Bharti AK

References (4)

Title : Algal genomes reveal evolutionary mosaicism and the fate of nucleomorphs - Curtis_2012_Nature_492_59
Author(s) : Curtis BA , Tanifuji G , Burki F , Gruber A , Irimia M , Maruyama S , Arias MC , Ball SG , Gile GH , Hirakawa Y , Hopkins JF , Kuo A , Rensing SA , Schmutz J , Symeonidi A , Elias M , Eveleigh RJ , Herman EK , Klute MJ , Nakayama T , Obornik M , Reyes-Prieto A , Armbrust EV , Aves SJ , Beiko RG , Coutinho P , Dacks JB , Durnford DG , Fast NM , Green BR , Grisdale CJ , Hempel F , Henrissat B , Hoppner MP , Ishida K , Kim E , Koreny L , Kroth PG , Liu Y , Malik SB , Maier UG , McRose D , Mock T , Neilson JA , Onodera NT , Poole AM , Pritham EJ , Richards TA , Rocap G , Roy SW , Sarai C , Schaack S , Shirato S , Slamovits CH , Spencer DF , Suzuki S , Worden AZ , Zauner S , Barry K , Bell C , Bharti AK , Crow JA , Grimwood J , Kramer R , Lindquist E , Lucas S , Salamov A , McFadden GI , Lane CE , Keeling PJ , Gray MW , Grigoriev IV , Archibald JM
Ref : Nature , 492 :59 , 2012
Abstract : Cryptophyte and chlorarachniophyte algae are transitional forms in the widespread secondary endosymbiotic acquisition of photosynthesis by engulfment of eukaryotic algae. Unlike most secondary plastid-bearing algae, miniaturized versions of the endosymbiont nuclei (nucleomorphs) persist in cryptophytes and chlorarachniophytes. To determine why, and to address other fundamental questions about eukaryote-eukaryote endosymbiosis, we sequenced the nuclear genomes of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta and the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans. Both genomes have >21,000 protein genes and are intron rich, and B. natans exhibits unprecedented alternative splicing for a single-celled organism. Phylogenomic analyses and subcellular targeting predictions reveal extensive genetic and biochemical mosaicism, with both host- and endosymbiont-derived genes servicing the mitochondrion, the host cell cytosol, the plastid and the remnant endosymbiont cytosol of both algae. Mitochondrion-to-nucleus gene transfer still occurs in both organisms but plastid-to-nucleus and nucleomorph-to-nucleus transfers do not, which explains why a small residue of essential genes remains locked in each nucleomorph.
ESTHER : Curtis_2012_Nature_492_59
PubMedSearch : Curtis_2012_Nature_492_59
PubMedID: 23201678
Gene_locus related to this paper: guith-l1i9i5 , guith-l1k167 , guitc-l1jmn9

Title : Draft genome sequence of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan), an orphan legume crop of resource-poor farmers - Varshney_2011_Nat.Biotechnol_30_83
Author(s) : Varshney RK , Chen W , Li Y , Bharti AK , Saxena RK , Schlueter JA , Donoghue MT , Azam S , Fan G , Whaley AM , Farmer AD , Sheridan J , Iwata A , Tuteja R , Penmetsa RV , Wu W , Upadhyaya HD , Yang SP , Shah T , Saxena KB , Michael T , McCombie WR , Yang B , Zhang G , Yang H , Wang J , Spillane C , Cook DR , May GD , Xu X , Jackson SA
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 30 :83 , 2011
Abstract : Pigeonpea is an important legume food crop grown primarily by smallholder farmers in many semi-arid tropical regions of the world. We used the Illumina next-generation sequencing platform to generate 237.2 Gb of sequence, which along with Sanger-based bacterial artificial chromosome end sequences and a genetic map, we assembled into scaffolds representing 72.7% (605.78 Mb) of the 833.07 Mb pigeonpea genome. Genome analysis predicted 48,680 genes for pigeonpea and also showed the potential role that certain gene families, for example, drought tolerance-related genes, have played throughout the domestication of pigeonpea and the evolution of its ancestors. Although we found a few segmental duplication events, we did not observe the recent genome-wide duplication events observed in soybean. This reference genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of agronomically important traits, and accelerate the development of improved pigeonpea varieties that could improve food security in many developing countries.
ESTHER : Varshney_2011_Nat.Biotechnol_30_83
PubMedSearch : Varshney_2011_Nat.Biotechnol_30_83
PubMedID: 22057054
Gene_locus related to this paper: cajca-a0a151r9d2 , cajca-a0a151u2m0 , cajca-a0a151tes0 , cajca-a0a151u784 , cajca-a0a151sf79 , cajca-a0a151qu18 , cajca-a0a151sz37 , cajca-a0a151ss18 , cajca-a0a151rb44 , cajca-a0a151ryr0 , cajca-a0a151qzm6 , cajca-a0a151rsm6 , cajca-a0a151rsn1 , cajca-a0a151tig2 , cajca-a0a151rwt3 , cajca-a0a151rx08 , cajca-a0a151rws4 , cajca-a0a151r0b7

Title : The Medicago genome provides insight into the evolution of rhizobial symbioses - Young_2011_Nature_480_520
Author(s) : Young ND , Debelle F , Oldroyd GE , Geurts R , Cannon SB , Udvardi MK , Benedito VA , Mayer KF , Gouzy J , Schoof H , Van de Peer Y , Proost S , Cook DR , Meyers BC , Spannagl M , Cheung F , De Mita S , Krishnakumar V , Gundlach H , Zhou S , Mudge J , Bharti AK , Murray JD , Naoumkina MA , Rosen B , Silverstein KA , Tang H , Rombauts S , Zhao PX , Zhou P , Barbe V , Bardou P , Bechner M , Bellec A , Berger A , Berges H , Bidwell S , Bisseling T , Choisne N , Couloux A , Denny R , Deshpande S , Dai X , Doyle JJ , Dudez AM , Farmer AD , Fouteau S , Franken C , Gibelin C , Gish J , Goldstein S , Gonzalez AJ , Green PJ , Hallab A , Hartog M , Hua A , Humphray SJ , Jeong DH , Jing Y , Jocker A , Kenton SM , Kim DJ , Klee K , Lai H , Lang C , Lin S , Macmil SL , Magdelenat G , Matthews L , McCorrison J , Monaghan EL , Mun JH , Najar FZ , Nicholson C , Noirot C , O'Bleness M , Paule CR , Poulain J , Prion F , Qin B , Qu C , Retzel EF , Riddle C , Sallet E , Samain S , Samson N , Sanders I , Saurat O , Scarpelli C , Schiex T , Segurens B , Severin AJ , Sherrier DJ , Shi R , Sims S , Singer SR , Sinharoy S , Sterck L , Viollet A , Wang BB , Wang K , Wang M , Wang X , Warfsmann J , Weissenbach J , White DD , White JD , Wiley GB , Wincker P , Xing Y , Yang L , Yao Z , Ying F , Zhai J , Zhou L , Zuber A , Denarie J , Dixon RA , May GD , Schwartz DC , Rogers J , Quetier F , Town CD , Roe BA
Ref : Nature , 480 :520 , 2011
Abstract : Legumes (Fabaceae or Leguminosae) are unique among cultivated plants for their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation with rhizobial bacteria, a process that takes place in a specialized structure known as the nodule. Legumes belong to one of the two main groups of eurosids, the Fabidae, which includes most species capable of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Legumes comprise several evolutionary lineages derived from a common ancestor 60 million years ago (Myr ago). Papilionoids are the largest clade, dating nearly to the origin of legumes and containing most cultivated species. Medicago truncatula is a long-established model for the study of legume biology. Here we describe the draft sequence of the M. truncatula euchromatin based on a recently completed BAC assembly supplemented with Illumina shotgun sequence, together capturing approximately 94% of all M. truncatula genes. A whole-genome duplication (WGD) approximately 58 Myr ago had a major role in shaping the M. truncatula genome and thereby contributed to the evolution of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Subsequent to the WGD, the M. truncatula genome experienced higher levels of rearrangement than two other sequenced legumes, Glycine max and Lotus japonicus. M. truncatula is a close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), a widely cultivated crop with limited genomics tools and complex autotetraploid genetics. As such, the M. truncatula genome sequence provides significant opportunities to expand alfalfa's genomic toolbox.
ESTHER : Young_2011_Nature_480_520
PubMedSearch : Young_2011_Nature_480_520
PubMedID: 22089132
Gene_locus related to this paper: medtr-b7fki4 , medtr-b7fmi1 , medtr-g7itl1 , medtr-g7iu67 , medtr-g7izm0 , medtr-g7j641 , medtr-g7jtf8 , medtr-g7jtg2 , medtr-g7jtg4 , medtr-g7kem3 , medtr-g7kml3 , medtr-g7ksx5 , medtr-g7leb3 , medtr-q1s5d8 , medtr-q1s9m3 , medtr-q1t171 , medtr-g7k9e1 , medtr-g7k9e3 , medtr-g7k9e5 , medtr-g7k9e8 , medtr-g7k9e9 , medtr-g7lbp2 , medtr-g7lch3 , medtr-g7ib94 , medtr-g7ljk8 , medtr-g7i6w5 , medtr-g7kvg4 , medtr-g7iam1 , medtr-g7iam3 , medtr-g7l754 , medtr-g7jr41 , medtr-g7l4f5 , medtr-g7l755 , medtr-a0a072vyl4 , medtr-g7jwk8 , medtr-a0a072vhg0 , medtr-a0a072vrv9 , medtr-g7kmk5 , medtr-a0a072uuf6 , medtr-a0a072urp3 , medtr-g7zzc3 , medtr-g7ie19 , medtr-g7kst7 , medtr-a0a072u5k5 , medtr-a0a072v056 , medtr-scp1 , medtr-g7kyn0 , medtr-g7inw6 , medtr-g7j3q3

Title : The Sorghum bicolor genome and the diversification of grasses - Paterson_2009_Nature_457_551
Author(s) : Paterson AH , Bowers JE , Bruggmann R , Dubchak I , Grimwood J , Gundlach H , Haberer G , Hellsten U , Mitros T , Poliakov A , Schmutz J , Spannagl M , Tang H , Wang X , Wicker T , Bharti AK , Chapman J , Feltus FA , Gowik U , Grigoriev IV , Lyons E , Maher CA , Martis M , Narechania A , Otillar RP , Penning BW , Salamov AA , Wang Y , Zhang L , Carpita NC , Freeling M , Gingle AR , Hash CT , Keller B , Klein P , Kresovich S , McCann MC , Ming R , Peterson DG , Mehboob ur R , Ware D , Westhoff P , Mayer KF , Messing J , Rokhsar DS
Ref : Nature , 457 :551 , 2009
Abstract : Sorghum, an African grass related to sugar cane and maize, is grown for food, feed, fibre and fuel. We present an initial analysis of the approximately 730-megabase Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench genome, placing approximately 98% of genes in their chromosomal context using whole-genome shotgun sequence validated by genetic, physical and syntenic information. Genetic recombination is largely confined to about one-third of the sorghum genome with gene order and density similar to those of rice. Retrotransposon accumulation in recombinationally recalcitrant heterochromatin explains the approximately 75% larger genome size of sorghum compared with rice. Although gene and repetitive DNA distributions have been preserved since palaeopolyploidization approximately 70 million years ago, most duplicated gene sets lost one member before the sorghum-rice divergence. Concerted evolution makes one duplicated chromosomal segment appear to be only a few million years old. About 24% of genes are grass-specific and 7% are sorghum-specific. Recent gene and microRNA duplications may contribute to sorghum's drought tolerance.
ESTHER : Paterson_2009_Nature_457_551
PubMedSearch : Paterson_2009_Nature_457_551
PubMedID: 19189423
Gene_locus related to this paper: sorbi-b3vtb2 , sorbi-c5wp75 , sorbi-c5wts6 , sorbi-c5wu07 , sorbi-c5wvl7 , sorbi-c5ww85 , sorbi-c5ww86 , sorbi-c5wxa4 , sorbi-c5x1f6 , sorbi-c5x2x9 , sorbi-c5x5z9 , sorbi-c5x6q0 , sorbi-c5x230 , sorbi-c5x290 , sorbi-c5x345 , sorbi-c5x399 , sorbi-c5x610 , sorbi-c5xbm4 , sorbi-c5xct0 , sorbi-c5xdv0 , sorbi-c5xe87 , sorbi-c5xf40 , sorbi-c5xfu9 , sorbi-c5xh40 , sorbi-c5xh41 , sorbi-c5xh42 , sorbi-c5xh43 , sorbi-c5xh44 , sorbi-c5xh46 , sorbi-c5xhr2 , sorbi-c5xiw7 , sorbi-c5xjf0 , sorbi-c5xky2 , sorbi-c5xm54 , sorbi-c5xmb9 , sorbi-c5xmz5 , sorbi-c5xp10 , sorbi-c5xpm6 , sorbi-c5xr91 , sorbi-c5xr92 , sorbi-c5xs33 , sorbi-c5xtz0 , sorbi-c5xwd3 , sorbi-c5y0d2 , sorbi-c5y0h4 , sorbi-c5y3i5 , sorbi-c5y7x0 , sorbi-c5y517 , sorbi-c5y545 , sorbi-c5ydr3 , sorbi-c5yec0 , sorbi-c5yf71 , sorbi-c5yi32 , sorbi-c5yih2 , sorbi-c5ylw6 , sorbi-c5yn66 , sorbi-c5ynp8 , sorbi-c5yt11 , sorbi-c5yur5 , sorbi-c5ywz3 , sorbi-c5ywz4 , sorbi-c5yx73 , sorbi-c5yyn0 , sorbi-c5z2m6 , sorbi-c5z6a9 , sorbi-c5z6j1 , sorbi-c5z6s5 , sorbi-c5z177 , sorbi-Q9XE80 , sorbi-c5xyg4 , sorbi-c5z4q0 , sorbi-c5xly4 , sorbi-c5z4u8 , sorbi-c5xxg5 , sorbi-c5z9b9 , sorbi-a0a1z5r970 , sorbi-c5xhf9 , sorbi-c5yxt7 , sorbi-c5yxt6 , sorbi-c5y1m2 , sorbi-c5xdy6 , sorbi-a0a194ysf6 , sorbi-a0a1b6pnr2 , sorbi-a0a1b6qcb9 , sorbi-c5xx30 , sorbi-a0a1b6psg4 , sorbi-a0a1z5rj80 , sorbi-a0a1b6qfm2 , sorbi-a0a1b6qmu5 , sorbi-c6jru0