Eiglmeier K

References (11)

Title : Anopheles ecology, genetics and malaria transmission in northern Cambodia - Vantaux_2021_Sci.Rep_11_6458
Author(s) : Vantaux A , Riehle MM , Piv E , Farley EJ , Chy S , Kim S , Corbett AG , Fehrman RL , Pepey A , Eiglmeier K , Lek D , Siv S , Mueller I , Vernick KD , Witkowski B
Ref : Sci Rep , 11 :6458 , 2021
Abstract : In the Greater Mekong Subregion, malaria cases have significantly decreased but little is known about the vectors or mechanisms responsible for residual malaria transmission. We analysed a total of 3920 Anopheles mosquitoes collected during the rainy and dry seasons from four ecological settings in Cambodia (villages, forested areas near villages, rubber tree plantations and forest sites). Using odor-baited traps, 81% of the total samples across all sites were collected in cow baited traps, although 67% of the samples attracted by human baited traps were collected in forest sites. Overall, 20% of collected Anopheles were active during the day, with increased day biting during the dry season. 3131 samples were identified morphologically as 14 different species, and a subset was also identified by DNA amplicon sequencing allowing determination of 29 Anopheles species. The investigation of well characterized insecticide mutations (ace-1, kdr, and rdl genes) indicated that individuals carried mutations associated with response to all the different classes of insecticides. There also appeared to be a non-random association between mosquito species and insecticide resistance with Anopheles peditaeniatus exhibiting nearly fixed mutations. Molecular screening for Plasmodium sp. presence indicated that 3.6% of collected Anopheles were positive, most for P. vivax followed by P. falciparum. These results highlight some of the key mechanisms driving residual human malaria transmission in Cambodia, and illustrate the importance of diverse collection methods, sites and seasons to avoid bias and better characterize Anopheles mosquito ecology in Southeast Asia.
ESTHER : Vantaux_2021_Sci.Rep_11_6458
PubMedSearch : Vantaux_2021_Sci.Rep_11_6458
PubMedID: 33742030

Title : Genome analysis of a major urban malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi - Jiang_2014_Genome.Biol_15_459
Author(s) : Jiang X , Peery A , Hall AB , Sharma A , Chen XG , Waterhouse RM , Komissarov A , Riehle MM , Shouche Y , Sharakhova MV , Lawson D , Pakpour N , Arensburger P , Davidson VL , Eiglmeier K , Emrich S , George P , Kennedy RC , Mane SP , Maslen G , Oringanje C , Qi Y , Settlage R , Tojo M , Tubio JM , Unger MF , Wang B , Vernick KD , Ribeiro JM , James AA , Michel K , Riehle MA , Luckhart S , Sharakhov IV , Tu Z
Ref : Genome Biol , 15 :459 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Anopheles stephensi is the key vector of malaria throughout the Indian subcontinent and Middle East and an emerging model for molecular and genetic studies of mosquito-parasite interactions. The type form of the species is responsible for the majority of urban malaria transmission across its range.
RESULTS: Here, we report the genome sequence and annotation of the Indian strain of the type form of An. stephensi. The 221 Mb genome assembly represents more than 92% of the entire genome and was produced using a combination of 454, Illumina, and PacBio sequencing. Physical mapping assigned 62% of the genome onto chromosomes, enabling chromosome-based analysis. Comparisons between An. stephensi and An. gambiae reveal that the rate of gene order reshuffling on the X chromosome was three times higher than that on the autosomes. An. stephensi has more heterochromatin in pericentric regions but less repetitive DNA in chromosome arms than An. gambiae. We also identify a number of Y-chromosome contigs and BACs. Interspersed repeats constitute 7.1% of the assembled genome while LTR retrotransposons alone comprise more than 49% of the Y contigs. RNA-seq analyses provide new insights into mosquito innate immunity, development, and sexual dimorphism.
CONCLUSIONS: The genome analysis described in this manuscript provides a resource and platform for fundamental and translational research into a major urban malaria vector. Chromosome-based investigations provide unique perspectives on Anopheles chromosome evolution. RNA-seq analysis and studies of immunity genes offer new insights into mosquito biology and mosquito-parasite interactions.
ESTHER : Jiang_2014_Genome.Biol_15_459
PubMedSearch : Jiang_2014_Genome.Biol_15_459
PubMedID: 25244985
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-Q7PVF9 , anoga-q7q837 , anost-a0a1a9thh9 , anost-a0a182xxz0 , anost-a0a182xzf1 , anost-a0a182xxy9 , anoga-q7q887

Title : Genome plasticity of BCG and impact on vaccine efficacy - Brosch_2007_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_104_5596
Author(s) : Brosch R , Gordon SV , Garnier T , Eiglmeier K , Frigui W , Valenti P , Dos Santos S , Duthoy S , Lacroix C , Garcia-Pelayo C , Inwald JK , Golby P , Garcia JN , Hewinson RG , Behr MA , Quail MA , Churcher C , Barrell BG , Parkhill J , Cole ST
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 104 :5596 , 2007
Abstract : To understand the evolution, attenuation, and variable protective efficacy of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccines, Mycobacterium bovis BCG Pasteur 1173P2 has been subjected to comparative genome and transcriptome analysis. The 4,374,522-bp genome contains 3,954 protein-coding genes, 58 of which are present in two copies as a result of two independent tandem duplications, DU1 and DU2. DU1 is restricted to BCG Pasteur, although four forms of DU2 exist; DU2-I is confined to early BCG vaccines, like BCG Japan, whereas DU2-III and DU2-IV occur in the late vaccines. The glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, glpD2, is one of only three genes common to all four DU2 variants, implying that BCG requires higher levels of this enzyme to grow on glycerol. Further amplification of the DU2 region is ongoing, even within vaccine preparations used to immunize humans. An evolutionary scheme for BCG vaccines was established by analyzing DU2 and other markers. Lesions in genes encoding sigma-factors and pleiotropic transcriptional regulators, like PhoR and Crp, were also uncovered in various BCG strains; together with gene amplification, these affect gene expression levels, immunogenicity, and, possibly, protection against tuberculosis. Furthermore, the combined findings suggest that early BCG vaccines may even be superior to the later ones that are more widely used.
ESTHER : Brosch_2007_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_104_5596
PubMedSearch : Brosch_2007_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_104_5596
PubMedID: 17372194
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-cut3 , myctu-cutas2 , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-lipJ , myctu-LIPS , myctu-lipv , myctu-LPQC , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT1628 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-RV3473C , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49

Title : Comparative analysis of BAC and whole genome shotgun sequences from an Anopheles gambiae region related to Plasmodium encapsulation - Eiglmeier_2005_Insect.Biochem.Mol.Biol_35_799
Author(s) : Eiglmeier K , Wincker P , Cattolico L , Anthouard V , Holm I , Eckenberg R , Quesneville H , Jaillon O , Collins FH , Weissenbach J , Brey PT , Roth CW
Ref : Insect Biochemistry & Molecular Biology , 35 :799 , 2005
Abstract : The only natural mechanism of malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa is the mosquito, generally Anopheles gambiae. Blocking malaria parasite transmission by stopping the development of Plasmodium in the insect vector would provide a useful alternative to the current methods of malaria control. Toward this end, it is important to understand the molecular basis of the malaria parasite refractory phenotype in An. gambiae mosquito strains. We have selected and sequenced six bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the Pen-1 region that is the major quantitative trait locus involved in Plasmodium encapsulation. The sequence and the annotation of five overlapping BAC clones plus one adjacent, but not contiguous clone, totaling 585kb of genomic sequence from the centromeric end of the Pen-1 region of the PEST strain were compared to that of the genome sequence of the same strain produced by the whole genome shotgun technique. This project identified 23 putative mosquito genes plus putative copies of the retrotransposable elements BEL12 and TRANSIBN1_AG in the six BAC clones. Nineteen of the predicted genes are most similar to their Drosophila melanogaster homologs while one is more closely related to vertebrate genes. Comparison of these new BAC sequences plus previously published BAC sequences to the cognate region of the assembled genome sequence identified three retrotransposons present in one sequence version but not the other. One of these elements, Indy, has not been previously described. These observations provide evidence for the recent active transposition of these elements and demonstrate the plasticity of the Anopheles genome. The BAC sequences strongly support the public whole genome shotgun assembly and automatic annotation while also demonstrating the benefit of complementary genome sequences and of human curation. Importantly, the data demonstrate the differences in the genome sequence of an individual mosquito compared to that of a hypothetical, average genome sequence generated by whole genome shotgun assembly.
ESTHER : Eiglmeier_2005_Insect.Biochem.Mol.Biol_35_799
PubMedSearch : Eiglmeier_2005_Insect.Biochem.Mol.Biol_35_799
PubMedID: 15944077
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-agCG50851 , anoga-ebiG8504

Title : The complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis - Garnier_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_7877
Author(s) : Garnier T , Eiglmeier K , Camus JC , Medina N , Mansoor H , Pryor M , Duthoy S , Grondin S , Lacroix C , Monsempe C , Simon S , Harris B , Atkin R , Doggett J , Mayes R , Keating L , Wheeler PR , Parkhill J , Barrell BG , Cole ST , Gordon SV , Hewinson RG
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 100 :7877 , 2003
Abstract : Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in a range of animal species and man, with worldwide annual losses to agriculture of $3 billion. The human burden of tuberculosis caused by the bovine tubercle bacillus is still largely unknown. M. bovis was also the progenitor for the M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine strain, the most widely used human vaccine. Here we describe the 4,345,492-bp genome sequence of M. bovis AF2122/97 and its comparison with the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Strikingly, the genome sequence of M. bovis is >99.95% identical to that of M. tuberculosis, but deletion of genetic information has led to a reduced genome size. Comparison with M. leprae reveals a number of common gene losses, suggesting the removal of functional redundancy. Cell wall components and secreted proteins show the greatest variation, indicating their potential role in host-bacillus interactions or immune evasion. Furthermore, there are no genes unique to M. bovis, implying that differential gene expression may be the key to the host tropisms of human and bovine bacilli. The genome sequence therefore offers major insight on the evolution, host preference, and pathobiology of M. bovis.
ESTHER : Garnier_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_7877
PubMedSearch : Garnier_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_7877
PubMedID: 12788972
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-cut3 , myctu-cutas1 , myctu-cutas2 , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-lipJ , myctu-LIPS , myctu-lipv , myctu-LPQC , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT1628 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-RV3473C , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus - Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
Author(s) : Cole ST , Eiglmeier K , Parkhill J , James KD , Thomson NR , Wheeler PR , Honore N , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Mungall K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies RM , Devlin K , Duthoy S , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Lacroix C , Maclean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Rutter S , Seeger K , Simon S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 409 :1007 , 2001
Abstract : Leprosy, a chronic human neurological disease, results from infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae, a close relative of the tubercle bacillus. Mycobacterium leprae has the longest doubling time of all known bacteria and has thwarted every effort at culture in the laboratory. Comparing the 3.27-megabase (Mb) genome sequence of an armadillo-derived Indian isolate of the leprosy bacillus with that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.41 Mb) provides clear explanations for these properties and reveals an extreme case of reductive evolution. Less than half of the genome contains functional genes but pseudogenes, with intact counterparts in M. tuberculosis, abound. Genome downsizing and the current mosaic arrangement appear to have resulted from extensive recombination events between dispersed repetitive sequences. Gene deletion and decay have eliminated many important metabolic activities including siderophore production, part of the oxidative and most of the microaerophilic and anaerobic respiratory chains, and numerous catabolic systems and their regulatory circuits.
ESTHER : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedSearch : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedID: 11234002
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-a85a , mycle-a85b , mycle-a85c , mycle-lipG , mycle-LPQC , mycle-metx , mycle-ML0314 , mycle-ML0370 , mycle-ML0376 , mycle-ML1339 , mycle-ML1444 , mycle-ML1632 , mycle-ML1633 , mycle-ML1921 , mycle-ML2269 , mycle-ML2297 , mycle-ML2359 , mycle-ML2603 , mycle-mpt5 , mycle-PKS13 , mycle-PTRB , mycle-q9cc62 , mycle-q9cdb3

Title : Identification of variable regions in the genomes of tubercle bacilli using bacterial artificial chromosome arrays - Gordon_1999_Mol.Microbiol_32_643
Author(s) : Gordon SV , Brosch R , Billault A , Garnier T , Eiglmeier K , Cole ST
Ref : Molecular Microbiology , 32 :643 , 1999
Abstract : Whole-genome comparisons of the tubercle bacilli were undertaken using ordered bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Pasteur, together with the complete genome sequence of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Restriction-digested BAC arrays of M. tuberculosis H37Rv were used in hybridization experiments with radiolabelled M. bovis BCG genomic DNA to reveal the presence of 10 deletions (RD1-RD10) relative to M. tuberculosis. Seven of these regions, RD4-RD10, were also found to be deleted from M. bovis, with the three M. bovis BCG-specific deletions being identical to the RD1-RD3 loci described previously. The distribution of RD4-RD10 in Mycobacterium africanum resembles that of M. tuberculosis more closely than that of M. bovis, whereas an intermediate arrangement was found in Mycobacterium microti, suggesting that the corresponding genes may affect host range and virulence of the various tubercle bacilli. Among the known products encoded by these loci are a copy of the proposed mycobacterial invasin Mce, three phospholipases, several PE, PPE and ESAT-6 proteins, epoxide hydrolase and an insertion sequence. In a complementary approach, direct comparison of BACs uncovered a third class of deletions consisting of two M. tuberculosis H37Rv loci, RvD1 and RvD2, deleted from the genome relative to M. bovis BCG and M. bovis. These deletions affect a further seven genes, including a fourth phospholipase, plcD. In summary, the insertions and deletions described here have important implications for our understanding of the evolution of the tubercle complex.
ESTHER : Gordon_1999_Mol.Microbiol_32_643
PubMedSearch : Gordon_1999_Mol.Microbiol_32_643
PubMedID: 10320585
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-RV1758

Title : Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence - Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
Author(s) : Cole ST , Brosch R , Parkhill J , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Gordon SV , Eiglmeier K , Gas S , Barry CE, 3rd , Tekaia F , Badcock K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies R , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Krogh A , McLean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Osborne J , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Rutter S , Seeger K , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 393 :537 , 1998
Abstract : Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,529 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. M. tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation.
ESTHER : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedSearch : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedID: 9634230
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-cut3 , myctu-cutas1 , myctu-cutas2 , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-lipJ , myctu-LIPS , myctu-lipv , myctu-LPQC , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT1628 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-RV3473C , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : An integrated map of the genome of the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and comparison with Mycobacterium leprae - Philipp_1996_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_93_3132
Author(s) : Philipp WJ , Poulet S , Eiglmeier K , Pascopella L , Balasubramanian V , Heym B , Bergh S , Bloom BR , Jacobs WR, Jr. , Cole ST
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 93 :3132 , 1996
Abstract : An integrated map of the genome of the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was constructed by using a twin-pronged approach. Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic analysis enabled cleavage sites for Asn I and Dra I to be positioned on the 4.4-Mb circular chromosome, while, in parallel, clones from two cosmid libraries were ordered into contigs by means of fingerprinting and hybridization mapping. The resultant contig map was readily correlated with the physical map of the genome via the landmarked restriction sites. Over 165 genes and markers were localized on the integrated map, thus enabling comparisons with the leprosy bacillus, Mycobacterium leprae, to be undertaken. Mycobacterial genomes appear to have evolved as mosaic structures since extended segments with conserved gene order and organization are interspersed with different flanking regions. Repetitive sequences and insertion elements are highly abundant in M. tuberculosis, but the distribution of IS6110 is apparently nonrandom.
ESTHER : Philipp_1996_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_93_3132
PubMedSearch : Philipp_1996_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_93_3132
PubMedID: 8610181
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-Rv3487c

Title : Use of an ordered cosmid library to deduce the genomic organization of Mycobacterium leprae - Eiglmeier_1993_Mol.Microbiol_7_197
Author(s) : Eiglmeier K , Honore N , Woods SA , Caudron B , Cole ST
Ref : Molecular Microbiology , 7 :197 , 1993
Abstract : In an attempt to unify the genetic and biological research on Mycobacterium leprae, the aetiological agent of leprosy, a cosmid library was constructed and then ordered by a combination of fingerprinting and hybridization techniques. The genome of M. leprae is represented by four contigs of overlapping clones which, together, account for nearly 2.8Mb of DNA. Several arguments suggest that the gaps between the contigs are small in size and that virtually complete coverage of the chromosome has been obtained. All of the cloned M. leprae genes have been positioned on the contig maps together with the 29 copies of the dispersed repetitive element, RLEP. These have been classified into four groups on the basis of differences in their organization. Several key housekeeping genes were identified and mapped by hybridization with heterologous probes, and the current genome map of this uncultivable pathogen comprises 72 loci.
ESTHER : Eiglmeier_1993_Mol.Microbiol_7_197
PubMedSearch : Eiglmeier_1993_Mol.Microbiol_7_197
PubMedID: 8446027
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-MLC1351.21C , mycle-MLCB22.16c , mycle-PTRB , mycle-tpea