Thompson LS

References (6)

Title : Three genomes from the phylum Acidobacteria provide insight into the lifestyles of these microorganisms in soils - Ward_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_2046
Author(s) : Ward NL , Challacombe JF , Janssen PH , Henrissat B , Coutinho PM , Wu M , Xie G , Haft DH , Sait M , Badger J , Barabote RD , Bradley B , Brettin TS , Brinkac LM , Bruce D , Creasy T , Daugherty SC , Davidsen TM , DeBoy RT , Detter JC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Ganapathy A , Gwinn-Giglio M , Han CS , Khouri H , Kiss H , Kothari SP , Madupu R , Nelson KE , Nelson WC , Paulsen I , Penn K , Ren Q , Rosovitz MJ , Selengut JD , Shrivastava S , Sullivan SA , Tapia R , Thompson LS , Watkins KL , Yang Q , Yu C , Zafar N , Zhou L , Kuske CR
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 75 :2046 , 2009
Abstract : The complete genomes of three strains from the phylum Acidobacteria were compared. Phylogenetic analysis placed them as a unique phylum. They share genomic traits with members of the Proteobacteria, the Cyanobacteria, and the Fungi. The three strains appear to be versatile heterotrophs. Genomic and culture traits indicate the use of carbon sources that span simple sugars to more complex substrates such as hemicellulose, cellulose, and chitin. The genomes encode low-specificity major facilitator superfamily transporters and high-affinity ABC transporters for sugars, suggesting that they are best suited to low-nutrient conditions. They appear capable of nitrate and nitrite reduction but not N(2) fixation or denitrification. The genomes contained numerous genes that encode siderophore receptors, but no evidence of siderophore production was found, suggesting that they may obtain iron via interaction with other microorganisms. The presence of cellulose synthesis genes and a large class of novel high-molecular-weight excreted proteins suggests potential traits for desiccation resistance, biofilm formation, and/or contribution to soil structure. Polyketide synthase and macrolide glycosylation genes suggest the production of novel antimicrobial compounds. Genes that encode a variety of novel proteins were also identified. The abundance of acidobacteria in soils worldwide and the breadth of potential carbon use by the sequenced strains suggest significant and previously unrecognized contributions to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Combining our genomic evidence with available culture traits, we postulate that cells of these isolates are long-lived, divide slowly, exhibit slow metabolic rates under low-nutrient conditions, and are well equipped to tolerate fluctuations in soil hydration.
ESTHER : Ward_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_2046
PubMedSearch : Ward_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_2046
PubMedID: 19201974
Gene_locus related to this paper: korve-q1ihr9 , korve-q1ii02 , korve-q1iit0 , korve-q1ilk4 , korve-q1imj9 , korve-q1ims4 , korve-q1iqj0 , korve-q1isy7 , korve-q1itj5 , korve-q1itz6 , korve-q1ivc8 , acic5-c1f1u6 , acic5-c1f2i7 , acic5-c1f4m6 , acic5-c1f4y4 , acic5-c1f5a7 , acic5-c1f5u2 , acic5-c1f7a9 , acic5-c1f7x6 , acic5-c1f8y9 , acic5-c1f9m2 , acic5-c1f594 , acic5-c1f609 , acic5-c1f692 , acic5-c1f970 , acic5-c1fa52 , korve-q1iiw2 , korve-q1ivn9 , solue-q01nb0 , solue-q01qj6 , solue-q01r37 , solue-q01rq8 , solue-q01rz0 , solue-q01t44 , solue-q01t57 , solue-q01ts5 , solue-q01tv4 , solue-q01vd8 , solue-q01vr3 , solue-q01vw5 , solue-q01w12 , solue-q01wt9 , solue-q01y40 , solue-q01ym8 , solue-q01z24 , solue-q01z97 , solue-q01zl4 , solue-q01zm0 , solue-q01zm5 , solue-q01zm7 , solue-q02aa4 , solue-q02ab9 , solue-q02b72 , solue-q02bs8 , solue-q02bt7 , solue-q02cp0 , solue-q02d61 , solue-q020h3 , solue-q020i8 , solue-q021i6 , solue-q022b1 , solue-q022p8 , solue-q022q2 , solue-q022q3 , solue-q022x2 , solue-q022x5 , solue-q022x6 , solue-q022x8 , solue-q023e7 , solue-q024d9 , solue-q025c1 , solue-q026j1 , solue-q026k6 , solue-q026r6 , solue-q027p2 , solue-q027r8 , solue-q01zt5 , korve-q1itw6 , solue-q01yh7 , solue-q02ad6 , korve-q1imj6 , korve-q1iuf6 , acic5-c1f891 , solue-q026h7

Title : Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction - Anderson_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_2957
Author(s) : Anderson I , Rodriguez J , Susanti D , Porat I , Reich C , Ulrich LE , Elkins JG , Mavromatis K , Lykidis A , Kim E , Thompson LS , Nolan M , Land M , Copeland A , Lapidus A , Lucas S , Detter C , Zhulin IB , Olsen GJ , Whitman W , Mukhopadhyay B , Bristow J , Kyrpides N
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 190 :2957 , 2008
Abstract : We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deeply branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales in the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact, T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features that are common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known previously to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome revealed a substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may obtain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogen lyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time that this enzyme has been found outside the Methanosarcinales, and the presence of a presenilin-related protein. The predicted highly expressed proteins do not include proteins encoded by housekeeping genes and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-associated proteins.
ESTHER : Anderson_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_2957
PubMedSearch : Anderson_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_2957
PubMedID: 18263724
Gene_locus related to this paper: thepd-a1s004

Title : The complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam - Challacombe_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_3680
Author(s) : Challacombe JF , Altherr MR , Xie G , Bhotika SS , Brown N , Bruce D , Campbell CS , Campbell ML , Chen J , Chertkov O , Cleland C , Dimitrijevic M , Doggett NA , Fawcett JJ , Glavina T , Goodwin LA , Green LD , Han CS , Hill KK , Hitchcock P , Jackson PJ , Keim P , Kewalramani AR , Longmire J , Lucas S , Malfatti S , Martinez D , McMurry K , Meincke LJ , Misra M , Moseman BL , Mundt M , Munk AC , Okinaka RT , Parson-Quintana B , Reilly LP , Richardson P , Robinson DL , Saunders E , Tapia R , Tesmer JG , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Tice H , Ticknor LO , Wills PL , Gilna P , Brettin TS
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 189 :3680 , 2007
Abstract : Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that is widely used as a biopesticide (E. Schnepf, N. Crickmore, J. Van Rie, D. Lereclus, J. Baum, J. Feitelson, D. R. Zeigler, and D. H. Dean, Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 62:775-806, 1998). Here we report the finished, annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis Al Hakam, which was collected in Iraq by the United Nations Special Commission (L. Radnedge, P. Agron, K. Hill, P. Jackson, L. Ticknor, P. Keim, and G. Andersen, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:2755-2764, 2003).
ESTHER : Challacombe_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_3680
PubMedSearch : Challacombe_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_3680
PubMedID: 17337577
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacah-a0rcd1 , bacah-a0rer5 , bacah-a0rev7 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacc1-q73a27 , bacc1-q73c93 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx , bachk-q6hcl3 , bachk-q6hgn4 , bachk-q6hgp9 , bachk-q6hig3 , bachk-q6hit8

Title : Genome sequence of the cellulolytic gliding bacterium Cytophaga hutchinsonii - Xie_2007_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_73_3536
Author(s) : Xie G , Bruce DC , Challacombe JF , Chertkov O , Detter JC , Gilna P , Han CS , Lucas S , Misra M , Myers GL , Richardson P , Tapia R , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Brettin TS , Henrissat B , Wilson DB , McBride MJ
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 73 :3536 , 2007
Abstract : The complete DNA sequence of the aerobic cellulolytic soil bacterium Cytophaga hutchinsonii, which belongs to the phylum Bacteroidetes, is presented. The genome consists of a single, circular, 4.43-Mb chromosome containing 3,790 open reading frames, 1,986 of which have been assigned a tentative function. Two of the most striking characteristics of C. hutchinsonii are its rapid gliding motility over surfaces and its contact-dependent digestion of crystalline cellulose. The mechanism of C. hutchinsonii motility is not known, but its genome contains homologs for each of the gld genes that are required for gliding of the distantly related bacteroidete Flavobacterium johnsoniae. Cytophaga-Flavobacterium gliding appears to be novel and does not involve well-studied motility organelles such as flagella or type IV pili. Many genes thought to encode proteins involved in cellulose utilization were identified. These include candidate endo-beta-1,4-glucanases and beta-glucosidases. Surprisingly, obvious homologs of known cellobiohydrolases were not detected. Since such enzymes are needed for efficient cellulose digestion by well-studied cellulolytic bacteria, C. hutchinsonii either has novel cellobiohydrolases or has an unusual method of cellulose utilization. Genes encoding proteins with cohesin domains, which are characteristic of cellulosomes, were absent, but many proteins predicted to be involved in polysaccharide utilization had putative D5 domains, which are thought to be involved in anchoring proteins to the cell surface.
ESTHER : Xie_2007_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_73_3536
PubMedSearch : Xie_2007_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_73_3536
PubMedID: 17400776
Gene_locus related to this paper: cyth3-q11pu3 , cyth3-q11rb1 , cyth3-q11sp5 , cyth3-q11sp6 , cyth3-q11ty5 , cyth3-q11vh6 , cyth3-q11vj5 , cyth3-q11w17 , cyth3-q11xy0

Title : Pathogenomic sequence analysis of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates closely related to Bacillus anthracis - Han_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_3382
Author(s) : Han CS , Xie G , Challacombe JF , Altherr MR , Bhotika SS , Brown N , Bruce D , Campbell CS , Campbell ML , Chen J , Chertkov O , Cleland C , Dimitrijevic M , Doggett NA , Fawcett JJ , Glavina T , Goodwin LA , Green LD , Hill KK , Hitchcock P , Jackson PJ , Keim P , Kewalramani AR , Longmire J , Lucas S , Malfatti S , McMurry K , Meincke LJ , Misra M , Moseman BL , Mundt M , Munk AC , Okinaka RT , Parson-Quintana B , Reilly LP , Richardson P , Robinson DL , Rubin E , Saunders E , Tapia R , Tesmer JG , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Tice H , Ticknor LO , Wills PL , Brettin TS , Gilna P
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 188 :3382 , 2006
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis are closely related gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria of the B. cereus sensu lato group. While independently derived strains of B. anthracis reveal conspicuous sequence homogeneity, environmental isolates of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis exhibit extensive genetic diversity. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of the genomes of two members of the B. cereus group, B. thuringiensis 97-27 subsp. konkukian serotype H34, isolated from a necrotic human wound, and B. cereus E33L, which was isolated from a swab of a zebra carcass in Namibia. These two strains, when analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism within a collection of over 300 of B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis isolates, appear closely related to B. anthracis. The B. cereus E33L isolate appears to be the nearest relative to B. anthracis identified thus far. Whole-genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis 97-27and B. cereus E33L was undertaken to identify shared and unique genes among these isolates in comparison to the genomes of pathogenic strains B. anthracis Ames and B. cereus G9241 and nonpathogenic strains B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Comparison of these genomes revealed differences in terms of virulence, metabolic competence, structural components, and regulatory mechanisms.
ESTHER : Han_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_3382
PubMedSearch : Han_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_3382
PubMedID: 16621833
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA2607 , bacce-BC0968 , bacce-BC3133 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-c2mr40 , baccz-q63gk2

Title : The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16 - Martin_2004_Nature_432_988
Author(s) : Martin J , Han C , Gordon LA , Terry A , Prabhakar S , She X , Xie G , Hellsten U , Chan YM , Altherr M , Couronne O , Aerts A , Bajorek E , Black S , Blumer H , Branscomb E , Brown NC , Bruno WJ , Buckingham JM , Callen DF , Campbell CS , Campbell ML , Campbell EW , Caoile C , Challacombe JF , Chasteen LA , Chertkov O , Chi HC , Christensen M , Clark LM , Cohn JD , Denys M , Detter JC , Dickson M , Dimitrijevic-Bussod M , Escobar J , Fawcett JJ , Flowers D , Fotopulos D , Glavina T , Gomez M , Gonzales E , Goodstein D , Goodwin LA , Grady DL , Grigoriev I , Groza M , Hammon N , Hawkins T , Haydu L , Hildebrand CE , Huang W , Israni S , Jett J , Jewett PB , Kadner K , Kimball H , Kobayashi A , Krawczyk MC , Leyba T , Longmire JL , Lopez F , Lou Y , Lowry S , Ludeman T , Manohar CF , Mark GA , McMurray KL , Meincke LJ , Morgan J , Moyzis RK , Mundt MO , Munk AC , Nandkeshwar RD , Pitluck S , Pollard M , Predki P , Parson-Quintana B , Ramirez L , Rash S , Retterer J , Ricke DO , Robinson DL , Rodriguez A , Salamov A , Saunders EH , Scott D , Shough T , Stallings RL , Stalvey M , Sutherland RD , Tapia R , Tesmer JG , Thayer N , Thompson LS , Tice H , Torney DC , Tran-Gyamfi M , Tsai M , Ulanovsky LE , Ustaszewska A , Vo N , White PS , Williams AL , Wills PL , Wu JR , Wu K , Yang J , DeJong P , Bruce D , Doggett NA , Deaven L , Schmutz J , Grimwood J , Richardson P , Rokhsar DS , Eichler EE , Gilna P , Lucas SM , Myers RM , Rubin EM , Pennacchio LA
Ref : Nature , 432 :988 , 2004
Abstract : Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.
ESTHER : Martin_2004_Nature_432_988
PubMedSearch : Martin_2004_Nature_432_988
PubMedID: 15616553
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-CES1 , human-CES2 , human-CES3 , human-CES4A , human-CES5A