Malek JA

References (4)

Title : The complete genome sequence and analysis of the epsilonproteobacterium Arcobacter butzleri - Miller_2007_PLoS.One_2_e1358
Author(s) : Miller WG , Parker CT , Rubenfield M , Mendz GL , Wosten MM , Ussery DW , Stolz JF , Binnewies TT , Hallin PF , Wang G , Malek JA , Rogosin A , Stanker LH , Mandrell RE
Ref : PLoS ONE , 2 :e1358 , 2007
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Arcobacter butzleri is a member of the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria and a close taxonomic relative of established pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the human clinical isolate, A. butzleri strain RM4018. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arcobacter butzleri is a member of the Campylobacteraceae, but the majority of its proteome is most similar to those of Sulfuromonas denitrificans and Wolinella succinogenes, both members of the Helicobacteraceae, and those of the deep-sea vent Epsilonproteobacteria Sulfurovum and Nitratiruptor. In addition, many of the genes and pathways described here, e.g. those involved in signal transduction and sulfur metabolism, have been identified previously within the epsilon subdivision only in S. denitrificans, W. succinogenes, Sulfurovum, and/or Nitratiruptor, or are unique to the subdivision. In addition, the analyses indicated also that a substantial proportion of the A. butzleri genome is devoted to growth and survival under diverse environmental conditions, with a large number of respiration-associated proteins, signal transduction and chemotaxis proteins and proteins involved in DNA repair and adaptation. To investigate the genomic diversity of A. butzleri strains, we constructed an A. butzleri DNA microarray comprising 2238 genes from strain RM4018. Comparative genomic indexing analysis of 12 additional A. butzleri strains identified both the core genes of A. butzleri and intraspecies hypervariable regions, where <70% of the genes were present in at least two strains. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of pathways and loci associated often with non-host-associated organisms, as well as genes associated with virulence, suggests that A. butzleri is a free-living, water-borne organism that might be classified rightfully as an emerging pathogen. The genome sequence and analyses presented in this study are an important first step in understanding the physiology and genetics of this organism, which constitutes a bridge between the environment and mammalian hosts.
ESTHER : Miller_2007_PLoS.One_2_e1358
PubMedSearch : Miller_2007_PLoS.One_2_e1358
PubMedID: 18159241
Gene_locus related to this paper: arcb4-a8esr8 , arcb4-a8ety0 , arcb4-a8euk7 , 9prot-e6l4v2 , 9prot-a0a0g9kwp1

Title : The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae - Holt_2002_Science_298_129
Author(s) : Holt RA , Subramanian GM , Halpern A , Sutton GG , Charlab R , Nusskern DR , Wincker P , Clark AG , Ribeiro JM , Wides R , Salzberg SL , Loftus B , Yandell M , Majoros WH , Rusch DB , Lai Z , Kraft CL , Abril JF , Anthouard V , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Baden H , de Berardinis V , Baldwin D , Benes V , Biedler J , Blass C , Bolanos R , Boscus D , Barnstead M , Cai S , Center A , Chaturverdi K , Christophides GK , Chrystal MA , Clamp M , Cravchik A , Curwen V , Dana A , Delcher A , Dew I , Evans CA , Flanigan M , Grundschober-Freimoser A , Friedli L , Gu Z , Guan P , Guigo R , Hillenmeyer ME , Hladun SL , Hogan JR , Hong YS , Hoover J , Jaillon O , Ke Z , Kodira C , Kokoza E , Koutsos A , Letunic I , Levitsky A , Liang Y , Lin JJ , Lobo NF , Lopez JR , Malek JA , McIntosh TC , Meister S , Miller J , Mobarry C , Mongin E , Murphy SD , O'Brochta DA , Pfannkoch C , Qi R , Regier MA , Remington K , Shao H , Sharakhova MV , Sitter CD , Shetty J , Smith TJ , Strong R , Sun J , Thomasova D , Ton LQ , Topalis P , Tu Z , Unger MF , Walenz B , Wang A , Wang J , Wang M , Wang X , Woodford KJ , Wortman JR , Wu M , Yao A , Zdobnov EM , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zhao S , Zhu SC , Zhimulev I , Coluzzi M , della Torre A , Roth CW , Louis C , Kalush F , Mural RJ , Myers EW , Adams MD , Smith HO , Broder S , Gardner MJ , Fraser CM , Birney E , Bork P , Brey PT , Venter JC , Weissenbach J , Kafatos FC , Collins FH , Hoffman SL
Ref : Science , 298 :129 , 2002
Abstract : Anopheles gambiae is the principal vector of malaria, a disease that afflicts more than 500 million people and causes more than 1 million deaths each year. Tenfold shotgun sequence coverage was obtained from the PEST strain of A. gambiae and assembled into scaffolds that span 278 million base pairs. A total of 91% of the genome was organized in 303 scaffolds; the largest scaffold was 23.1 million base pairs. There was substantial genetic variation within this strain, and the apparent existence of two haplotypes of approximately equal frequency ("dual haplotypes") in a substantial fraction of the genome likely reflects the outbred nature of the PEST strain. The sequence produced a conservative inference of more than 400,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that showed a markedly bimodal density distribution. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed strong evidence for about 14,000 protein-encoding transcripts. Prominent expansions in specific families of proteins likely involved in cell adhesion and immunity were noted. An expressed sequence tag analysis of genes regulated by blood feeding provided insights into the physiological adaptations of a hematophagous insect.
ESTHER : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedSearch : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedID: 12364791
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-a0nb77 , anoga-a0nbp6 , anoga-a0neb7 , anoga-a0nei9 , anoga-a0nej0 , anoga-a0ngj1 , anoga-a7ut12 , anoga-a7uuz9 , anoga-ACHE1 , anoga-ACHE2 , anoga-agCG44620 , anoga-agCG44666 , anoga-agCG45273 , anoga-agCG45279 , anoga-agCG45511 , anoga-agCG46741 , anoga-agCG47651 , anoga-agCG47655 , anoga-agCG47661 , anoga-agCG47690 , anoga-agCG48797 , anoga-AGCG49362 , anoga-agCG49462 , anoga-agCG49870 , anoga-agCG49872 , anoga-agCG49876 , anoga-agCG50851 , anoga-agCG51879 , anoga-agCG52383 , anoga-agCG54954 , anoga-AGCG55021 , anoga-agCG55401 , anoga-agCG55408 , anoga-agCG56978 , anoga-ebiG239 , anoga-ebiG2660 , anoga-ebiG5718 , anoga-ebiG5974 , anoga-ebiG8504 , anoga-ebiG8742 , anoga-glita , anoga-nrtac , anoga-q5tpv0 , anoga-Q5TVS6 , anoga-q7pm39 , anoga-q7ppw9 , anoga-q7pq17 , anoga-Q7PQT0 , anoga-q7q8m4 , anoga-q7q626 , anoga-q7qa14 , anoga-q7qa52 , anoga-q7qal7 , anoga-q7qbj0 , anoga-f5hl20 , anoga-q7qkh2 , anoga-a0a1s4h1y7 , anoga-q7q887

Title : Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences - Strausberg_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_16899
Author(s) : Strausberg RL , Feingold EA , Grouse LH , Derge JG , Klausner RD , Collins FS , Wagner L , Shenmen CM , Schuler GD , Altschul SF , Zeeberg B , Buetow KH , Schaefer CF , Bhat NK , Hopkins RF , Jordan H , Moore T , Max SI , Wang J , Hsieh F , Diatchenko L , Marusina K , Farmer AA , Rubin GM , Hong L , Stapleton M , Soares MB , Bonaldo MF , Casavant TL , Scheetz TE , Brownstein MJ , Usdin TB , Toshiyuki S , Carninci P , Prange C , Raha SS , Loquellano NA , Peters GJ , Abramson RD , Mullahy SJ , Bosak SA , McEwan PJ , McKernan KJ , Malek JA , Gunaratne PH , Richards S , Worley KC , Hale S , Garcia AM , Gay LJ , Hulyk SW , Villalon DK , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Lu X , Gibbs RA , Fahey J , Helton E , Ketteman M , Madan A , Rodrigues S , Sanchez A , Whiting M , Young AC , Shevchenko Y , Bouffard GG , Blakesley RW , Touchman JW , Green ED , Dickson MC , Rodriguez AC , Grimwood J , Schmutz J , Myers RM , Butterfield YS , Krzywinski MI , Skalska U , Smailus DE , Schnerch A , Schein JE , Jones SJ , Marra MA
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :16899 , 2002
Abstract : The National Institutes of Health Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) Program is a multiinstitutional effort to identify and sequence a cDNA clone containing a complete ORF for each human and mouse gene. ESTs were generated from libraries enriched for full-length cDNAs and analyzed to identify candidate full-ORF clones, which then were sequenced to high accuracy. The MGC has currently sequenced and verified the full ORF for a nonredundant set of >9,000 human and >6,000 mouse genes. Candidate full-ORF clones for an additional 7,800 human and 3,500 mouse genes also have been identified. All MGC sequences and clones are available without restriction through public databases and clone distribution networks (see http:mgc.nci.nih.gov).
ESTHER : Strausberg_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_16899
PubMedSearch : Strausberg_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_16899
PubMedID: 12477932
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-q3zcj6 , danre-OVCA2 , danre-q4qrh4 , danre-q4v960 , danre-q32ls6 , danre-q503e2 , ratno-CPVL , ratno-q3mhs0 , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q5fvr5 , ratno-q32q55 , xenla-a2bd54 , xenla-q2tap9 , xenla-q3kq37 , xenla-q3kq76 , xenla-q4klb6 , xenla-q32n48 , xenla-q32ns5 , xenla-q52l41 , xentr-q4va73 , danre-a7mbu9

Title : Evidence for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and bacteria from genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima - Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Clayton RA , Gill SR , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Nelson WC , Ketchum KA , McDonald L , Utterback TR , Malek JA , Linher KD , Garrett MM , Stewart AM , Cotton MD , Pratt MS , Phillips CA , Richardson D , Heidelberg J , Sutton GG , Fleischmann RD , Eisen JA , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 399 :323 , 1999
Abstract : The 1,860,725-base-pair genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8 contains 1,877 predicted coding regions, 1,014 (54%) of which have functional assignments and 863 (46%) of which are of unknown function. Genome analysis reveals numerous pathways involved in degradation of sugars and plant polysaccharides, and 108 genes that have orthologues only in the genomes of other thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea. Of the Eubacteria sequenced to date, T. maritima has the highest percentage (24%) of genes that are most similar to archaeal genes. Eighty-one archaeal-like genes are clustered in 15 regions of the T. maritima genome that range in size from 4 to 20 kilobases. Conservation of gene order between T. maritima and Archaea in many of the clustered regions suggests that lateral gene transfer may have occurred between thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea.
ESTHER : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedSearch : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedID: 10360571
Gene_locus related to this paper: thema-ESTA , thema-q9x0d6 , thema-q9x042 , thema-TM0033 , thema-TM0053 , thema-TM0077 , thema-TM0336 , thema-TM1160 , thema-TM1350