-est5a , drops-est5b , drops-q29bq2 , drops-q29dd7 , drops-q29ew0 , drops-q291d5 , drops-q291e8 , drops-q293n1 , drops-q293n4 , drops-q293n5 , drops-q293n6 , drops-q294n6 , drops-q294n7 , drops-q294n9 , drops-q294p4 , drose-b4he97 , drose-b4hfu2 , drose-b4hg54 , drose-b4hga0 , drose-b4hgu9 , drose-b4hgv0 , drose-b4hgv3 , drose-b4hgv4 , drose-b4hhm8 , drose-b4hhs6 , drose-b4hie4 , drose-b4him9 , drose-b4hk63 , drose-b4hkj5 , drose-b4hr07 , drose-b4hr81 , drose-b4hre7 , drose-b4hs13 , drose-b4hsj9 , drose-b4hsk0 , drose-b4hsm8 , drose-b4hvr5 , drose-b4hwr7 , drose-b4hwr8 , drose-b4hwr9 , drose-b4hws6 , drose-b4hws7 , drose-b4hwt0 , drose-b4hwt2 , drose-b4hwu1 , drose-b4hwu2 , drose-b4hxs9 , drose-b4hxu4 , drose-b4hxz1 , drose-b4hyp8 , drose-b4hyp9 , drose-b4hyq0 , drose-b4hyz4 , drose-b4hyz5 , drose-b4i1k8 , drose-b4i2f3 , drose-b4i2w5 , drose-b4i4u3 , drose-b4i4u7 , drose-b4i4u9 , drose-b4i4v0 , drose-b4i4v1 , drose-b4i4v4 , drose-b4i4v5 , drose-b4i4v6 , drose-b4i4v7 , drose-b4i4v8 , drose-b4i4w0 , drose-b4i7s6 , drose-b4i133 , drose-b4i857 , drose-b4iam7 , drose-b4iam9 , drose-b4iaq6 , drose-b4icf6 , drose-b4icf7 , drose-b4id80 , drose-b4ifc5 , drose-b4ihv9 , drose-b4iie9 , drose-b4ilj8 , drose-b4in13 , drose-b4inj9 , drosi-ACHE , drosi-aes04a , drosi-b4nsh8 , drosi-b4q3d7 , drosi-b4q4w5 , drosi-b4q4y7 , drosi-b4q6h6 , drosi-b4q7u2 , drosi-b4q7u3 , drosi-b4q9c6 , drosi-b4q9c7 , drosi-b4q9d3 , drosi-b4q9d4 , drosi-b4q9r0 , drosi-b4q9r1 , drosi-b4q9r3 , drosi-b4q9s2 , drosi-b4q9s3 , drosi-b4q429 , drosi-b4q530 , drosi-b4q734 , drosi-b4q782 , drosi-b4q783 , drosi-b4q942 , drosi-b4qet1 , drosi-b4qfv6 , drosi-b4qge5 , drosi-b4qgh5 , drosi-b4qgs5 , drosi-b4qhf3 , drosi-b4qhf4 , drosi-b4qhi5 , drosi-b4qjr2 , drosi-b4qjr3 , drosi-b4qjv6 , drosi-b4qk23 , drosi-b4qk51 , drosi-b4qlt1 , drosi-b4qlz9 , drosi-b4qmn9 , drosi-b4qrq7 , drosi-b4qs01 , drosi-b4qs57 , drosi-b4qs82 , drosi-b4qs83 , drosi-b4qs84 , drosi-b4qs85 , drosi-b4qs86 , drosi-b4qsq1 , drosi-b4quk6 , drosi-b4qvg5 , drosi-b4qvg6 , drosi-b4qzn2 , drosi-b4qzn3 , drosi-b4qzn5 , drosi-b4qzn7 , drosi-b4qzn8 , drosi-b4qzp2 , drosi-b4qzp3 , drosi-b4qzp4 , drosi-b4qzp5 , drosi-b4qzp6 , drosi-b4qzp7 , drosi-b4r1a4 , drosi-b4r025 , drosi-b4r207 , drosi-b4r662 , drosi-este6 , drosi-q670k8 , drovi-ACHE , drovi-b4lev2 , drovi-b4lf33 , drovi-b4lf51 , drovi-b4lg54 , drovi-b4lg72 , drovi-b4lgc6 , drovi-b4lgd5 , drovi-b4lgg0 , drovi-b4lgk5 , drovi-b4lgn2 , drovi-b4lh17 , drovi-b4lh18 , drovi-b4lk43 , drovi-b4ll59 , drovi-b4ll60 , drovi-b4llm5 , drovi-b4lln3 , drovi-b4lmk4 , drovi-b4lmp0 , drovi-b4lnr4 , drovi-b4lp47 , drovi-b4lpd0 , drovi-b4lps0 , drovi-b4lqc6 , drovi-b4lr00 , drovi-b4lrp6 , drovi-b4lrw2 , drovi-b4lse7 , drovi-b4lse9 , drovi-b4lsf0 , drovi-b4lsn0 , drovi-b4lsq5 , drovi-b4lt32 , drovi-b4ltr1 , drovi-b4lui7 , drovi-b4lui9 , drovi-b4luj8 , drovi-b4luk0 , drovi-b4luk3 , drovi-b4luk8 , drovi-b4luk9 , drovi-b4lul0 , drovi-b4lve2 , drovi-b4lxi9 , drovi-b4lxj8 , drovi-b4lyf3 , drovi-b4lyq2 , drovi-b4lyq3 , drovi-b4lz07 , drovi-b4lz13 , drovi-b4lz14 , drovi-b4lz15 , drovi-b4m0j7 , drovi-b4m0s0 , drovi-b4m2b6 , drovi-b4m4h7 , drovi-b4m4h8 , drovi-b4m4i0 , drovi-b4m4i2 , drovi-b4m4i3.A , drovi-b4m4i3.B , drovi-b4m4i4 , drovi-b4m4i5 , drovi-b4m4i6 , drovi-b4m4i7 , drovi-b4m4i8 , drovi-b4m4i9 , drovi-b4m4j2 , drovi-b4m5a0 , drovi-b4m5a1 , drovi-b4m5a2 , drovi-b4m6b9 , drovi-b4m7k9 , drovi-b4m9g9 , drovi-b4m9h0 , drovi-b4m564 , drovi-b4m599 , drovi-b4m918 , drovi-b4mb87 , drovi-b4mc71 , drovi-b4mfa4 , drowi-ACHE , drowi-b4mjb9 , drowi-b4mkt7 , drowi-b4mlc1 , drowi-b4mp68 , drowi-b4mqe9 , drowi-b4mqf0.2 , drowi-b4mqf1 , drowi-b4mqf3 , drowi-b4mqf4 , drowi-b4mqf5 , drowi-b4mqq6 , drowi-b4mrd1 , drowi-b4mrk3 , drowi-b4mtl5 , drowi-b4mug2 , drowi-b4muj8 , drowi-b4mv18 , drowi-b4mw32 , drowi-b4mw85 , drowi-b4mwp2 , drowi-b4mwp6 , drowi-b4mwq5 , drowi-b4mwr0 , drowi-b4mwr8 , drowi-b4mwr9 , drowi-b4mwt1 , drowi-b4mwz7 , drowi-b4mxn5 , drowi-b4my54 , drowi-b4myg1 , drowi-b4myh5 , drowi-b4n0d4 , drowi-b4n1a7 , drowi-b4n1c8 , drowi-b4n3s9 , drowi-b4n3x7 , drowi-b4n4x9 , drowi-b4n4y0 , drowi-b4n6m1 , drowi-b4n6n0 , drowi-b4n6n7 , drowi-b4n6u6 , drowi-b4n7s6 , drowi-b4n7s7 , drowi-b4n7s8 , drowi-b4n899.1 , drowi-b4n8a1 , drowi-b4n8a2 , drowi-b4n8a3 , drowi-b4n8a4 , drowi-b4n8a9 , drowi-b4n023 , drowi-b4n075 , drowi-b4n543 , drowi-b4n888 , drowi-b4n889 , drowi-b4n891 , drowi-b4n893 , drowi-b4n895 , drowi-b4n897 , drowi-b4n898 , drowi-b4n899.2 , drowi-b4nae3 , drowi-b4ner8 , drowi-b4ng76 , drowi-b4nga7 , drowi-b4ngb5 , drowi-b4nhz9 , drowi-b4nj18 , drowi-b4nj19 , drowi-b4nja7 , drowi-b4nja8 , drowi-b4nja9 , drowi-b4njk8 , drowi-b4nkc8 , drowi-b4nky0 , drowi-b4nl36 , drowi-b4nm27 , drowi-b4nn59 , drowi-b4nnc1 , drowi-b4nng1 , drowi-b4nng2 , droya-ACHE , droya-aes04 , droya-b4itg2 , droya-b4itg6 , droya-b4itu9 , droya-b4iuv4 , droya-b4iuv5 , droya-b4nxe6 , droya-b4nxg5 , droya-b4nxg6 , droya-b4nxg8 , droya-b4nxw4 , droya-b4ny57 , droya-b4ny58 , droya-b4ny86 , droya-b4nzz8 , droya-b4p0b5 , droya-b4p0q9 , droya-b4p0r0 , droya-b4p0r7 , droya-b4p0r8 , droya-b4p0r9 , droya-b4p0s0 , droya-b4p0s2 , droya-b4p0t0 , droya-b4p0t1 , droya-b4p3h4 , droya-b4p3x8 , droya-b4p5g8 , droya-b4p6c9 , droya-b4p6l9 , droya-b4p6r1 , droya-b4p6r2 , droya-b4p7u4 , droya-b4p8w7 , droya-b4p023 , droya-b4p241 , droya-b4p774 , droya-b4pat9 , droya-b4pbl1 , droya-b4pd22 , droya-b4pd70 , droya-b4pdm8 , droya-b4pet9 , droya-b4pff9 , droya-b4pga7 , droya-b4pgu0 , droya-b4pig3 , droya-b4pjt8 , droya-b4pka2 , droya-b4plh2 , droya-b4pma3 , droya-b4pmv3 , droya-b4pmv4 , droya-b4pmv5 , droya-b4pn92 , droya-b4pp65 , droya-b4ppc5 , droya-b4ppc6 , droya-b4ppc7 , droya-b4ppc8 , droya-b4pq03 , droya-b4prg6B , droya-b4prg9 , droya-b4prh3 , droya-b4prh4 , droya-b4prh6 , droya-b4prh7 , droya-b4psz8 , droya-b4psz9 , droya-b4pv22 , droya-b4q0g5 , droya-b4q246 , droya-EST6 , droya-q71d76 , drowi-b4n7m9 , drope-b4gkk1 , droer-b3n5s3 , drose-b4i1w5 , drowi-a0a0q9x0t3 , drogr-b4jvm7 , dromo-b4ku70 , drovi-b4mcn9 , drovi-b4lty2 , drogr-b4jdu1 , drovi-a0a0q9wiq8 , dromo-b4kf70 , drosi-b2zi86 , droya-b4p2y4 , drose-b2zic5 , droer-b3n895

Title : Efficacy of tacrolimus in treatment of polymyositis associated with myasthenia gravis - Shimojima_2004_Clin.Rheumatol_23_262
Author(s) : Shimojima Y , Gono T , Yamamoto K , Hoshi K , Matsuda M , Yoshida K , Ikeda S
Ref : Clin Rheumatol , 23 :262 , 2004
Abstract : We report a patient with polymyositis (PM) associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Both disorders had been controlled for around 15 years by oral prednisolone and a cholinesterase inhibitor following surgical removal of invasive thymoma and radiotherapy, but muscular weakness due to myalgia and an increase in serum levels of myogenic enzymes, mainly ascribable to the recurrence of PM, reappeared immediately after cessation of these drugs, which was done because the patient had multiple bone fractures and severe osteoporosis due to the long-term corticosteroid therapy. Oral tacrolimus was therefore tried, and produced an improvement in muscular symptoms in association with normalization of myogenic enzymes. PM associated with MG as in this patient might be the best indication for tacrolimus, considering its efficacy in MG, but this drug should also be actively considered as a therapeutic option in refractory cases of PM alone, particularly when either corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents are not usable.
ESTHER : Shimojima_2004_Clin.Rheumatol_23_262
PubMedSearch : Shimojima_2004_Clin.Rheumatol_23_262
PubMedID: 15168159

Title : Molecular characterization of a 313-kb genomic region containing the self-incompatibility locus of Ipomoea trifida, a diploid relative of sweet potato. -
Author(s) : Tomita RN , Suzuki G , Yoshida K , Yano Y , Tsuchiya T , Kakeda K , Mukai Y , Kowyama Y
Ref : Breed Sci , 54 :0 , 2004
PubMedID:
Gene_locus related to this paper: ipotf-q6jj33 , ipotf-q6jj42

Title : Protein region important for regulation of lipid metabolism in angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3): ANGPTL3 is cleaved and activated in vivo - Ono_2003_J.Biol.Chem_278_41804
Author(s) : Ono M , Shimizugawa T , Shimamura M , Yoshida K , Noji-Sakikawa C , Ando Y , Koishi R , Furukawa H
Ref : Journal of Biological Chemistry , 278 :41804 , 2003
Abstract : Angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) is a secreted protein that is mainly expressed in the liver and regulates lipid metabolism by inhibiting the lipolysis of triglyceriderich lipoproteins. Using deletion mutants of human ANGPTL3, we demonstrated that the N-terminal coiled-coil domain-containing fragment-(17-207) and not the C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain-containing fragment-(207-460) increased the plasma triglyceride levels in mice. We also found that the N-terminal region 17-165 was required to increase plasma triglyceride levels in mice and that a substitution of basic amino acid residues in the region 61-66 of the fragment showed no increase in the plasma triglyceride levels and no inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase. In addition, when we analyzed ANGPTL3 in human plasma, we detected cleaved fragments of ANGPTL3. By analyzing recombinant ANGPTL3 in mouse plasma, we found that it was cleaved at two sites, Arg221 downward arrow Ala222 and Arg224 downward arrow Thr225, which are located in the linker region between the coiled-coil domain and the fibrinogen-like domain. Furthermore, a cleavage-resistant mutant of ANGPTL3 was determined to be less active than wild-type ANGPTL3 in increasing mouse plasma triglyceride levels but not in inhibiting lipoprotein lipase activity. These findings suggest that the cleavage of ANGPTL3 is important for the activation of ANGPTL3 in vivo.
ESTHER : Ono_2003_J.Biol.Chem_278_41804
PubMedSearch : Ono_2003_J.Biol.Chem_278_41804
PubMedID: 12909640

Title : ANGPTL3 decreases very low density lipoprotein triglyceride clearance by inhibition of lipoprotein lipase - Shimizugawa_2002_J.Biol.Chem_277_33742
Author(s) : Shimizugawa T , Ono M , Shimamura M , Yoshida K , Ando Y , Koishi R , Ueda K , Inaba T , Minekura H , Kohama T , Furukawa H
Ref : Journal of Biological Chemistry , 277 :33742 , 2002
Abstract : KK/San is a mutant mouse strain established in our laboratory from KK obese mice. KK/San mice show low plasma lipid levels compared with wild-type KK mice despite showing signs of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Recently, we identified a mutation in the gene encoding angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3) in KK/San mice, and injection of adenoviruses encoding Angptl3 or recombinant ANGPTL3 protein to mutant KK/San mice raised plasma lipid levels. To elucidate the regulatory mechanism of ANGPTL3 on lipid metabolism, we focused on the metabolic pathways of triglyceride in the present study. Overexpression of Angptl3 in KK/San mice resulted in a marked increase of triglyceride-enriched very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). In vivo studies using Triton WR1339 revealed that there is no significant difference between mutant and wild-type KK mice in the hepatic VLDL triglyceride secretion rate. However, turnover studies using radiolabeled VLDL revealed that the clearance of (3)H-triglyceride-labeled VLDL was significantly enhanced in KK/San mice, whereas the clearance of (125)I-labeled VLDL was only slightly enhanced. In vitro analysis of recombinant protein revealed that ANGPTL3 directly inhibits LPL activity. These data strongly support the hypothesis that ANGPTL3 is a new class of lipid metabolism modulator, which regulates VLDL triglyceride levels through the inhibition of LPL activity.
ESTHER : Shimizugawa_2002_J.Biol.Chem_277_33742
PubMedSearch : Shimizugawa_2002_J.Biol.Chem_277_33742
PubMedID: 12097324

Title : Functional annotation of a full-length mouse cDNA collection - Kawai_2001_Nature_409_685
Author(s) : Kawai J , Shinagawa A , Shibata K , Yoshino M , Itoh M , Ishii Y , Arakawa T , Hara A , Fukunishi Y , Konno H , Adachi J , Fukuda S , Aizawa K , Izawa M , Nishi K , Kiyosawa H , Kondo S , Yamanaka I , Saito T , Okazaki Y , Gojobori T , Bono H , Kasukawa T , Saito R , Kadota K , Matsuda H , Ashburner M , Batalov S , Casavant T , Fleischmann W , Gaasterland T , Gissi C , King B , Kochiwa H , Kuehl P , Lewis S , Matsuo Y , Nikaido I , Pesole G , Quackenbush J , Schriml LM , Staubli F , Suzuki R , Tomita M , Wagner L , Washio T , Sakai K , Okido T , Furuno M , Aono H , Baldarelli R , Barsh G , Blake J , Boffelli D , Bojunga N , Carninci P , de Bonaldo MF , Brownstein MJ , Bult C , Fletcher C , Fujita M , Gariboldi M , Gustincich S , Hill D , Hofmann M , Hume DA , Kamiya M , Lee NH , Lyons P , Marchionni L , Mashima J , Mazzarelli J , Mombaerts P , Nordone P , Ring B , Ringwald M , Rodriguez I , Sakamoto N , Sasaki H , Sato K , Schonbach C , Seya T , Shibata Y , Storch KF , Suzuki H , Toyo-oka K , Wang KH , Weitz C , Whittaker C , Wilming L , Wynshaw-Boris A , Yoshida K , Hasegawa Y , Kawaji H , Kohtsuki S , Hayashizaki Y
Ref : Nature , 409 :685 , 2001
Abstract : The RIKEN Mouse Gene Encyclopaedia Project, a systematic approach to determining the full coding potential of the mouse genome, involves collection and sequencing of full-length complementary DNAs and physical mapping of the corresponding genes to the mouse genome. We organized an international functional annotation meeting (FANTOM) to annotate the first 21,076 cDNAs to be analysed in this project. Here we describe the first RIKEN clone collection, which is one of the largest described for any organism. Analysis of these cDNAs extends known gene families and identifies new ones.
ESTHER : Kawai_2001_Nature_409_685
PubMedSearch : Kawai_2001_Nature_409_685
PubMedID: 11217851
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-1lipg , mouse-1plip , mouse-1plrp , mouse-ABH15 , mouse-abhd5 , mouse-ABHD6 , mouse-Abhd8 , mouse-aryla , mouse-bphl , mouse-cauxin , mouse-Ces1g , mouse-CPMac , mouse-dpp8 , mouse-EPHX1 , mouse-ES10 , mouse-hslip , mouse-hyes , mouse-ABHD2 , mouse-lcat , mouse-lipli , mouse-LIPN , mouse-lypla1 , mouse-lypla2 , mouse-OVCA2 , mouse-pafa , mouse-pcp , mouse-Ppgb , mouse-PPME1 , mouse-ppt , mouse-q3uuq7 , mouse-Q9DAI6 , mouse-Q80UX8 , mouse-RISC , mouse-SERHL , mouse-SPG21 , mouse-Tex30

Title : Complete nucleotide sequence of a plant tumor-inducing Ti plasmid. -
Author(s) : Suzuki K , Hattori Y , Uraji M , Ohta N , Iwata K , Murata K , Katoh A , Yoshida K
Ref : Gene , 242 :331 , 2000
PubMedID: 10721727
Gene_locus related to this paper: agrra-TIORF87

Title : Liver scintigraphy is useful for selecting candidates for preoperative transarterial chemoembolization among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease - Nakano_1999_Am.J.Surg_178_385
Author(s) : Nakano H , Yoshida K , Takeuchi S , Kumada K , Yamaguchi M , Jaeck D
Ref : American Journal of Surgery , 178 :385 , 1999
Abstract : BACKGROUND The indications for preoperative hepatic transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) have not been clarified by recent studies in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated by chronic liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate which patients benefit most from preoperative TACE on the basis of hepatic functional reserve. Technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin (Tc-GSA) liver scintigraphy was used to assess hepatic functional reserve before and after TACE. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Liver scintigraphy was performed before and several weeks after TACE in 64 patients with HCC complicated by chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. The ratio of liver to heart-plus-liver radioactivity of Tc-GSA 15 minutes after injection (LHL15) was calculated. Conventional hepatic functional tests were also performed. Whether to perform hepatectomy after TACE was decided mainly on the basis of the previously reported value of LHL15 > or =0.91. RESULTS: LHL15, prothrombin time, and serum concentration of cholinesterase significantly decreased after TACE in patients with LHL15 > or =20.91 (P <0.01, P <0.05, and P <0.05, respectively). In patients with LHL15 <0.91, LHL15 and functional liver volume significantly increased after TACE (both P <0.05). Eight patients with LHL15 > or =0.91 did not undergo hepatectomy because LHL15 decreased to less than 0.91 after TACE, whereas 7 patients with LHL15 <0.91 underwent hepatectomy because LHL15 increased to more than 0.91 after TACE. Three major postoperative complications occurred in patients with LHL15 > or =0.91, and no major complications occurred in patients with LHL15 <0.91.
CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that preoperative TACE should be performed in HCC patients only when LHL15 is less than 0.91, and that preoperative TACE is not an appropriate treatment for patients with LHL15 > or =0.91 when HCC is resectable.
ESTHER : Nakano_1999_Am.J.Surg_178_385
PubMedSearch : Nakano_1999_Am.J.Surg_178_385
PubMedID: 10612533

Title : Novel structural difference between nopaline- and octopine-type trbJ genes: construction of genetic and physical map and sequencing of trb\/traI and rep gene clusters of a new Ti plasmid pTi-SAKURA - Suzuki_1998_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1396_1
Author(s) : Suzuki K , Ohta N , Hattori Y , Uraji M , Kato A , Yoshida K
Ref : Biochimica & Biophysica Acta , 1396 :1 , 1998
Abstract : We constructed a gene library of a nopaline-type Ti plasmid (called pTi-SAKURA) which was newly isolated from Agrobacterium tumefaciens MAFF301001 of a Japanese cherry tree. The partial sequencing data, which were distributed over the entire plasmid genome, made it possible to assign typical Ti-encoded genes including trb and rep gene clusters. The trb/traI and rep gene clusters were sequenced completely. All the genes in the regions except trbJ were homologous with the corresponding genes on octopine-type Ti plasmids, based on both ORF size and sequence similarity. The trbJ on pTi-SAKURA is similar to that of an octopine-type Ti, but has an extra 282-base segment in its central domain. The above gene organization and sequences suggest a divergence of Ti plasmid during evolution in relation to Rhizobium plasmids, and is discussed in this paper.
ESTHER : Suzuki_1998_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1396_1
PubMedSearch : Suzuki_1998_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1396_1
PubMedID: 9524202
Gene_locus related to this paper: agrra-TIORF87

Title : Genome structure of pTi-SAKURA (II): genetic map constructed by complete DNA sequencing - Suzuki_1997_Nucleic.Acids.Symp.Ser_37_161
Author(s) : Suzuki K , Hattori Y , Uraji M , Ohta N , Katoh A , Yoshida K
Ref : Nucleic Acids Symp Ser , 37 :161 , 1997
Abstract : Ti plasmid (pTi-SAKURA) DNA isolated from an agrobacterium pathogenic against Japanese cherry trees were completely sequenced by primer walking with PCR subcloning. Typical genes including transfer DNA (T-DNA), nopaline utilizing genes, trb genes, traI, rep genes, tra genes, acc and vir genes were assigned in this order to pTi-SAKURA. Between the rep genes and tra genes, we found a large region which essentially lacks homology to any sequences in DNA databases. By amino acid sequence search, we could pick up several ORFs which are homologous with genes putatively capable to enhance interaction between agrobacteria and plants.
ESTHER : Suzuki_1997_Nucleic.Acids.Symp.Ser_37_161
PubMedSearch : Suzuki_1997_Nucleic.Acids.Symp.Ser_37_161
PubMedID: 9586049

Title : Genome structure of pTi-SAKURA (I): strategy for DNA sequencing of a Japanese cherry-Ti plasmid - Hattori_1997_Nucleic.Acids.Symp.Ser_37_159
Author(s) : Hattori Y , Suzuki K , Uraji M , Ohta N , Katoh A , Yoshida K
Ref : Nucleic Acids Symp Ser , 37 :159 , 1997
Abstract : We isolated a plasmid from a bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which had been found in a crown gall tumor on a Japanese cherry tree SAKURA and designated it pTi-SAKURA. For complete DNA sequencing, we constructed a DNA library in lambda phage vector and developed a sequencing method by primer walking with long PCR and a PCR subcloning technique for long insert DNA.
ESTHER : Hattori_1997_Nucleic.Acids.Symp.Ser_37_159
PubMedSearch : Hattori_1997_Nucleic.Acids.Symp.Ser_37_159
PubMedID: 9586048
Gene_locus related to this paper: agrra-TIORF87

Title : The complete genome sequence of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis - Kunst_1997_Nature_390_249
Author(s) : Kunst F , Ogasawara N , Moszer I , Albertini AM , Alloni G , Azevedo V , Bertero MG , Bessieres P , Bolotin A , Borchert S , Borriss R , Boursier L , Brans A , Braun M , Brignell SC , Bron S , Brouillet S , Bruschi CV , Caldwell B , Capuano V , Carter NM , Choi SK , Cordani JJ , Connerton IF , Cummings NJ , Daniel RA , Denziot F , Devine KM , Dusterhoft A , Ehrlich SD , Emmerson PT , Entian KD , Errington J , Fabret C , Ferrari E , Foulger D , Fritz C , Fujita M , Fujita Y , Fuma S , Galizzi A , Galleron N , Ghim SY , Glaser P , Goffeau A , Golightly EJ , Grandi G , Guiseppi G , Guy BJ , Haga K , Haiech J , Harwood CR , Henaut A , Hilbert H , Holsappel S , Hosono S , Hullo MF , Itaya M , Jones L , Joris B , Karamata D , Kasahara Y , Klaerr-Blanchard M , Klein C , Kobayashi Y , Koetter P , Koningstein G , Krogh S , Kumano M , Kurita K , Lapidus A , Lardinois S , Lauber J , Lazarevic V , Lee SM , Levine A , Liu H , Masuda S , Mauel C , Medigue C , Medina N , Mellado RP , Mizuno M , Moestl D , Nakai S , Noback M , Noone D , O'Reilly M , Ogawa K , Ogiwara A , Oudega B , Park SH , Parro V , Pohl TM , Portelle D , Porwollik S , Prescott AM , Presecan E , Pujic P , Purnelle B , Rapoport G , Rey M , Reynolds S , Rieger M , Rivolta C , Rocha E , Roche B , Rose M , Sadaie Y , Sato T , Scanlan E , Schleich S , Schroeter R , Scoffone F , Sekiguchi J , Sekowska A , Seror SJ , Serror P , Shin BS , Soldo B , Sorokin A , Tacconi E , Takagi T , Takahashi H , Takemaru K , Takeuchi M , Tamakoshi A , Tanaka T , Terpstra P , Togoni A , Tosato V , Uchiyama S , Vandebol M , Vannier F , Vassarotti A , Viari A , Wambutt R , Wedler H , Weitzenegger T , Winters P , Wipat A , Yamamoto H , Yamane K , Yasumoto K , Yata K , Yoshida K , Yoshikawa HF , Zumstein E , Yoshikawa H , Danchin A
Ref : Nature , 390 :249 , 1997
Abstract : Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large proportion of the genetic capacity is devoted to the utilization of a variety of carbon sources, including many plant-derived molecules. The identification of five signal peptidase genes, as well as several genes for components of the secretion apparatus, is important given the capacity of Bacillus strains to secrete large amounts of industrially important enzymes. Many of the genes are involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, that are more typically associated with Streptomyces species. The genome contains at least ten prophages or remnants of prophages, indicating that bacteriophage infection has played an important evolutionary role in horizontal gene transfer, in particular in the propagation of bacterial pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Kunst_1997_Nature_390_249
PubMedSearch : Kunst_1997_Nature_390_249
PubMedID: 9384377
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacsu-CAH , bacsu-cbxnp , bacsu-lip , bacsu-LIPB , bacsu-PKSR , bacsu-pnbae , bacsu-PPSE , bacsu-srf4 , bacsu-srfac , bacsu-YBAC , bacsu-YBDG , bacsu-ybfk , bacsu-ycgS , bacsu-yczh , bacsu-YDEN , bacsu-ydjp , bacsu-yfhM , bacsu-yisY , bacsu-YITV , bacsu-yjau , bacsu-YJCH , bacsu-MHQD , bacsu-yqjl , bacsu-yqkd , bacsu-YRAK , bacsu-YTAP , bacsu-YTMA , bacsu-YTPA , bacsu-ytxm , bacsu-yugF , bacsu-YUII , bacsu-YUKL , bacsu-YVAK , bacsu-YvaM , bacsu-RsbQ

Title : Colocalization of acetylcholinesterase and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) positive neurons in the intralingual ganglia and perivascular nerve fibers around lingual arteries in the porcine, monkey and canine tongue - Yoshida_1997_Neurosci.Lett_222_147
Author(s) : Yoshida K , Toda N
Ref : Neuroscience Letters , 222 :147 , 1997
Abstract : Distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the intrinsic ganglia in the porcine, monkey and canine tongue was histologically investigated using the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) method, acetylcholinesterase histochemistry and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunohistochemistry. The majority of intralingual ganglionic cells showed intense NADPH-d reactivity with positive acetylcholinesterase reaction or positive VIP immunohistochemistry. The NADPH-d positive, acetylcholinesterase-rich and the NADPH-d positive, VIP immunoreactive nerve fibers are particularly conspicuous around intralingual blood vessels. These fibers around the arteries in the tongue may be partly derived from the intralingual ganglion cells, because some bundles associated with these nerve cells were easily traced on the wall of blood vessels. The present study suggests the view that the three markers coexist in the axons and nerve terminals of these intralingual neurons.
ESTHER : Yoshida_1997_Neurosci.Lett_222_147
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_1997_Neurosci.Lett_222_147
PubMedID: 9148236

Title : NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the intracardiac plexus of human, monkey and canine right atria - Yoshida_1996_Brain.Res_724_256
Author(s) : Yoshida K , Toda N
Ref : Brain Research , 724 :256 , 1996
Abstract : Distribution of nitric oxide synthase in intracardiac ganglion cells located in human, monkey and canine right atria was histologically investigated using the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase method and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry. In the intracardiac ganglion, many large neurons exhibited both positive reactions, whereas some of the NADPH diaphorase-positive small neuronal cells were shown with negative acetylcholinesterase reaction.
ESTHER : Yoshida_1996_Brain.Res_724_256
PubMedSearch : Yoshida_1996_Brain.Res_724_256
PubMedID: 8828577