Fulton RS

References (15)

Title : The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes - Swart_2013_PLoS.Biol_11_e1001473
Author(s) : Swart EC , Bracht JR , Magrini V , Minx P , Chen X , Zhou Y , Khurana JS , Goldman AD , Nowacki M , Schotanus K , Jung S , Fulton RS , Ly A , McGrath S , Haub K , Wiggins JL , Storton D , Matese JC , Parsons L , Chang WJ , Bowen MS , Stover NA , Jones TA , Eddy SR , Herrick GA , Doak TG , Wilson RK , Mardis ER , Landweber LF
Ref : PLoS Biol , 11 :e1001473 , 2013
Abstract : The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction ( approximately 5%) of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes), have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of approximately 2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of approximately 16,000 complete nanochromosomes ( approximately 50 Mb haploid genome size) that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean approximately 3.2 kb) and encode approximately 18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes approximately 10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is approximately 4.0%), suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb) suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing studies of rearrangements arising during evolution and disease.
ESTHER : Swart_2013_PLoS.Biol_11_e1001473
PubMedSearch : Swart_2013_PLoS.Biol_11_e1001473
PubMedID: 23382650
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9spit-j9j7j1 , 9spit-j9hp22 , 9spit-j9ivu0

Title : Oil palm genome sequence reveals divergence of interfertile species in Old and New worlds - Singh_2013_Nature_500_335
Author(s) : Singh R , Ong-Abdullah M , Low ET , Manaf MA , Rosli R , Nookiah R , Ooi LC , Ooi SE , Chan KL , Halim MA , Azizi N , Nagappan J , Bacher B , Lakey N , Smith SW , He D , Hogan M , Budiman MA , Lee EK , Desalle R , Kudrna D , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Wilson RK , Fulton RS , Ordway JM , Martienssen RA , Sambanthamurthi R
Ref : Nature , 500 :335 , 2013
Abstract : Oil palm is the most productive oil-bearing crop. Although it is planted on only 5% of the total world vegetable oil acreage, palm oil accounts for 33% of vegetable oil and 45% of edible oil worldwide, but increased cultivation competes with dwindling rainforest reserves. We report the 1.8-gigabase (Gb) genome sequence of the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, the predominant source of worldwide oil production. A total of 1.535 Gb of assembled sequence and transcriptome data from 30 tissue types were used to predict at least 34,802 genes, including oil biosynthesis genes and homologues of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), and other transcriptional regulators, which are highly expressed in the kernel. We also report the draft sequence of the South American oil palm Elaeis oleifera, which has the same number of chromosomes (2n = 32) and produces fertile interspecific hybrids with E. guineensis but seems to have diverged in the New World. Segmental duplications of chromosome arms define the palaeotetraploid origin of palm trees. The oil palm sequence enables the discovery of genes for important traits as well as somaclonal epigenetic alterations that restrict the use of clones in commercial plantings, and should therefore help to achieve sustainability for biofuels and edible oils, reducing the rainforest footprint of this tropical plantation crop.
ESTHER : Singh_2013_Nature_500_335
PubMedSearch : Singh_2013_Nature_500_335
PubMedID: 23883927
Gene_locus related to this paper: elagv-a0a6i9rtu7 , elagv-a0a6i9set9

Title : The draft genome of the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis - Mitreva_2011_Nat.Genet_43_228
Author(s) : Mitreva M , Jasmer DP , Zarlenga DS , Wang Z , Abubucker S , Martin J , Taylor CM , Yin Y , Fulton L , Minx P , Yang SP , Warren WC , Fulton RS , Bhonagiri V , Zhang X , Hallsworth-Pepin K , Clifton SW , McCarter JP , Appleton J , Mardis ER , Wilson RK
Ref : Nat Genet , 43 :228 , 2011
Abstract : Genome evolution studies for the phylum Nematoda have been limited by focusing on comparisons involving Caenorhabditis elegans. We report a draft genome sequence of Trichinella spiralis, a food-borne zoonotic parasite, which is the most common cause of human trichinellosis. This parasitic nematode is an extant member of a clade that diverged early in the evolution of the phylum, enabling identification of archetypical genes and molecular signatures exclusive to nematodes. We sequenced the 64-Mb nuclear genome, which is estimated to contain 15,808 protein-coding genes, at approximately 35-fold coverage using whole-genome shotgun and hierarchal map-assisted sequencing. Comparative genome analyses support intrachromosomal rearrangements across the phylum, disproportionate numbers of protein family deaths over births in parasitic compared to a non-parasitic nematode and a preponderance of gene-loss and -gain events in nematodes relative to Drosophila melanogaster. This genome sequence and the identified pan-phylum characteristics will contribute to genome evolution studies of Nematoda as well as strategies to combat global parasites of humans, food animals and crops.
ESTHER : Mitreva_2011_Nat.Genet_43_228
PubMedSearch : Mitreva_2011_Nat.Genet_43_228
PubMedID: 21336279
Gene_locus related to this paper: trisp-ACHE1 , trisp-e5ryh1 , trisp-e5s2p1 , trisp-e5s3s1 , trisp-e5s5l6 , trisp-e5s7y8 , trisp-e5s8m6 , trisp-e5s9j3 , trisp-e5s254 , trisp-e5s773 , trisp-e5sav1 , trisp-e5sbp4 , trisp-e5sgg4 , trisp-e5sgu8 , trisp-e5snw0 , trisp-e5sr61 , trisp-e5ss42 , trisp-e5sgh2 , 9bila-a0a0v0tgw4.1 , 9bila-a0a0v0tws5

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx

Title : The B73 maize genome: complexity, diversity, and dynamics - Schnable_2009_Science_326_1112
Author(s) : Schnable PS , Ware D , Fulton RS , Stein JC , Wei F , Pasternak S , Liang C , Zhang J , Fulton L , Graves TA , Minx P , Reily AD , Courtney L , Kruchowski SS , Tomlinson C , Strong C , Delehaunty K , Fronick C , Courtney B , Rock SM , Belter E , Du F , Kim K , Abbott RM , Cotton M , Levy A , Marchetto P , Ochoa K , Jackson SM , Gillam B , Chen W , Yan L , Higginbotham J , Cardenas M , Waligorski J , Applebaum E , Phelps L , Falcone J , Kanchi K , Thane T , Scimone A , Thane N , Henke J , Wang T , Ruppert J , Shah N , Rotter K , Hodges J , Ingenthron E , Cordes M , Kohlberg S , Sgro J , Delgado B , Mead K , Chinwalla A , Leonard S , Crouse K , Collura K , Kudrna D , Currie J , He R , Angelova A , Rajasekar S , Mueller T , Lomeli R , Scara G , Ko A , Delaney K , Wissotski M , Lopez G , Campos D , Braidotti M , Ashley E , Golser W , Kim H , Lee S , Lin J , Dujmic Z , Kim W , Talag J , Zuccolo A , Fan C , Sebastian A , Kramer M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Zutavern T , Miller B , Ambroise C , Muller S , Spooner W , Narechania A , Ren L , Wei S , Kumari S , Faga B , Levy MJ , McMahan L , Van Buren P , Vaughn MW , Ying K , Yeh CT , Emrich SJ , Jia Y , Kalyanaraman A , Hsia AP , Barbazuk WB , Baucom RS , Brutnell TP , Carpita NC , Chaparro C , Chia JM , Deragon JM , Estill JC , Fu Y , Jeddeloh JA , Han Y , Lee H , Li P , Lisch DR , Liu S , Liu Z , Nagel DH , McCann MC , SanMiguel P , Myers AM , Nettleton D , Nguyen J , Penning BW , Ponnala L , Schneider KL , Schwartz DC , Sharma A , Soderlund C , Springer NM , Sun Q , Wang H , Waterman M , Westerman R , Wolfgruber TK , Yang L , Yu Y , Zhang L , Zhou S , Zhu Q , Bennetzen JL , Dawe RK , Jiang J , Jiang N , Presting GG , Wessler SR , Aluru S , Martienssen RA , Clifton SW , McCombie WR , Wing RA , Wilson RK
Ref : Science , 326 :1112 , 2009
Abstract : We report an improved draft nucleotide sequence of the 2.3-gigabase genome of maize, an important crop plant and model for biological research. Over 32,000 genes were predicted, of which 99.8% were placed on reference chromosomes. Nearly 85% of the genome is composed of hundreds of families of transposable elements, dispersed nonuniformly across the genome. These were responsible for the capture and amplification of numerous gene fragments and affect the composition, sizes, and positions of centromeres. We also report on the correlation of methylation-poor regions with Mu transposon insertions and recombination, and copy number variants with insertions and/or deletions, as well as how uneven gene losses between duplicated regions were involved in returning an ancient allotetraploid to a genetically diploid state. These analyses inform and set the stage for further investigations to improve our understanding of the domestication and agricultural improvements of maize.
ESTHER : Schnable_2009_Science_326_1112
PubMedSearch : Schnable_2009_Science_326_1112
PubMedID: 19965430
Gene_locus related to this paper: maize-b4ffc7 , maize-b6u7e1 , maize-c0pcy5 , maize-c0pgf7 , maize-c0pgw1 , maize-c0pfl3 , maize-b4fpr7 , maize-k7vy73 , maize-a0a096swr3 , maize-k7v3i9 , maize-b6u9v9 , maize-a0a3l6e780 , maize-b4fv80 , maize-a0a1d6nse2 , maize-c4j9a1 , maize-k7uba1

Title : Characterizing a model human gut microbiota composed of members of its two dominant bacterial phyla - Mahowald_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_5859
Author(s) : Mahowald MA , Rey FE , Seedorf H , Turnbaugh PJ , Fulton RS , Wollam A , Shah N , Wang C , Magrini V , Wilson RK , Cantarel BL , Coutinho PM , Henrissat B , Crock LW , Russell A , VerBerkmoes NC , Hettich RL , Gordon JI
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 106 :5859 , 2009
Abstract : The adult human distal gut microbial community is typically dominated by 2 bacterial phyla (divisions), the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes. Little is known about the factors that govern the interactions between their members. Here, we examine the niches of representatives of both phyla in vivo. Finished genome sequences were generated from Eubacterium rectale and E. eligens, which belong to Clostridium Cluster XIVa, one of the most common gut Firmicute clades. Comparison of these and 25 other gut Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes indicated that the Firmicutes possess smaller genomes and a disproportionately smaller number of glycan-degrading enzymes. Germ-free mice were then colonized with E. rectale and/or a prominent human gut Bacteroidetes, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, followed by whole-genome transcriptional profiling, high-resolution proteomic analysis, and biochemical assays of microbial-microbial and microbial-host interactions. B. thetaiotaomicron adapts to E. rectale by up-regulating expression of a variety of polysaccharide utilization loci encoding numerous glycoside hydrolases, and by signaling the host to produce mucosal glycans that it, but not E. rectale, can access. E. rectale adapts to B. thetaiotaomicron by decreasing production of its glycan-degrading enzymes, increasing expression of selected amino acid and sugar transporters, and facilitating glycolysis by reducing levels of NADH, in part via generation of butyrate from acetate, which in turn is used by the gut epithelium. This simplified model of the human gut microbiota illustrates niche specialization and functional redundancy within members of its major bacterial phyla, and the importance of host glycans as a nutrient foundation that ensures ecosystem stability.
ESTHER : Mahowald_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_5859
PubMedSearch : Mahowald_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_5859
PubMedID: 19321416
Gene_locus related to this paper: eube2-c4z2j4 , eube2-c4z5d5 , eube2-c4z6k4 , eube2-c4z179 , eube2-c4z180 , eubr3-c4z8a6 , eubr3-c4zfm2 , eubr3-c4zhp3 , eubr3-c4zf28

Title : Comparative genomics of protoploid Saccharomycetaceae - Souciet_2009_Genome.Res_19_1696
Author(s) : Souciet JL , Dujon B , Gaillardin C , Johnston M , Baret PV , Cliften P , Sherman DJ , Weissenbach J , Westhof E , Wincker P , Jubin C , Poulain J , Barbe V , Segurens B , Artiguenave F , Anthouard V , Vacherie B , Val ME , Fulton RS , Minx P , Wilson R , Durrens P , Jean G , Marck C , Martin T , Nikolski M , Rolland T , Seret ML , Casaregola S , Despons L , Fairhead C , Fischer G , Lafontaine I , Leh V , Lemaire M , De Montigny J , Neuveglise C , Thierry A , Blanc-Lenfle I , Bleykasten C , Diffels J , Fritsch E , Frangeul L , Goeffon A , Jauniaux N , Kachouri-Lafond R , Payen C , Potier S , Pribylova L , Ozanne C , Richard GF , Sacerdot C , Straub ML , Talla E
Ref : Genome Res , 19 :1696 , 2009
Abstract : Our knowledge of yeast genomes remains largely dominated by the extensive studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the consequences of its ancestral duplication, leaving the evolution of the entire class of hemiascomycetes only partly explored. We concentrate here on five species of Saccharomycetaceae, a large subdivision of hemiascomycetes, that we call "protoploid" because they diverged from the S. cerevisiae lineage prior to its genome duplication. We determined the complete genome sequences of three of these species: Kluyveromyces (Lachancea) thermotolerans and Saccharomyces (Lachancea) kluyveri (two members of the newly described Lachancea clade), and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. We included in our comparisons the previously available sequences of Kluyveromyces lactis and Ashbya (Eremothecium) gossypii. Despite their broad evolutionary range and significant individual variations in each lineage, the five protoploid Saccharomycetaceae share a core repertoire of approximately 3300 protein families and a high degree of conserved synteny. Synteny blocks were used to define gene orthology and to infer ancestors. Far from representing minimal genomes without redundancy, the five protoploid yeasts contain numerous copies of paralogous genes, either dispersed or in tandem arrays, that, altogether, constitute a third of each genome. Ancient, conserved paralogs as well as novel, lineage-specific paralogs were identified.
ESTHER : Souciet_2009_Genome.Res_19_1696
PubMedSearch : Souciet_2009_Genome.Res_19_1696
PubMedID: 19525356
Gene_locus related to this paper: lactc-c5dci9 , lactc-c5ddi5 , lactc-c5dew5 , lactc-c5dez1 , lactc-c5df11 , lactc-c5dfh7 , lactc-c5dgd1 , lactc-c5dif7 , lactc-c5din7 , lactc-c5dja0 , lactc-c5dm95 , lactc-c5dn06 , lactc-c5dnn9 , lactc-c5e2g8 , lactc-c5e3n5 , lactc-c5e375 , zygrc-c5drr0 , zygrc-c5dvh0 , zygrc-c5dvl2 , zygrc-c5dvx0 , zygrc-c5dvz8 , zygrc-c5dx83 , zygrc-c5dxn5 , zygrc-c5dxq9 , zygrc-c5e0w1 , zygrc-c5e1e4 , zygrc-c5e1h2 , zygro-a0a1q2zt01 , 9sach-a0a0p1kuu1 , lactc-kex1 , zygrc-kex1

Title : The genome of Cyanothece 51142, a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium important in the marine nitrogen cycle - Welsh_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_15094
Author(s) : Welsh EA , Liberton M , Stockel J , Loh T , Elvitigala T , Wang C , Wollam A , Fulton RS , Clifton SW , Jacobs JM , Aurora R , Ghosh BK , Sherman LA , Smith RD , Wilson RK , Pakrasi HB
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 105 :15094 , 2008
Abstract : Unicellular cyanobacteria have recently been recognized for their contributions to nitrogen fixation in marine environments, a function previously thought to be filled mainly by filamentous cyanobacteria such as Trichodesmium. To begin a systems level analysis of the physiology of the unicellular N(2)-fixing microbes, we have sequenced to completion the genome of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, the first such organism. Cyanothece 51142 performs oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, separating these two incompatible processes temporally within the same cell, while concomitantly accumulating metabolic products in inclusion bodies that are later mobilized as part of a robust diurnal cycle. The 5,460,377-bp Cyanothece 51142 genome has a unique arrangement of one large circular chromosome, four small plasmids, and one linear chromosome, the first report of a linear element in the genome of a photosynthetic bacterium. On the 429,701-bp linear chromosome is a cluster of genes for enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism, suggesting an important role for the linear chromosome in fermentative processes. The annotation of the genome was significantly aided by simultaneous global proteomic studies of this organism. Compared with other nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, Cyanothece 51142 contains the largest intact contiguous cluster of nitrogen fixation-related genes. We discuss the implications of such an organization on the regulation of nitrogen fixation. The genome sequence provides important information regarding the ability of Cyanothece 51142 to accomplish metabolic compartmentalization and energy storage, as well as how a unicellular bacterium balances multiple, often incompatible, processes in a single cell.
ESTHER : Welsh_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_15094
PubMedSearch : Welsh_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_15094
PubMedID: 18812508
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9chro-a3ivg5 , cyaa5-b1wnj9 , cyaa5-b1wp98 , cyaa5-b1wq26 , cyaa5-b1wra6 , cyaa5-b1wrh9 , cyaa5-b1wrp1 , cyaa5-b1wt43 , cyaa5-b1wuj8 , cyaa5-b1wuq3 , cyaa5-b1wvl2 , cyaa5-b1wwy9 , cyaa5-b1wxa5 , cyaa5-b1wxy0 , cyaa5-b1wyh5 , cyaa5-b1wzi4 , cyaa5-b1x044 , cyaa5-b1x046 , cyaa5-b1x242 , cyaa5-b1x271 , cyaa5-b1wzg4 , cyaa5-b1x2s9

Title : Evolution of symbiotic bacteria in the distal human intestine - Xu_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e156
Author(s) : Xu J , Mahowald MA , Ley RE , Lozupone CA , Hamady M , Martens EC , Henrissat B , Coutinho PM , Minx P , Latreille P , Cordum H , Van Brunt A , Kim K , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Clifton SW , Wilson RK , Knight RD , Gordon JI
Ref : PLoS Biol , 5 :e156 , 2007
Abstract : The adult human intestine contains trillions of bacteria, representing hundreds of species and thousands of subspecies. Little is known about the selective pressures that have shaped and are shaping this community's component species, which are dominated by members of the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes divisions. To examine how the intestinal environment affects microbial genome evolution, we have sequenced the genomes of two members of the normal distal human gut microbiota, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides distasonis, and by comparison with the few other sequenced gut and non-gut Bacteroidetes, analyzed their niche and habitat adaptations. The results show that lateral gene transfer, mobile elements, and gene amplification have played important roles in affecting the ability of gut-dwelling Bacteroidetes to vary their cell surface, sense their environment, and harvest nutrient resources present in the distal intestine. Our findings show that these processes have been a driving force in the adaptation of Bacteroidetes to the distal gut environment, and emphasize the importance of considering the evolution of humans from an additional perspective, namely the evolution of our microbiomes.
ESTHER : Xu_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e156
PubMedSearch : Xu_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e156
PubMedID: 17579514
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9bace-b6w170 , 9bace-c6z6f2 , 9bace-e1z049 , 9porp-c7xbp3 , 9porp-c7xci2 , 9porp-c7xdx2 , bacv8-a6kwf6 , bacv8-a6kzc1 , bacv8-a6kze8 , bacv8-a6l0d9 , bacv8-a6l1d0 , bacv8-a6l1u9 , bacv8-a6l7p9 , bacv8-a6l7w1 , bacv8-a6l018 , bacv8-a6l378 , bacv8-a6l415 , bacv8-a6l715 , pard8-a6lc23 , pard8-a6lca7 , pard8-a6ld87 , pard8-a6le10 , pard8-a6le63 , pard8-a6lfj2 , pard8-a6lgh2 , pard8-a6lgi6 , pard8-a6lgn7 , pard8-a6lhe1 , pard8-a6li91 , bacv8-a6l3w9

Title : The complete genome sequence of a chronic atrophic gastritis Helicobacter pylori strain: evolution during disease progression - Oh_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_9999
Author(s) : Oh JD , Kling-Backhed H , Giannakis M , Xu J , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Cordum HS , Wang C , Elliott G , Edwards J , Mardis ER , Engstrand LG , Gordon JI
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 103 :9999 , 2006
Abstract : Helicobacter pylori produces acute superficial gastritis in nearly all of its human hosts. However, a subset of individuals develops chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG), a condition characterized in part by diminished numbers of acid-producing parietal cells and increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Previously, we used a gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model with an engineered ablation of parietal cells to show that loss of parietal cells provides an opportunity for a H. pylori isolate from a patient with ChAG (HPAG1) to bind to, enter, and persist within gastric stem cells. This finding raises the question of how ChAG influences H. pylori genome evolution, physiology, and tumorigenesis. Here we describe the 1,596,366-bp HPAG1 genome. Custom HPAG1 Affymetrix GeneChips, representing 99.6% of its predicted ORFs, were used for whole-genome genotyping of additional H. pylori ChAG isolates obtained from Swedish patients enrolled in a case-control study of gastric cancer, as well as ChAG- and cancer-associated isolates from an individual who progressed from ChAG to gastric adenocarcinoma. The results reveal a shared gene signature among ChAG strains, as well as genes that may have been lost or gained during progression to adenocarcinoma. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling of HPAG1's response to acid during in vitro growth indicates that genes encoding components of metal uptake and utilization pathways, outer membrane proteins, and virulence factors are among those associated with H. pylori's adaptation to ChAG.
ESTHER : Oh_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_9999
PubMedSearch : Oh_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_9999
PubMedID: 16788065
Gene_locus related to this paper: helpy-o25061

Title : Identification of genes subject to positive selection in uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli: a comparative genomics approach - Chen_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_5977
Author(s) : Chen SL , Hung CS , Xu J , Reigstad CS , Magrini V , Sabo A , Blasiar D , Bieri T , Meyer RR , Ozersky P , Armstrong JR , Fulton RS , Latreille JP , Spieth J , Hooton TM , Mardis ER , Hultgren SJ , Gordon JI
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 103 :5977 , 2006
Abstract : Escherichia coli is a model laboratory bacterium, a species that is widely distributed in the environment, as well as a mutualist and pathogen in its human hosts. As such, E. coli represents an attractive organism to study how environment impacts microbial genome structure and function. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) must adapt to life in several microbial communities in the human body, and has a complex life cycle in the bladder when it causes acute or recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Several studies designed to identify virulence factors have focused on genes that are uniquely represented in UPEC strains, whereas the role of genes that are common to all E. coli has received much less attention. Here we describe the complete 5,065,741-bp genome sequence of a UPEC strain recovered from a patient with an acute bladder infection and compare it with six other finished E. coli genome sequences. We searched 3,470 ortholog sets for genes that are under positive selection only in UPEC strains. Our maximum likelihood-based analysis yielded 29 genes involved in various aspects of cell surface structure, DNA metabolism, nutrient acquisition, and UTI. These results were validated by resequencing a subset of the 29 genes in a panel of 50 urinary, periurethral, and rectal E. coli isolates from patients with UTI. These studies outline a computational approach that may be broadly applicable for studying strain-specific adaptation and pathogenesis in other bacteria.
ESTHER : Chen_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_5977
PubMedSearch : Chen_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_5977
PubMedID: 16585510
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-Aes , ecoli-rutD , ecoli-bioh , ecoli-C0410 , ecoli-C2429 , ecoli-C2451 , ecoli-C4836 , ecoli-dlhh , ecoli-entf , ecoli-fes , ecoli-IROD , ecoli-IROE , ecoli-pldb , ecoli-ptrb , ecoli-yafa , ecoli-yaim , ecoli-ybff , ecoli-ycfp , ecoli-ycjy , ecoli-yeiG , ecoli-YFBB , ecoli-yghX , ecoli-yhet , ecoli-yiel , ecoli-yjfp , ecoli-YNBC , ecoli-ypfh , ecoli-ypt1 , ecoli-yqia , ecoli-YfhR , ecout-q1r7l6 , yerpe-YBTT

Title : Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4 - Hillier_2005_Nature_434_724
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Graves TA , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Pepin KH , Minx P , Wagner-McPherson C , Layman D , Wylie K , Sekhon M , Becker MC , Fewell GA , Delehaunty KD , Miner TL , Nash WE , Kremitzki C , Oddy L , Du H , Sun H , Bradshaw-Cordum H , Ali J , Carter J , Cordes M , Harris A , Isak A , Van Brunt A , Nguyen C , Du F , Courtney L , Kalicki J , Ozersky P , Abbott S , Armstrong J , Belter EA , Caruso L , Cedroni M , Cotton M , Davidson T , Desai A , Elliott G , Erb T , Fronick C , Gaige T , Haakenson W , Haglund K , Holmes A , Harkins R , Kim K , Kruchowski SS , Strong CM , Grewal N , Goyea E , Hou S , Levy A , Martinka S , Mead K , McLellan MD , Meyer R , Randall-Maher J , Tomlinson C , Dauphin-Kohlberg S , Kozlowicz-Reilly A , Shah N , Swearengen-Shahid S , Snider J , Strong JT , Thompson J , Yoakum M , Leonard S , Pearman C , Trani L , Radionenko M , Waligorski JE , Wang C , Rock SM , Tin-Wollam AM , Maupin R , Latreille P , Wendl MC , Yang SP , Pohl C , Wallis JW , Spieth J , Bieri TA , Berkowicz N , Nelson JO , Osborne J , Ding L , Sabo A , Shotland Y , Sinha P , Wohldmann PE , Cook LL , Hickenbotham MT , Eldred J , Williams D , Jones TA , She X , Ciccarelli FD , Izaurralde E , Taylor J , Schmutz J , Myers RM , Cox DR , Huang X , McPherson JD , Mardis ER , Clifton SW , Warren WC , Chinwalla AT , Eddy SR , Marra MA , Ovcharenko I , Furey TS , Miller W , Eichler EE , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Waterston RH , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 434 :724 , 2005
Abstract : Human chromosome 2 is unique to the human lineage in being the product of a head-to-head fusion of two intermediate-sized ancestral chromosomes. Chromosome 4 has received attention primarily related to the search for the Huntington's disease gene, but also for genes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, polycystic kidney disease and a form of muscular dystrophy. Here we present approximately 237 million base pairs of sequence for chromosome 2, and 186 million base pairs for chromosome 4, representing more than 99.6% of their euchromatic sequences. Our initial analyses have identified 1,346 protein-coding genes and 1,239 pseudogenes on chromosome 2, and 796 protein-coding genes and 778 pseudogenes on chromosome 4. Extensive analyses confirm the underlying construction of the sequence, and expand our understanding of the structure and evolution of mammalian chromosomes, including gene deserts, segmental duplications and highly variant regions.
ESTHER : Hillier_2005_Nature_434_724
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2005_Nature_434_724
PubMedID: 15815621
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD1 , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-KANSL3 , human-PGAP1 , human-PREPL

Title : The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome - Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
Author(s) : Ross MT , Grafham DV , Coffey AJ , Scherer S , McLay K , Muzny D , Platzer M , Howell GR , Burrows C , Bird CP , Frankish A , Lovell FL , Howe KL , Ashurst JL , Fulton RS , Sudbrak R , Wen G , Jones MC , Hurles ME , Andrews TD , Scott CE , Searle S , Ramser J , Whittaker A , Deadman R , Carter NP , Hunt SE , Chen R , Cree A , Gunaratne P , Havlak P , Hodgson A , Metzker ML , Richards S , Scott G , Steffen D , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Ainscough R , Ambrose KD , Ansari-Lari MA , Aradhya S , Ashwell RI , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Ballabio A , Banerjee R , Barker GE , Barlow KF , Barrett IP , Bates KN , Beare DM , Beasley H , Beasley O , Beck A , Bethel G , Blechschmidt K , Brady N , Bray-Allen S , Bridgeman AM , Brown AJ , Brown MJ , Bonnin D , Bruford EA , Buhay C , Burch P , Burford D , Burgess J , Burrill W , Burton J , Bye JM , Carder C , Carrel L , Chako J , Chapman JC , Chavez D , Chen E , Chen G , Chen Y , Chen Z , Chinault C , Ciccodicola A , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee CM , Clegg S , Clerc-Blankenburg K , Clifford K , Cobley V , Cole CG , Conquer JS , Corby N , Connor RE , David R , Davies J , Davis C , Davis J , Delgado O , Deshazo D , Dhami P , Ding Y , Dinh H , Dodsworth S , Draper H , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunham A , Dunn M , Durbin KJ , Dutta I , Eades T , Ellwood M , Emery-Cohen A , Errington H , Evans KL , Faulkner L , Francis F , Frankland J , Fraser AE , Galgoczy P , Gilbert J , Gill R , Glockner G , Gregory SG , Gribble S , Griffiths C , Grocock R , Gu Y , Gwilliam R , Hamilton C , Hart EA , Hawes A , Heath PD , Heitmann K , Hennig S , Hernandez J , Hinzmann B , Ho S , Hoffs M , Howden PJ , Huckle EJ , Hume J , Hunt PJ , Hunt AR , Isherwood J , Jacob L , Johnson D , Jones S , de Jong PJ , Joseph SS , Keenan S , Kelly S , Kershaw JK , Khan Z , Kioschis P , Klages S , Knights AJ , Kosiura A , Kovar-Smith C , Laird GK , Langford C , Lawlor S , Leversha M , Lewis L , Liu W , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Loulseged H , Loveland JE , Lovell JD , Lozado R , Lu J , Lyne R , Ma J , Maheshwari M , Matthews LH , McDowall J , Mclaren S , McMurray A , Meidl P , Meitinger T , Milne S , Miner G , Mistry SL , Morgan M , Morris S , Muller I , Mullikin JC , Nguyen N , Nordsiek G , Nyakatura G , O'Dell CN , Okwuonu G , Palmer S , Pandian R , Parker D , Parrish J , Pasternak S , Patel D , Pearce AV , Pearson DM , Pelan SE , Perez L , Porter KM , Ramsey Y , Reichwald K , Rhodes S , Ridler KA , Schlessinger D , Schueler MG , Sehra HK , Shaw-Smith C , Shen H , Sheridan EM , Shownkeen R , Skuce CD , Smith ML , Sotheran EC , Steingruber HE , Steward CA , Storey R , Swann RM , Swarbreck D , Tabor PE , Taudien S , Taylor T , Teague B , Thomas K , Thorpe A , Timms K , Tracey A , Trevanion S , Tromans AC , d'Urso M , Verduzco D , Villasana D , Waldron L , Wall M , Wang Q , Warren J , Warry GL , Wei X , West A , Whitehead SL , Whiteley MN , Wilkinson JE , Willey DL , Williams G , Williams L , Williamson A , Williamson H , Wilming L , Woodmansey RL , Wray PW , Yen J , Zhang J , Zhou J , Zoghbi H , Zorilla S , Buck D , Reinhardt R , Poustka A , Rosenthal A , Lehrach H , Meindl A , Minx PJ , Hillier LW , Willard HF , Wilson RK , Waterston RH , Rice CM , Vaudin M , Coulson A , Nelson DL , Weinstock G , Sulston JE , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Gibbs RA , Beck S , Rogers J , Bentley DR
Ref : Nature , 434 :325 , 2005
Abstract : The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
ESTHER : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedSearch : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedID: 15772651
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X

Title : Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution - Hillier_2004_Nature_432_695
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Miller W , Birney E , Warren W , Hardison RC , Ponting CP , Bork P , Burt DW , Groenen MA , Delany ME , Dodgson JB , Chinwalla AT , Cliften PF , Clifton SW , Delehaunty KD , Fronick C , Fulton RS , Graves TA , Kremitzki C , Layman D , Magrini V , McPherson JD , Miner TL , Minx P , Nash WE , Nhan MN , Nelson JO , Oddy LG , Pohl CS , Randall-Maher J , Smith SM , Wallis JW , Yang SP , Romanov MN , Rondelli CM , Paton B , Smith J , Morrice D , Daniels L , Tempest HG , Robertson L , Masabanda JS , Griffin DK , Vignal A , Fillon V , Jacobbson L , Kerje S , Andersson L , Crooijmans RP , Aerts J , van der Poel JJ , Ellegren H , Caldwell RB , Hubbard SJ , Grafham DV , Kierzek AM , McLaren SR , Overton IM , Arakawa H , Beattie KJ , Bezzubov Y , Boardman PE , Bonfield JK , Croning MD , Davies RM , Francis MD , Humphray SJ , Scott CE , Taylor RG , Tickle C , Brown WR , Rogers J , Buerstedde JM , Wilson SA , Stubbs L , Ovcharenko I , Gordon L , Lucas S , Miller MM , Inoko H , Shiina T , Kaufman J , Salomonsen J , Skjoedt K , Ka-Shu Wong G , Wang J , Liu B , Yu J , Yang H , Nefedov M , Koriabine M , deJong PJ , Goodstadt L , Webber C , Dickens NJ , Letunic I , Suyama M , Torrents D , von Mering C , Zdobnov EM , Makova K , Nekrutenko A , Elnitski L , Eswara P , King DC , Yang S , Tyekucheva S , Radakrishnan A , Harris RS , Chiaromonte F , Taylor J , He J , Rijnkels M , Griffiths-Jones S , Ureta-Vidal A , Hoffman MM , Severin J , Searle SM , Law AS , Speed D , Waddington D , Cheng Z , Tuzun E , Eichler E , Bao Z , Flicek P , Shteynberg DD , Brent MR , Bye JM , Huckle EJ , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Kouranov A , Mourelatos Z , Hatzigeorgiou AG , Paterson AH , Ivarie R , Brandstrom M , Axelsson E , Backstrom N , Berlin S , Webster MT , Pourquie O , Reymond A , Ucla C , Antonarakis SE , Long M , Emerson JJ , Betran E , Dupanloup I , Kaessmann H , Hinrichs AS , Bejerano G , Furey TS , Harte RA , Raney B , Siepel A , Kent WJ , Haussler D , Eyras E , Castelo R , Abril JF , Castellano S , Camara F , Parra G , Guigo R , Bourque G , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Smit A , Fulton LA , Mardis ER , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 432 :695 , 2004
Abstract : We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance between chicken and human provides high specificity in detecting functional elements, both non-coding and coding. Notably, many conserved non-coding sequences are far from genes and cannot be assigned to defined functional classes. In coding regions the evolutionary dynamics of protein domains and orthologous groups illustrate processes that distinguish the lineages leading to birds and mammals. The distinctive properties of avian microchromosomes, together with the inferred patterns of conserved synteny, provide additional insights into vertebrate chromosome architecture.
ESTHER : Hillier_2004_Nature_432_695
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2004_Nature_432_695
PubMedID: 15592404
Gene_locus related to this paper: chick-a0a1d5pmd9 , chick-b3tzb3 , chick-BCHE , chick-cb043 , chick-d3wgl5 , chick-e1bsm0 , chick-e1bvq6 , chick-e1bwz0 , chick-e1bwz1 , chick-e1byn1 , chick-e1bz81 , chick-e1c0z8 , chick-e1c7p7 , chick-f1nby4 , chick-f1ncz8 , chick-f1ndp3 , chick-f1nep4 , chick-f1nj68 , chick-f1njg6 , chick-f1njk4 , chick-f1njs4 , chick-f1njs5 , chick-f1nk87 , chick-f1nmx9 , chick-f1ntp8 , chick-f1nvg7 , chick-f1nwf2 , chick-f1p1l1 , chick-f1p3j5 , chick-f1p4c6 , chick-f1p508 , chick-fas , chick-h9l0k6 , chick-nlgn1 , chick-NLGN3 , chick-q5f3h8 , chick-q5zhm0 , chick-q5zi81 , chick-q5zij5 , chick-q5zin0 , chick-thyro , chick-f1nrq2 , chick-e1byd4 , chick-e1c2h6 , chick-a0a1d5pk92 , chick-a0a1d5pzg7 , chick-f1nbc2 , chick-f1nf25 , chick-f1nly5 , chick-f1p4h5 , chick-f1nzi7 , chick-f1p5k3 , chick-f1nm35 , chick-a0a1d5pl11 , chick-a0a1d5pj73 , chick-f1nxu6 , chick-a0a1d5nwc0 , chick-e1bxs8 , chick-f1p2g7 , chick-f1nd96

Title : The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7 - Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
Author(s) : Hillier LW , Fulton RS , Fulton LA , Graves TA , Pepin KH , Wagner-McPherson C , Layman D , Maas J , Jaeger S , Walker R , Wylie K , Sekhon M , Becker MC , O'Laughlin MD , Schaller ME , Fewell GA , Delehaunty KD , Miner TL , Nash WE , Cordes M , Du H , Sun H , Edwards J , Bradshaw-Cordum H , Ali J , Andrews S , Isak A , Vanbrunt A , Nguyen C , Du F , Lamar B , Courtney L , Kalicki J , Ozersky P , Bielicki L , Scott K , Holmes A , Harkins R , Harris A , Strong CM , Hou S , Tomlinson C , Dauphin-Kohlberg S , Kozlowicz-Reilly A , Leonard S , Rohlfing T , Rock SM , Tin-Wollam AM , Abbott A , Minx P , Maupin R , Strowmatt C , Latreille P , Miller N , Johnson D , Murray J , Woessner JP , Wendl MC , Yang SP , Schultz BR , Wallis JW , Spieth J , Bieri TA , Nelson JO , Berkowicz N , Wohldmann PE , Cook LL , Hickenbotham MT , Eldred J , Williams D , Bedell JA , Mardis ER , Clifton SW , Chissoe SL , Marra MA , Raymond C , Haugen E , Gillett W , Zhou Y , James R , Phelps K , Iadanoto S , Bubb K , Simms E , Levy R , Clendenning J , Kaul R , Kent WJ , Furey TS , Baertsch RA , Brent MR , Keibler E , Flicek P , Bork P , Suyama M , Bailey JA , Portnoy ME , Torrents D , Chinwalla AT , Gish WR , Eddy SR , McPherson JD , Olson MV , Eichler EE , Green ED , Waterston RH , Wilson RK
Ref : Nature , 424 :157 , 2003
Abstract : Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame.
ESTHER : Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
PubMedSearch : Hillier_2003_Nature_424_157
PubMedID: 12853948
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-CPVL , human-DPP6 , human-MEST