Tu ZJ

References (5)

Title : Genome Assembly of the Fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus, and Transcriptome Analysis during Early Stages of Infection on American Wildrice (Zizania palustris L.) - Castell-Miller_2016_PLoS.One_11_e0154122
Author(s) : Castell-Miller CV , Gutierrez-Gonzalez JJ , Tu ZJ , Bushley KE , Hainaut M , Henrissat B , Samac DA
Ref : PLoS ONE , 11 :e0154122 , 2016
Abstract : The fungus Cochliobolus miyabeanus causes severe leaf spot disease on rice (Oryza sativa) and two North American specialty crops, American wildrice (Zizania palustris) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Despite the importance of C. miyabeanus as a disease-causing agent in wildrice, little is known about either the mechanisms of pathogenicity or host defense responses. To start bridging these gaps, the genome of C. miyabeanus strain TG12bL2 was shotgun sequenced using Illumina technology. The genome assembly consists of 31.79 Mbp in 2,378 scaffolds with an N50 = 74,921. It contains 11,000 predicted genes of which 94.5% were annotated. Approximately 10% of total gene number is expected to be secreted. The C. miyabeanus genome is rich in carbohydrate active enzymes, and harbors 187 small secreted peptides (SSPs) and some fungal effector homologs. Detoxification systems were represented by a variety of enzymes that could offer protection against plant defense compounds. The non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases (PKS) present were common to other Cochliobolus species. Additionally, the fungal transcriptome was analyzed at 48 hours after inoculation in planta. A total of 10,674 genes were found to be expressed, some of which are known to be involved in pathogenicity or response to host defenses including hydrophobins, cutinase, cell wall degrading enzymes, enzymes related to reactive oxygen species scavenging, PKS, detoxification systems, SSPs, and a known fungal effector. This work will facilitate future research on C. miyabeanus pathogen-associated molecular patterns and effectors, and in the identification of their corresponding wildrice defense mechanisms.
ESTHER : Castell-Miller_2016_PLoS.One_11_e0154122
PubMedSearch : Castell-Miller_2016_PLoS.One_11_e0154122
PubMedID: 27253872

Title : Genome sequence of the Asian Tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, reveals insights into its biology, genetics, and evolution - Chen_2015_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_112_E5907
Author(s) : Chen XG , Jiang X , Gu J , Xu M , Wu Y , Deng Y , Zhang C , Bonizzoni M , Dermauw W , Vontas J , Armbruster P , Huang X , Yang Y , Zhang H , He W , Peng H , Liu Y , Wu K , Chen J , Lirakis M , Topalis P , Van Leeuwen T , Hall AB , Thorpe C , Mueller RL , Sun C , Waterhouse RM , Yan G , Tu ZJ , Fang X , James AA
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 112 :E5907 , 2015
Abstract : The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly successful invasive species that transmits a number of human viral diseases, including dengue and Chikungunya fevers. This species has a large genome with significant population-based size variation. The complete genome sequence was determined for the Foshan strain, an established laboratory colony derived from wild mosquitoes from southeastern China, a region within the historical range of the origin of the species. The genome comprises 1,967 Mb, the largest mosquito genome sequenced to date, and its size results principally from an abundance of repetitive DNA classes. In addition, expansions of the numbers of members in gene families involved in insecticide-resistance mechanisms, diapause, sex determination, immunity, and olfaction also contribute to the larger size. Portions of integrated flavivirus-like genomes support a shared evolutionary history of association of these viruses with their vector. The large genome repertory may contribute to the adaptability and success of Ae. albopictus as an invasive species.
ESTHER : Chen_2015_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_112_E5907
PubMedSearch : Chen_2015_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_112_E5907
PubMedID: 26483478
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-q177c7 , aedal-a0a182gwe3 , aedal-a0a182gwt8 , aedal-a0a023eq67

Title : Comparative genome structure, secondary metabolite, and effector coding capacity across Cochliobolus pathogens - Condon_2013_PLoS.Genet_9_e1003233
Author(s) : Condon BJ , Leng Y , Wu D , Bushley KE , Ohm RA , Otillar R , Martin J , Schackwitz W , Grimwood J , MohdZainudin N , Xue C , Wang R , Manning VA , Dhillon B , Tu ZJ , Steffenson BJ , Salamov A , Sun H , Lowry S , LaButti K , Han J , Copeland A , Lindquist E , Barry K , Schmutz J , Baker SE , Ciuffetti LM , Grigoriev IV , Zhong S , Turgeon BG
Ref : PLoS Genet , 9 :e1003233 , 2013
Abstract : The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five percent of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25x higher than those between inbred lines and 50x lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP-encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.
ESTHER : Condon_2013_PLoS.Genet_9_e1003233
PubMedSearch : Condon_2013_PLoS.Genet_9_e1003233
PubMedID: 23357949
Gene_locus related to this paper: cocsn-m2rnc6 , coch5-m2tnl8 , coch4-n4xap8 , sett2-r0j560 , cocsn-m2thl9 , coch5-m2v1s2 , coch4-n4xzy1 , cocsn-m2sqr3 , cocsn-m2rnk8 , coch4-n4xdv7 , coch5-m2uds0 , coch5-m2um94 , sett2-r0i8c5 , coch4-n4wlc8 , coch4-n4x9p3 , cocsn-m2rh47 , cocsn-m2qz08 , sett2-r0jqq6 , sett2-r0imb6 , coch4-n4x7u3 , cocsn-m2rv02 , cocsn-m2sy95 , coch5-m2ubd5 , cocsn-m2t3d2 , sett2-r0kl84 , sett2-r0jts7 , coch4-n4x2h3 , sett2-r0jxt9 , coch4-n4x7r9 , cocsn-m2sh75 , cocsn-m2t5z2 , coch5-m2ucf6 , sett2-r0k664 , cocsn-m2t3q1 , sett2-r0k4b4 , cocsn-m2t4i1 , coch5-m2th93 , cocsn-m2svm8 , cocsn-m2s6q4 , cocsn-m2s5h5 , coch4-n4xf94 , sett2-r0kdl8 , cocsn-m2qvi9 , sett2-r0kfg6 , cocsn-m2szq4 , sett2-r0j437 , coch4-n4x7j4 , coch5-m2twk3 , coch5-m2usf2 , sett2-r0kjt7 , sett2-r0k7y2 , cocsn-m2th03 , sett2-r0iy92 , sett2-r0kbr9 , sett2-r0k997 , coch5-m2sik6 , sett2-r0jzj5 , cocsn-m2r0j6 , coch4-n4x6a4 , cocsn-m2s7a5 , cocsn-m2sv79 , sett2-r0knx4 , sett2-r0ksh8 , sett2-r0ip86 , cocmi-w6yyy3 , cocsn-m2sqe4 , coch4-n4xzc8 , cocvi-w7eyp1 , cocmi-w6zf65 , cocvi-w7er28 , cocca-w6yw25 , cocvi-w7e2g6 , cocmi-w6z7k5 , cocca-w6ys73 , cocca-w6ydq2 , cocca-w6y7i5 , cocmi-w6yyr0 , cocca-w6yh47 , cocmi-w6zju4 , cocca-w6ynq5 , cocmi-w6zm44 , cocca-w6xx85 , cocmi-w6z011 , cocca-w6yre4 , cocmi-w6z9l3 , cocca-w6yfp7 , cocmi-w6zlc2 , cocca-w6yar2 , cocmi-w6yjr7 , cocca-w6yhs1 , cocca-w6xux8 , cocmi-w6z9s8 , cocca-w6yq27 , cocmi-w6zqk9 , cocca-w6xq19 , cocca-w6y1r6 , cocca-w6ygj2 , cocmi-w6zgn4 , cocca-w6ybh2 , cocmi-w6z710 , cocca-w6yk86 , cocmi-w6zjz2 , cocmi-w6z7f2 , cocca-w6xn57 , cocca-w6ybq4 , cocmi-w6yxn5 , cocmi-w6zf08 , cocsn-m2rtg8 , cocmi-w6zuj7 , cocca-w6xtb2 , cocca-w6yk97 , coch5-m2t2x3 , cocmi-w6z646 , cocsn-m2sze4 , sett2-r0kjg6 , cocmi-w6yrn5 , sett2-r0k5q0 , cocvi-w7ezb7 , sett2-r0jtm1 , cocmi-w6ywa1 , cocsn-m2t3e8 , coch5-m2ulw5 , coch5-m2urw9 , sett2-r0knn5 , cocmi-w6ysb2 , cocvi-w7eag7 , cocca-w6y1v2 , sett2-r0i9k2 , coch5-m2uul8 , cocsn-m2sl21

Title : Multi-platform next-generation sequencing of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo): genome assembly and analysis - Dalloul_2010_PLoS.Biol_8_E1000475
Author(s) : Dalloul RA , Long JA , Zimin AV , Aslam L , Beal K , Blomberg Le A , Bouffard P , Burt DW , Crasta O , Crooijmans RP , Cooper K , Coulombe RA , De S , Delany ME , Dodgson JB , Dong JJ , Evans C , Frederickson KM , Flicek P , Florea L , Folkerts O , Groenen MA , Harkins TT , Herrero J , Hoffmann S , Megens HJ , Jiang A , de Jong P , Kaiser P , Kim H , Kim KW , Kim S , Langenberger D , Lee MK , Lee T , Mane S , Marcais G , Marz M , McElroy AP , Modise T , Nefedov M , Notredame C , Paton IR , Payne WS , Pertea G , Prickett D , Puiu D , Qioa D , Raineri E , Ruffier M , Salzberg SL , Schatz MC , Scheuring C , Schmidt CJ , Schroeder S , Searle SM , Smith EJ , Smith J , Sonstegard TS , Stadler PF , Tafer H , Tu ZJ , Van Tassell CP , Vilella AJ , Williams KP , Yorke JA , Zhang L , Zhang HB , Zhang X , Zhang Y , Reed KM
Ref : PLoS Biol , 8 : , 2010
Abstract : A synergistic combination of two next-generation sequencing platforms with a detailed comparative BAC physical contig map provided a cost-effective assembly of the genome sequence of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Heterozygosity of the sequenced source genome allowed discovery of more than 600,000 high quality single nucleotide variants. Despite this heterozygosity, the current genome assembly ( approximately 1.1 Gb) includes 917 Mb of sequence assigned to specific turkey chromosomes. Annotation identified nearly 16,000 genes, with 15,093 recognized as protein coding and 611 as non-coding RNA genes. Comparative analysis of the turkey, chicken, and zebra finch genomes, and comparing avian to mammalian species, supports the characteristic stability of avian genomes and identifies genes unique to the avian lineage. Clear differences are seen in number and variety of genes of the avian immune system where expansions and novel genes are less frequent than examples of gene loss. The turkey genome sequence provides resources to further understand the evolution of vertebrate genomes and genetic variation underlying economically important quantitative traits in poultry. This integrated approach may be a model for providing both gene and chromosome level assemblies of other species with agricultural, ecological, and evolutionary interest.
ESTHER : Dalloul_2010_PLoS.Biol_8_E1000475
PubMedSearch : Dalloul_2010_PLoS.Biol_8_E1000475
PubMedID: 20838655
Gene_locus related to this paper: melga-g1mv74 , melga-g1myh1 , melga-g1n3b6 , melga-g1n4i8 , melga-g1n8a7 , melga-g1nb53 , melga-g1ndd8 , melga-g1npu5 , melga-g3ur65 , melga-g3uur6 , melga-g1njn8 , melga-g1mrp7 , melga-g1mzw6 , melga-g1n2a7 , melga-g1n608 , melga-g1n2j6 , melga-g1n2k0 , melga-g1ncb6 , melga-g1nei5 , melga-g1n1j3 , melga-g1nfd3 , melga-g1nna9 , melga-h9h0c1 , melga-g1nnl1 , melga-g1nhb9 , melga-g1mtl7 , fical-u3jnn0 , melga-g1n332 , melga-g1mtx9 , melga-g1nns1

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49