Gilna P

References (6)

Title : The complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam - Challacombe_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_3680
Author(s) : Challacombe JF , Altherr MR , Xie G , Bhotika SS , Brown N , Bruce D , Campbell CS , Campbell ML , Chen J , Chertkov O , Cleland C , Dimitrijevic M , Doggett NA , Fawcett JJ , Glavina T , Goodwin LA , Green LD , Han CS , Hill KK , Hitchcock P , Jackson PJ , Keim P , Kewalramani AR , Longmire J , Lucas S , Malfatti S , Martinez D , McMurry K , Meincke LJ , Misra M , Moseman BL , Mundt M , Munk AC , Okinaka RT , Parson-Quintana B , Reilly LP , Richardson P , Robinson DL , Saunders E , Tapia R , Tesmer JG , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Tice H , Ticknor LO , Wills PL , Gilna P , Brettin TS
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 189 :3680 , 2007
Abstract : Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that is widely used as a biopesticide (E. Schnepf, N. Crickmore, J. Van Rie, D. Lereclus, J. Baum, J. Feitelson, D. R. Zeigler, and D. H. Dean, Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 62:775-806, 1998). Here we report the finished, annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis Al Hakam, which was collected in Iraq by the United Nations Special Commission (L. Radnedge, P. Agron, K. Hill, P. Jackson, L. Ticknor, P. Keim, and G. Andersen, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:2755-2764, 2003).
ESTHER : Challacombe_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_3680
PubMedSearch : Challacombe_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_3680
PubMedID: 17337577
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacah-a0rcd1 , bacah-a0rer5 , bacah-a0rev7 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacc1-q73a27 , bacc1-q73c93 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx , bachk-q6hcl3 , bachk-q6hgn4 , bachk-q6hgp9 , bachk-q6hig3 , bachk-q6hit8

Title : Complete genomic characterization of a pathogenic A.II strain of Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis - Beckstrom-Sternberg_2007_PLoS.One_2_e947
Author(s) : Beckstrom-Sternberg SM , Auerbach RK , Godbole S , Pearson JV , Beckstrom-Sternberg JS , Deng Z , Munk C , Kubota K , Zhou Y , Bruce D , Noronha J , Scheuermann RH , Wang A , Wei X , Wang J , Hao J , Wagner DM , Brettin TS , Brown N , Gilna P , Keim PS
Ref : PLoS ONE , 2 :e947 , 2007
Abstract : Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia, which is a highly lethal disease from nature and potentially from a biological weapon. This species contains four recognized subspecies including the North American endemic F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A), whose genetic diversity is correlated with its geographic distribution including a major population subdivision referred to as A.I and A.II. The biological significance of the A.I - A.II genetic differentiation is unknown, though there are suggestive ecological and epidemiological correlations. In order to understand the differentiation at the genomic level, we have determined the complete sequence of an A.II strain (WY96-3418) and compared it to the genome of Schu S4 from the A.I population. We find that this A.II genome is 1,898,476 bp in size with 1,820 genes, 1,303 of which code for proteins. While extensive genomic variation exists between "WY96" and Schu S4, there is only one whole gene difference. This one gene difference is a hypothetical protein of unknown function. In contrast, there are numerous SNPs (3,367), small indels (1,015), IS element differences (7) and large chromosomal rearrangements (31), including both inversions and translocations. The rearrangement borders are frequently associated with IS elements, which would facilitate intragenomic recombination events. The pathogenicity island duplicated regions (DR1 and DR2) are essentially identical in WY96 but vary relative to Schu S4 at 60 nucleotide positions. Other potential virulence-associated genes (231) varied at 559 nucleotide positions, including 357 non-synonymous changes. Molecular clock estimates for the divergence time between A.I and A.II genomes for different chromosomal regions ranged from 866 to 2131 years before present. This paper is the first complete genomic characterization of a member of the A.II clade of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis.
ESTHER : Beckstrom-Sternberg_2007_PLoS.One_2_e947
PubMedSearch : Beckstrom-Sternberg_2007_PLoS.One_2_e947
PubMedID: 17895988
Gene_locus related to this paper: fratt-q5ngu5

Title : Genome sequence of the cellulolytic gliding bacterium Cytophaga hutchinsonii - Xie_2007_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_73_3536
Author(s) : Xie G , Bruce DC , Challacombe JF , Chertkov O , Detter JC , Gilna P , Han CS , Lucas S , Misra M , Myers GL , Richardson P , Tapia R , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Brettin TS , Henrissat B , Wilson DB , McBride MJ
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 73 :3536 , 2007
Abstract : The complete DNA sequence of the aerobic cellulolytic soil bacterium Cytophaga hutchinsonii, which belongs to the phylum Bacteroidetes, is presented. The genome consists of a single, circular, 4.43-Mb chromosome containing 3,790 open reading frames, 1,986 of which have been assigned a tentative function. Two of the most striking characteristics of C. hutchinsonii are its rapid gliding motility over surfaces and its contact-dependent digestion of crystalline cellulose. The mechanism of C. hutchinsonii motility is not known, but its genome contains homologs for each of the gld genes that are required for gliding of the distantly related bacteroidete Flavobacterium johnsoniae. Cytophaga-Flavobacterium gliding appears to be novel and does not involve well-studied motility organelles such as flagella or type IV pili. Many genes thought to encode proteins involved in cellulose utilization were identified. These include candidate endo-beta-1,4-glucanases and beta-glucosidases. Surprisingly, obvious homologs of known cellobiohydrolases were not detected. Since such enzymes are needed for efficient cellulose digestion by well-studied cellulolytic bacteria, C. hutchinsonii either has novel cellobiohydrolases or has an unusual method of cellulose utilization. Genes encoding proteins with cohesin domains, which are characteristic of cellulosomes, were absent, but many proteins predicted to be involved in polysaccharide utilization had putative D5 domains, which are thought to be involved in anchoring proteins to the cell surface.
ESTHER : Xie_2007_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_73_3536
PubMedSearch : Xie_2007_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_73_3536
PubMedID: 17400776
Gene_locus related to this paper: cyth3-q11pu3 , cyth3-q11rb1 , cyth3-q11sp5 , cyth3-q11sp6 , cyth3-q11ty5 , cyth3-q11vh6 , cyth3-q11vj5 , cyth3-q11w17 , cyth3-q11xy0

Title : Pathogenomic sequence analysis of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates closely related to Bacillus anthracis - Han_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_3382
Author(s) : Han CS , Xie G , Challacombe JF , Altherr MR , Bhotika SS , Brown N , Bruce D , Campbell CS , Campbell ML , Chen J , Chertkov O , Cleland C , Dimitrijevic M , Doggett NA , Fawcett JJ , Glavina T , Goodwin LA , Green LD , Hill KK , Hitchcock P , Jackson PJ , Keim P , Kewalramani AR , Longmire J , Lucas S , Malfatti S , McMurry K , Meincke LJ , Misra M , Moseman BL , Mundt M , Munk AC , Okinaka RT , Parson-Quintana B , Reilly LP , Richardson P , Robinson DL , Rubin E , Saunders E , Tapia R , Tesmer JG , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Tice H , Ticknor LO , Wills PL , Brettin TS , Gilna P
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 188 :3382 , 2006
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis are closely related gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria of the B. cereus sensu lato group. While independently derived strains of B. anthracis reveal conspicuous sequence homogeneity, environmental isolates of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis exhibit extensive genetic diversity. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of the genomes of two members of the B. cereus group, B. thuringiensis 97-27 subsp. konkukian serotype H34, isolated from a necrotic human wound, and B. cereus E33L, which was isolated from a swab of a zebra carcass in Namibia. These two strains, when analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism within a collection of over 300 of B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis isolates, appear closely related to B. anthracis. The B. cereus E33L isolate appears to be the nearest relative to B. anthracis identified thus far. Whole-genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis 97-27and B. cereus E33L was undertaken to identify shared and unique genes among these isolates in comparison to the genomes of pathogenic strains B. anthracis Ames and B. cereus G9241 and nonpathogenic strains B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Comparison of these genomes revealed differences in terms of virulence, metabolic competence, structural components, and regulatory mechanisms.
ESTHER : Han_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_3382
PubMedSearch : Han_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_3382
PubMedID: 16621833
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA2607 , bacce-BC0968 , bacce-BC3133 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-c2mr40 , baccz-q63gk2

Title : The Methanosarcina barkeri genome: comparative analysis with Methanosarcina acetivorans and Methanosarcina mazei reveals extensive rearrangement within methanosarcinal genomes - Maeder_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7922
Author(s) : Maeder DL , Anderson I , Brettin TS , Bruce DC , Gilna P , Han CS , Lapidus A , Metcalf WW , Saunders E , Tapia R , Sowers KR
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 188 :7922 , 2006
Abstract : We report here a comparative analysis of the genome sequence of Methanosarcina barkeri with those of Methanosarcina acetivorans and Methanosarcina mazei. The genome of M. barkeri is distinguished by having an organization that is well conserved with respect to the other Methanosarcina spp. in the region proximal to the origin of replication, with interspecies gene similarities as high as 95%. However, it is disordered and marked by increased transposase frequency and decreased gene synteny and gene density in the distal semigenome. Of the 3,680 open reading frames (ORFs) in M. barkeri, 746 had homologs with better than 80% identity to both M. acetivorans and M. mazei, while 128 nonhypothetical ORFs were unique (nonorthologous) among these species, including a complete formate dehydrogenase operon, genes required for N-acetylmuramic acid synthesis, a 14-gene gas vesicle cluster, and a bacterial-like P450-specific ferredoxin reductase cluster not previously observed or characterized for this genus. A cryptic 36-kbp plasmid sequence that contains an orc1 gene flanked by a presumptive origin of replication consisting of 38 tandem repeats of a 143-nucleotide motif was detected in M. barkeri. Three-way comparison of these genomes reveals differing mechanisms for the accrual of changes. Elongation of the relatively large M. acetivorans genome is the result of uniformly distributed multiple gene scale insertions and duplications, while the M. barkeri genome is characterized by localized inversions associated with the loss of gene content. In contrast, the short M. mazei genome most closely approximates the putative ancestral organizational state of these species.
ESTHER : Maeder_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7922
PubMedSearch : Maeder_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7922
PubMedID: 16980466
Gene_locus related to this paper: metbf-q46ca9 , metbf-q469u5

Title : The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16 - Martin_2004_Nature_432_988
Author(s) : Martin J , Han C , Gordon LA , Terry A , Prabhakar S , She X , Xie G , Hellsten U , Chan YM , Altherr M , Couronne O , Aerts A , Bajorek E , Black S , Blumer H , Branscomb E , Brown NC , Bruno WJ , Buckingham JM , Callen DF , Campbell CS , Campbell ML , Campbell EW , Caoile C , Challacombe JF , Chasteen LA , Chertkov O , Chi HC , Christensen M , Clark LM , Cohn JD , Denys M , Detter JC , Dickson M , Dimitrijevic-Bussod M , Escobar J , Fawcett JJ , Flowers D , Fotopulos D , Glavina T , Gomez M , Gonzales E , Goodstein D , Goodwin LA , Grady DL , Grigoriev I , Groza M , Hammon N , Hawkins T , Haydu L , Hildebrand CE , Huang W , Israni S , Jett J , Jewett PB , Kadner K , Kimball H , Kobayashi A , Krawczyk MC , Leyba T , Longmire JL , Lopez F , Lou Y , Lowry S , Ludeman T , Manohar CF , Mark GA , McMurray KL , Meincke LJ , Morgan J , Moyzis RK , Mundt MO , Munk AC , Nandkeshwar RD , Pitluck S , Pollard M , Predki P , Parson-Quintana B , Ramirez L , Rash S , Retterer J , Ricke DO , Robinson DL , Rodriguez A , Salamov A , Saunders EH , Scott D , Shough T , Stallings RL , Stalvey M , Sutherland RD , Tapia R , Tesmer JG , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Tice H , Torney DC , Tran-Gyamfi M , Tsai M , Ulanovsky LE , Ustaszewska A , Vo N , White PS , Williams AL , Wills PL , Wu JR , Wu K , Yang J , DeJong P , Bruce D , Doggett NA , Deaven L , Schmutz J , Grimwood J , Richardson P , Rokhsar DS , Eichler EE , Gilna P , Lucas SM , Myers RM , Rubin EM , Pennacchio LA
Ref : Nature , 432 :988 , 2004
Abstract : Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.
ESTHER : Martin_2004_Nature_432_988
PubMedSearch : Martin_2004_Nature_432_988
PubMedID: 15616553
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-CES1 , human-CES2 , human-CES3 , human-CES4A , human-CES5A