Lombard V

References (10)

Title : Dividing the Large Glycoside Hydrolase Family 43 into Subfamilies: a Motivation for Detailed Enzyme Characterization - Mewis_2016_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_82_1686
Author(s) : Mewis K , Lenfant N , Lombard V , Henrissat B
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 82 :1686 , 2016
Abstract : The rapid rise in DNA sequencing has led to an expansion in the number of glycoside hydrolase (GH) families. The GH43 family currently contains alpha-l-arabinofuranosidase, beta-d-xylosidase, alpha-l-arabinanase, and beta-d-galactosidase enzymes for the debranching and degradation of hemicellulose and pectin polymers. Many studies have revealed finer details about members of GH43 that necessitate the division of GH43 into subfamilies, as was done previously for the GH5 and GH13 families. The work presented here is a robust subfamily classification that assigns over 91% of all complete GH43 domains into 37 subfamilies that correlate with conserved sequence residues and results of biochemical assays and structural studies. Furthermore, cooccurrence analysis of these subfamilies and other functional modules revealed strong associations between some GH43 subfamilies and CBM6 and CBM13 domains. Cooccurrence analysis also revealed the presence of proteins containing up to three GH43 domains and belonging to different subfamilies, suggesting significant functional differences for each subfamily. Overall, the subfamily analysis suggests that the GH43 enzymes probably display a hitherto underestimated variety of subtle specificity features that are not apparent when the enzymes are assayed with simple synthetic substrates, such as pNP-glycosides.
ESTHER : Mewis_2016_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_82_1686
PubMedSearch : Mewis_2016_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_82_1686
PubMedID: 26729713

Title : Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot\/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi - Riley_2014_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_111_9923
Author(s) : Riley R , Salamov AA , Brown DW , Nagy LG , Floudas D , Held BW , Levasseur A , Lombard V , Morin E , Otillar R , Lindquist EA , Sun H , LaButti KM , Schmutz J , Jabbour D , Luo H , Baker SE , Pisabarro AG , Walton JD , Blanchette RA , Henrissat B , Martin F , Cullen D , Hibbett DS , Grigoriev IV
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 111 :9923 , 2014
Abstract : Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white-rot/brown-rot classification paradigm, we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically informed principal-components analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white-rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown-rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white-rot and brown-rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.
ESTHER : Riley_2014_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_111_9923
PubMedSearch : Riley_2014_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_111_9923
PubMedID: 24958869
Gene_locus related to this paper: pleos-a0a067nlj6 , 9agar-a0a067t0n0 , 9agar-a0a067sha0 , 9homo-a0a067pav0 , pleos-a0a067n337 , 9homo-a0a067pz82 , 9homo-a0a067m7p7 , pleos-a0a067p245 , 9homo-a0a067lrz6 , 9homo-a0a067m4r5 , 9homo-a0a067mr63 , 9homo-a0a067mrq8 , 9agar-a0a067t4j6 , 9homo-a0a067pdz2 , 9homo-a0a067q2n9 , 9agar-a0a067tsx5 , 9homo-a0a067mfq5 , 9homo-a0a067qc90 , pleos-a0a067p113 , 9homo-a0a067pwi6 , 9agar-a0a067s6d7 , 9agar-a0a067tie7 , pleos-a0a067ngc3 , 9agar-a0a067st69 , 9agar-a0a067t6h9 , 9agar-a0a067tj80 , pleos-a0a067npl2 , 9agar-a0a067sm07 , 9agar-a0a067tar9 , 9agar-a0a067tid6 , 9agar-a0a067u335 , pleos-a0a067ndv5 , pleos-a0a067nqw6 , 9homo-a0a067pkj2 , 9agar-a0a067t683 , 9homo-a0a067mgl1 , 9agar-a0a067sg35 , 9homo-a0a067q7g6 , 9agar-a0a067tub0 , 9agar-a0a067t8f5 , 9agar-a0a067tj19 , 9homo-a0a067pyu9 , 9agar-a0a067tjp8 , 9agar-a0a067sjg9 , 9agar-a0a067u0h4 , pleos-a0a067nxe9 , 9agar-a0a067sqt2 , 9agar-a0a067tgx3 , 9homo-a0a067psv8 , 9agar-a0a067sq58 , 9homo-a0a067m4m0 , 9agar-a0a067tqz5 , pleos-a0a067new9 , 9homo-a0a067m9v3 , 9agar-a0a067tlx5 , 9agar-a0a067tfq4 , pleos-a0a067nln4 , pleos-a0a067ndf5 , pleos-a0a067nn26 , pleos-a0a067nfv2 , 9homo-a0a067pnd3 , 9agar-a0a067sw48 , pleos-a0a067neg3 , pleos-a0a067nz51 , pleos-a0a067naf9 , pleos-a0a067nad7 , 9agar-a0a067sxe2 , 9agar-a0a067slu3 , pleos-a0a067n7p8 , pleos-a0a067nl60 , pleos-a0a067ncd0 , 9agar-a0a067th99 , 9agar-a0a067sp22 , pleos-a0a067pbw7 , 9homo-a0a067q916 , 9homo-a0a067pwe5 , galm3-a0a067scb0 , galm3-popa

Title : Bacteria from diverse habitats colonize and compete in the mouse gut - Seedorf_2014_Cell_159_253
Author(s) : Seedorf H , Griffin NW , Ridaura VK , Reyes A , Cheng J , Rey FE , Smith MI , Simon GM , Scheffrahn RH , Woebken D , Spormann AM , Van Treuren W , Ursell LK , Pirrung M , Robbins-Pianka A , Cantarel BL , Lombard V , Henrissat B , Knight R , Gordon JI
Ref : Cell , 159 :253 , 2014
Abstract : To study how microbes establish themselves in a mammalian gut environment, we colonized germ-free mice with microbial communities from human, zebrafish, and termite guts, human skin and tongue, soil, and estuarine microbial mats. Bacteria from these foreign environments colonized and persisted in the mouse gut; their capacity to metabolize dietary and host carbohydrates and bile acids correlated with colonization success. Cohousing mice harboring these xenomicrobiota or a mouse cecal microbiota, along with germ-free "bystanders," revealed the success of particular bacterial taxa in invading guts with established communities and empty gut habitats. Unanticipated patterns of ecological succession were observed; for example, a soil-derived bacterium dominated even in the presence of bacteria from other gut communities (zebrafish and termite), and human-derived bacteria colonized germ-free bystander mice before mouse-derived organisms. This approach can be generalized to address a variety of mechanistic questions about succession, including succession in the context of microbiota-directed therapeutics.
ESTHER : Seedorf_2014_Cell_159_253
PubMedSearch : Seedorf_2014_Cell_159_253
PubMedID: 25284151
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9firm-a0a0j1g143

Title : Genome sequence of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus reveals mechanisms governing adaptation to a humic-rich ecological niche - Morin_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_17501
Author(s) : Morin E , Kohler A , Baker AR , Foulongne-Oriol M , Lombard V , Nagy LG , Ohm RA , Patyshakuliyeva A , Brun A , Aerts AL , Bailey AM , Billette C , Coutinho PM , Deakin G , Doddapaneni H , Floudas D , Grimwood J , Hilden K , Kues U , LaButti KM , Lapidus A , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Murat C , Riley RW , Salamov AA , Schmutz J , Subramanian V , Wosten HA , Xu J , Eastwood DC , Foster GD , Sonnenberg AS , Cullen D , de Vries RP , Lundell T , Hibbett DS , Henrissat B , Burton KS , Kerrigan RW , Challen MP , Grigoriev IV , Martin F
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 109 :17501 , 2012
Abstract : Agaricus bisporus is the model fungus for the adaptation, persistence, and growth in the humic-rich leaf-litter environment. Aside from its ecological role, A. bisporus has been an important component of the human diet for over 200 y and worldwide cultivation of the "button mushroom" forms a multibillion dollar industry. We present two A. bisporus genomes, their gene repertoires and transcript profiles on compost and during mushroom formation. The genomes encode a full repertoire of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes similar to that of wood-decayers. Comparative transcriptomics of mycelium grown on defined medium, casing-soil, and compost revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in xylan, cellulose, pectin, and protein degradation are more highly expressed in compost. The striking expansion of heme-thiolate peroxidases and beta-etherases is distinctive from Agaricomycotina wood-decayers and suggests a broad attack on decaying lignin and related metabolites found in humic acid-rich environment. Similarly, up-regulation of these genes together with a lignolytic manganese peroxidase, multiple copper radical oxidases, and cytochrome P450s is consistent with challenges posed by complex humic-rich substrates. The gene repertoire and expression of hydrolytic enzymes in A. bisporus is substantially different from the taxonomically related ectomycorrhizal symbiont Laccaria bicolor. A common promoter motif was also identified in genes very highly expressed in humic-rich substrates. These observations reveal genetic and enzymatic mechanisms governing adaptation to the humic-rich ecological niche formed during plant degradation, further defining the critical role such fungi contribute to soil structure and carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. Genome sequence will expedite mushroom breeding for improved agronomic characteristics.
ESTHER : Morin_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_17501
PubMedSearch : Morin_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_17501
PubMedID: 23045686
Gene_locus related to this paper: agabu-k5x1b4 , agabu-k5x521 , agabu-k5w389 , agabu-k5wbk9 , agabu-k5wrh0 , agabu-k5ws85 , agabu-k5wsf9 , agabu-k5wxv1 , agabu-k5x0d9 , agabu-k5x588 , agabu-k5x5x2 , agabu-k5xd51 , agabu-k5xh54 , agabu-k5xsm1 , agabu-k5xsp8 , agabu-k5xtc1 , agabu-k5y2v2 , agabb-k9i3g9 , agabb-k9hnv7 , agabb-k9hr46 , agabu-k5wys0

Title : The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic lignin decomposition reconstructed from 31 fungal genomes - Floudas_2012_Science_336_1715
Author(s) : Floudas D , Binder M , Riley R , Barry K , Blanchette RA , Henrissat B , Martinez AT , Otillar R , Spatafora JW , Yadav JS , Aerts A , Benoit I , Boyd A , Carlson A , Copeland A , Coutinho PM , de Vries RP , Ferreira P , Findley K , Foster B , Gaskell J , Glotzer D , Gorecki P , Heitman J , Hesse C , Hori C , Igarashi K , Jurgens JA , Kallen N , Kersten P , Kohler A , Kues U , Kumar TK , Kuo A , LaButti K , Larrondo LF , Lindquist E , Ling A , Lombard V , Lucas S , Lundell T , Martin R , McLaughlin DJ , Morgenstern I , Morin E , Murat C , Nagy LG , Nolan M , Ohm RA , Patyshakuliyeva A , Rokas A , Ruiz-Duenas FJ , Sabat G , Salamov A , Samejima M , Schmutz J , Slot JC , St John F , Stenlid J , Sun H , Sun S , Syed K , Tsang A , Wiebenga A , Young D , Pisabarro A , Eastwood DC , Martin F , Cullen D , Grigoriev IV , Hibbett DS
Ref : Science , 336 :1715 , 2012
Abstract : Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non-lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.
ESTHER : Floudas_2012_Science_336_1715
PubMedSearch : Floudas_2012_Science_336_1715
PubMedID: 22745431
Gene_locus related to this paper: aurde-j0d098 , aurde-j0dc31 , glota-s7rlc1 , fompi-s8f7s4 , dacsp-m5fpg2 , dicsq-r7sm16 , dacsp-m5g7q5 , dacsp-m5fr12 , glota-s7q5w3 , fompi-s8f826.1 , fompi-s8f826.2 , dicsq-r7sy09 , glota-s7rt87 , dicsq-r7t032 , glota-s7rym7 , fompi-s8fiv2 , dacsp-m5gda3.2 , dicsq-r7swi6 , dacsp-m5frf2 , fompi-s8ebb6 , dicsq-r7sln3 , dicsq-r7sya6 , dacsp-m5g7g1 , dicsq-r7syx7 , dicsq-r7sx57 , dacsp-m5fps7 , glota-s7pwi7 , dicsq-r7swj6 , fompi-s8ejq6 , dicsq-r7spc3 , glota-s7q258 , dacsp-m5ft65 , glota-s7q3m7 , fompi-s8dkc7 , glota-s7q1z1 , fompi-s8eqi2 , glota-s7q1z8 , fompi-s8du50 , dacsp-m5gg33 , dacsp-m5g3a7 , fompi-s8ecd7 , fompi-s8dps1 , dacsp-m5fwr0 , dicsq-r7sub7 , glota-s7q8k9 , fompi-s8ffc3 , dacsp-m5g2f9 , fompi-s8ecc2 , dacsp-m5g868 , fompi-s8f890 , dicsq-r7t1a8 , fompi-s8ebx4 , fompi-s8eb97 , glota-s7q222 , glota-s7puf0 , fompi-s8f6v9 , dacsp-m5g0z2 , dacsp-m5gdh9 , fompi-s8fb37 , dacsp-m5fy91 , glota-s7q5v6 , fompi-s8fl44 , dicsq-r7stv9 , dicsq-r7szk3 , fompi-s8epq9 , glota-s7rh56 , dacsp-m5gbt1 , punst-r7s3x9 , punst-r7s0t5 , glota-s7q312 , glota-s7rhh6 , dicsq-r7t117 , dicsq-r7slz3

Title : Comparative genomics of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Phanerochaete chrysosporium provide insight into selective ligninolysis - Fernandez-Fueyo_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_5458
Author(s) : Fernandez-Fueyo E , Ruiz-Duenas FJ , Ferreira P , Floudas D , Hibbett DS , Canessa P , Larrondo LF , James TY , Seelenfreund D , Lobos S , Polanco R , Tello M , Honda Y , Watanabe T , Ryu JS , Kubicek CP , Schmoll M , Gaskell J , Hammel KE , St John FJ , Vanden Wymelenberg A , Sabat G , Splinter BonDurant S , Syed K , Yadav JS , Doddapaneni H , Subramanian V , Lavin JL , Oguiza JA , Perez G , Pisabarro AG , Ramirez L , Santoyo F , Master E , Coutinho PM , Henrissat B , Lombard V , Magnuson JK , Kues U , Hori C , Igarashi K , Samejima M , Held BW , Barry KW , LaButti KM , Lapidus A , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Riley R , Salamov AA , Hoffmeister D , Schwenk D , Hadar Y , Yarden O , de Vries RP , Wiebenga A , Stenlid J , Eastwood D , Grigoriev IV , Berka RM , Blanchette RA , Kersten P , Martinez AT , Vicuna R , Cullen D
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 109 :5458 , 2012
Abstract : Efficient lignin depolymerization is unique to the wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as white rot fungi. Phanerochaete chrysosporium simultaneously degrades lignin and cellulose, whereas the closely related species, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, also depolymerizes lignin but may do so with relatively little cellulose degradation. To investigate the basis for selective ligninolysis, we conducted comparative genome analysis of C. subvermispora and P. chrysosporium. Genes encoding manganese peroxidase numbered 13 and five in C. subvermispora and P. chrysosporium, respectively. In addition, the C. subvermispora genome contains at least seven genes predicted to encode laccases, whereas the P. chrysosporium genome contains none. We also observed expansion of the number of C. subvermispora desaturase-encoding genes putatively involved in lipid metabolism. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis showed substantial up-regulation of several desaturase and MnP genes in wood-containing medium. MS identified MnP proteins in C. subvermispora culture filtrates, but none in P. chrysosporium cultures. These results support the importance of MnP and a lignin degradation mechanism whereby cleavage of the dominant nonphenolic structures is mediated by lipid peroxidation products. Two C. subvermispora genes were predicted to encode peroxidases structurally similar to P. chrysosporium lignin peroxidase and, following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, the enzymes were shown to oxidize high redox potential substrates, but not Mn(2+). Apart from oxidative lignin degradation, we also examined cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic systems in both fungi. In summary, the C. subvermispora genetic inventory and expression patterns exhibit increased oxidoreductase potential and diminished cellulolytic capability relative to P. chrysosporium.
ESTHER : Fernandez-Fueyo_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_5458
PubMedSearch : Fernandez-Fueyo_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_5458
PubMedID: 22434909
Gene_locus related to this paper: cers8-m2r3x2 , cers8-m2qf37 , cers8-m2pcy7 , cers8-m2pcz3 , cers8-m2qn26 , cers8-m2r654 , cers8-m2r8g9 , cers8-m2ps90 , cers8-m2qn44 , cers8-m2q837 , cers8-m2pjy6 , cers8-m2r609 , cers8-m2qy35 , cers8-m2r1n1 , cers8-m2rl22 , cers8-m2qkx5 , cers8-m2qib7 , cers8-m2rgs8 , cers8-m2rlx6 , cers8-m2r4p3 , cers8-m2rf62 , cers8-m2qyx5 , cers8-m2pcz2 , cers8-m2rm22 , cers8-m2qwb7 , cers8-m2r9u3 , cers8-m2pp23 , cers8-m2r613 , cers8-m2rup8 , cers8-m2piv7 , cers8-m2rch3 , cers8-m2qvf7 , cers8-m2qvb7 , cers8-m2qvb2 , cers8-m2pip7 , cers8-m2rb73 , cers8-m2qgd3 , cers8-m2rcg8 , cers8-m2rb68

Title : Insight into trade-off between wood decay and parasitism from the genome of a fungal forest pathogen - Olson_2012_New.Phytol_194_1001
Author(s) : Olson A , Aerts A , Asiegbu F , Belbahri L , Bouzid O , Broberg A , Canback B , Coutinho PM , Cullen D , Dalman K , Deflorio G , van Diepen LT , Dunand C , Duplessis S , Durling M , Gonthier P , Grimwood J , Fossdal CG , Hansson D , Henrissat B , Hietala A , Himmelstrand K , Hoffmeister D , Hogberg N , James TY , Karlsson M , Kohler A , Kues U , Lee YH , Lin YC , Lind M , Lindquist E , Lombard V , Lucas S , Lunden K , Morin E , Murat C , Park J , Raffaello T , Rouze P , Salamov A , Schmutz J , Solheim H , Stahlberg J , Velez H , de Vries RP , Wiebenga A , Woodward S , Yakovlev I , Garbelotto M , Martin F , Grigoriev IV , Stenlid J
Ref : New Phytol , 194 :1001 , 2012
Abstract : Parasitism and saprotrophic wood decay are two fungal strategies fundamental for succession and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. An opportunity to assess the trade-off between these strategies is provided by the forest pathogen and wood decayer Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato. We report the annotated genome sequence and transcript profiling, as well as the quantitative trait loci mapping, of one member of the species complex: H. irregulare. Quantitative trait loci critical for pathogenicity, and rich in transposable elements, orphan and secreted genes, were identified. A wide range of cellulose-degrading enzymes are expressed during wood decay. By contrast, pathogenic interaction between H. irregulare and pine engages fewer carbohydrate-active enzymes, but involves an increase in pectinolytic enzymes, transcription modules for oxidative stress and secondary metabolite production. Our results show a trade-off in terms of constrained carbohydrate decomposition and membrane transport capacity during interaction with living hosts. Our findings establish that saprotrophic wood decay and necrotrophic parasitism involve two distinct, yet overlapping, processes.
ESTHER : Olson_2012_New.Phytol_194_1001
PubMedSearch : Olson_2012_New.Phytol_194_1001
PubMedID: 22463738
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9homo-w4jrb9 , 9homo-w4jsg4 , 9homo-w4kds7 , 9homo-w4jwl9 , 9homo-w4kjy2 , 9homo-w4jw43 , 9homo-w4ka20 , 9homo-w4k8t3 , 9homo-w4jz43 , 9homo-w4k8q2 , 9homo-w4k910 , 9homo-w4k6f5 , 9homo-w4k6j3 , 9homo-w4k8n2 , 9homo-w4jrf3 , 9homo-w4ke07 , 9homo-w4k3i8 , 9homo-w4jqh1 , 9agam-w4k203 , 9agam-w4jpy3 , 9agam-w4jn81 , 9agam-w4jmz2

Title : Finished genome of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola reveals dispensome structure, chromosome plasticity, and stealth pathogenesis - Goodwin_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002070
Author(s) : Goodwin SB , M'Barek S B , Dhillon B , Wittenberg AH , Crane CF , Hane JK , Foster AJ , Van der Lee TA , Grimwood J , Aerts A , Antoniw J , Bailey A , Bluhm B , Bowler J , Bristow J , van der Burgt A , Canto-Canche B , Churchill AC , Conde-Ferraez L , Cools HJ , Coutinho PM , Csukai M , Dehal P , De Wit P , Donzelli B , van de Geest HC , van Ham RC , Hammond-Kosack KE , Henrissat B , Kilian A , Kobayashi AK , Koopmann E , Kourmpetis Y , Kuzniar A , Lindquist E , Lombard V , Maliepaard C , Martins N , Mehrabi R , Nap JP , Ponomarenko A , Rudd JJ , Salamov A , Schmutz J , Schouten HJ , Shapiro H , Stergiopoulos I , Torriani SF , Tu H , de Vries RP , Waalwijk C , Ware SB , Wiebenga A , Zwiers LH , Oliver RP , Grigoriev IV , Kema GH
Ref : PLoS Genet , 7 :e1002070 , 2011
Abstract : The plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (asexual stage: Septoria tritici) causes septoria tritici blotch, a disease that greatly reduces the yield and quality of wheat. This disease is economically important in most wheat-growing areas worldwide and threatens global food production. Control of the disease has been hampered by a limited understanding of the genetic and biochemical bases of pathogenicity, including mechanisms of infection and of resistance in the host. Unlike most other plant pathogens, M. graminicola has a long latent period during which it evades host defenses. Although this type of stealth pathogenicity occurs commonly in Mycosphaerella and other Dothideomycetes, the largest class of plant-pathogenic fungi, its genetic basis is not known. To address this problem, the genome of M. graminicola was sequenced completely. The finished genome contains 21 chromosomes, eight of which could be lost with no visible effect on the fungus and thus are dispensable. This eight-chromosome dispensome is dynamic in field and progeny isolates, is different from the core genome in gene and repeat content, and appears to have originated by ancient horizontal transfer from an unknown donor. Synteny plots of the M. graminicola chromosomes versus those of the only other sequenced Dothideomycete, Stagonospora nodorum, revealed conservation of gene content but not order or orientation, suggesting a high rate of intra-chromosomal rearrangement in one or both species. This observed "mesosynteny" is very different from synteny seen between other organisms. A surprising feature of the M. graminicola genome compared to other sequenced plant pathogens was that it contained very few genes for enzymes that break down plant cell walls, which was more similar to endophytes than to pathogens. The stealth pathogenesis of M. graminicola probably involves degradation of proteins rather than carbohydrates to evade host defenses during the biotrophic stage of infection and may have evolved from endophytic ancestors.
ESTHER : Goodwin_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002070
PubMedSearch : Goodwin_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002070
PubMedID: 21695235
Gene_locus related to this paper: zymti-f9wzw8 , zymti-f9x2y6 , zymti-f9x423 , zymti-f9x813 , zymti-f9xa54 , zymti-f9xb42 , zymti-f9xbu5 , zymti-f9xcr9 , zymti-f9xdr7 , zymti-f9xer1 , zymti-f9xez8 , zymti-f9xfz9 , zymti-f9xh29 , zymti-f9xhe7 , zymti-f9xhr4 , zymti-f9xk09 , zymti-f9xns5 , zymti-f9xiu1 , zymti-f9xng3 , zymti-f9x4f2 , zymti-f9x4s7 , zymti-f9xdm8 , zymti-f9wwy9 , zymti-f9xkf2 , zymti-f9xlt3 , zymti-f9x0i3 , zymti-f9wwa6 , zymti-f9wyk7 , zymti-f9x3z1 , zymti-f9xf16 , zymtr-a0a1x7rhi5 , zymti-f9xfj3 , zymti-pks1

Title : Comparative genomic analysis of the thermophilic biomass-degrading fungi Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris - Berka_2011_Nat.Biotechnol_29_922
Author(s) : Berka RM , Grigoriev IV , Otillar R , Salamov A , Grimwood J , Reid I , Ishmael N , John T , Darmond C , Moisan MC , Henrissat B , Coutinho PM , Lombard V , Natvig DO , Lindquist E , Schmutz J , Lucas S , Harris P , Powlowski J , Bellemare A , Taylor D , Butler G , de Vries RP , Allijn IE , van den Brink J , Ushinsky S , Storms R , Powell AJ , Paulsen IT , Elbourne LD , Baker SE , Magnuson J , Laboissiere S , Clutterbuck AJ , Martinez D , Wogulis M , de Leon AL , Rey MW , Tsang A
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 29 :922 , 2011
Abstract : Thermostable enzymes and thermophilic cell factories may afford economic advantages in the production of many chemicals and biomass-based fuels. Here we describe and compare the genomes of two thermophilic fungi, Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris. To our knowledge, these genomes are the first described for thermophilic eukaryotes and the first complete telomere-to-telomere genomes for filamentous fungi. Genome analyses and experimental data suggest that both thermophiles are capable of hydrolyzing all major polysaccharides found in biomass. Examination of transcriptome data and secreted proteins suggests that the two fungi use shared approaches in the hydrolysis of cellulose and xylan but distinct mechanisms in pectin degradation. Characterization of the biomass-hydrolyzing activity of recombinant enzymes suggests that these organisms are highly efficient in biomass decomposition at both moderate and high temperatures. Furthermore, we present evidence suggesting that aside from representing a potential reservoir of thermostable enzymes, thermophilic fungi are amenable to manipulation using classical and molecular genetics.
ESTHER : Berka_2011_Nat.Biotechnol_29_922
PubMedSearch : Berka_2011_Nat.Biotechnol_29_922
PubMedID: 21964414
Gene_locus related to this paper: thiha-cip2 , thite-g2r8b5 , thite-g2rcm8 , thite-g2r192 , thiha-g2qdy2 , thiha-g2qh51 , thite-g2rae6 , thite-g2r5h0 , thiha-g2qj94 , thiha-g2qnb2 , thite-g2rg14 , myctt-g2q973 , thite-g2qtu3 , myctt-g2qpr0 , thite-g2rhm0 , 9pezi-a0a3s4b069 , myctt-g2qmb4 , thett-g2qur2

Title : Genome sequence of the model mushroom Schizophyllum commune - Ohm_2010_Nat.Biotechnol_28_957
Author(s) : Ohm RA , de Jong JF , Lugones LG , Aerts A , Kothe E , Stajich JE , de Vries RP , Record E , Levasseur A , Baker SE , Bartholomew KA , Coutinho PM , Erdmann S , Fowler TJ , Gathman AC , Lombard V , Henrissat B , Knabe N , Kues U , Lilly WW , Lindquist E , Lucas S , Magnuson JK , Piumi F , Raudaskoski M , Salamov A , Schmutz J , Schwarze FW , vanKuyk PA , Horton JS , Grigoriev IV , Wosten HA
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 28 :957 , 2010
Abstract : Much remains to be learned about the biology of mushroom-forming fungi, which are an important source of food, secondary metabolites and industrial enzymes. The wood-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune is both a genetically tractable model for studying mushroom development and a likely source of enzymes capable of efficient degradation of lignocellulosic biomass. Comparative analyses of its 38.5-megabase genome, which encodes 13,210 predicted genes, reveal the species's unique wood-degrading machinery. One-third of the 471 genes predicted to encode transcription factors are differentially expressed during sexual development of S. commune. Whereas inactivation of one of these, fst4, prevented mushroom formation, inactivation of another, fst3, resulted in more, albeit smaller, mushrooms than in the wild-type fungus. Antisense transcripts may also have a role in the formation of fruiting bodies. Better insight into the mechanisms underlying mushroom formation should affect commercial production of mushrooms and their industrial use for producing enzymes and pharmaceuticals.
ESTHER : Ohm_2010_Nat.Biotechnol_28_957
PubMedSearch : Ohm_2010_Nat.Biotechnol_28_957
PubMedID: 20622885
Gene_locus related to this paper: schcm-d8pqz6 , schcm-d8prj2 , schcm-d8pug6 , schcm-d8pxe8 , schcm-d8pxe9 , schcm-d8pxz1 , schcm-d8q1c7 , schcm-d8q2b4 , schcm-d8q3j1 , schcm-d8q5m5 , schcm-d8q7x7.1 , schcm-d8q7x7.2 , schcm-d8q8y8 , schcm-d8q9n6 , schcm-d8q697 , schcm-d8qip8 , schcm-d8q5s5 , schcm-d8ppb3 , schcm-d8ppb6 , schcm-d8pv73 , schcm-d8pzm1 , schcm-d8q5a7 , schcm-d8qif0