Nelson KE

References (39)

Title : Draft Genome Sequences of Two Pairs of Human Intestinal Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains, 44B and 1-6B and 35B and 2-2B, Consecutively Isolated from Two Children after a 5-Year Time Period - Shkoporov_2013_Genome.Announc_1_e00234
Author(s) : Shkoporov AN , Efimov BA , Khokhlova EV , Chaplin AV , Kafarskaya LI , Durkin AS , McCorrison J , Torralba M , Gillis M , Sutton G , Weibel DB , Nelson KE , Smeianov VV
Ref : Genome Announc , 1 :e00234 , 2013
Abstract : We report the genome sequences of four isolates of a human gut symbiont, Bifidobacterium longum. Strains 44B and 35B were isolated from two 1-year-old infants, while 1-6B and 2-2B were isolated from the same children 5 years later. The sequences permit investigations of factors enabling long-term colonization of bifidobacteria.
ESTHER : Shkoporov_2013_Genome.Announc_1_e00234
PubMedSearch : Shkoporov_2013_Genome.Announc_1_e00234
PubMedID: 23682142
Gene_locus related to this paper: bifln-c2gtr2

Title : Draft Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecalis PC1.1, a Candidate Probiotic Strain Isolated from Human Feces - O Cuv_2013_Genome.Announc_1_e00160
Author(s) : O Cuv P , Klaassens ES , Smith WJ , Mondot S , Durkin AS , Harkins DM , Foster L , McCorrison J , Torralba M , Nelson KE , Morrison M
Ref : Genome Announc , 1 : e00160 , 2013
Abstract : Enterococcus faecalis is commonly isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of healthy infants and adults, where it contributes to host health and well-being. We describe here the draft genome sequence of E. faecalis PC1.1, a candidate probiotic strain isolated from human feces.
ESTHER : O Cuv_2013_Genome.Announc_1_e00160
PubMedSearch : O Cuv_2013_Genome.Announc_1_e00160
PubMedID: 23469340
Gene_locus related to this paper: entfl-e2z7d4

Title : Draft genome sequence of Bacteroides vulgatus PC510, a strain isolated from human feces - Cuiv_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_4025
Author(s) : Cuiv PO , Klaassens ES , Durkin AS , Harkins DM , Foster L , McCorrison J , Torralba M , Nelson KE , Morrison M
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 193 :4025 , 2011
Abstract : Although Bacteroides vulgatus is one of the most prevalent microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract little is known about the genetic potential of this species Here we describe the annotated draft genome sequence of B vulgatus PC510 isolated from human feces.
ESTHER : Cuiv_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_4025
PubMedSearch : Cuiv_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_4025
PubMedID: 21622758
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9bace-b6w170 , bacv8-a6kwf6 , bacv8-a6kzc1 , bacv8-a6kze8 , bacv8-a6l1d0 , bacv8-a6l1u9 , bacv8-a6l018 , bacv8-a6l715 , bacvu-d4vbw6

Title : Draft genome sequence of Turicibacter sanguinis PC909, isolated from human feces - Cuiv_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_1288
Author(s) : Cuiv PO , Klaassens ES , Durkin AS , Harkins DM , Foster L , McCorrison J , Torralba M , Nelson KE , Morrison M
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 193 :1288 , 2011
Abstract : While the microbiota resident in the human gut is now known to provide a range of functions relevant to host health, many of the microbial members of the community have not yet been cultured or are represented by a limited number of isolates. We describe here the draft genome sequence of Turicibacter sanguinis PC909, isolated from a pooled healthy human fecal sample as part of the Australian Human Gut Microbiome Project.
ESTHER : Cuiv_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_1288
PubMedSearch : Cuiv_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_1288
PubMedID: 21183674
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9firm-d4w7y6 , 9firm-d4w7y7 , 9firm-f0hgc7 , 9firm-d4w6y8 , 9firm-d4w5a4

Title : Comparative genomics of Gardnerella vaginalis strains reveals substantial differences in metabolic and virulence potential - Yeoman_2010_PLoS.One_5_e12411
Author(s) : Yeoman CJ , Yildirim S , Thomas SM , Durkin AS , Torralba M , Sutton G , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha SP , Muzny DM , Qin X , Gibbs RA , Leigh SR , Stumpf R , White BA , Highlander SK , Nelson KE , Wilson BA
Ref : PLoS ONE , 5 :e12411 , 2010
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Gardnerella vaginalis is described as a common vaginal bacterial species whose presence correlates strongly with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Here we report the genome sequencing and comparative analyses of three strains of G. vaginalis. Strains 317 (ATCC 14019) and 594 (ATCC 14018) were isolated from the vaginal tracts of women with symptomatic BV, while Strain 409-05 was isolated from a healthy, asymptomatic individual with a Nugent score of 9. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Substantial genomic rearrangement and heterogeneity were observed that appeared to have resulted from both mobile elements and substantial lateral gene transfer. These genomic differences translated to differences in metabolic potential. All strains are equipped with significant virulence potential, including genes encoding the previously described vaginolysin, pili for cytoadhesion, EPS biosynthetic genes for biofilm formation, and antimicrobial resistance systems, We also observed systems promoting multi-drug and lantibiotic extrusion. All G. vaginalis strains possess a large number of genes that may enhance their ability to compete with and exclude other vaginal colonists. These include up to six toxin-antitoxin systems and up to nine additional antitoxins lacking cognate toxins, several of which are clustered within each genome. All strains encode bacteriocidal toxins, including two lysozyme-like toxins produced uniquely by strain 409-05. Interestingly, the BV isolates encode numerous proteins not found in strain 409-05 that likely increase their pathogenic potential. These include enzymes enabling mucin degradation, a trait previously described to strongly correlate with BV, although commonly attributed to non-G. vaginalis species.
CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results indicate that all three strains are able to thrive in vaginal environments, and therein the BV isolates are capable of occupying a niche that is unique from 409-05. Each strain has significant virulence potential, although genomic and metabolic differences, such as the ability to degrade mucin, indicate that the detection of G. vaginalis in the vaginal tract provides only partial information on the physiological potential of the organism.
ESTHER : Yeoman_2010_PLoS.One_5_e12411
PubMedSearch : Yeoman_2010_PLoS.One_5_e12411
PubMedID: 20865041
Gene_locus related to this paper: garv4-d2rbq6 , garv4-d2rap1 , garv3-e3d9p1

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx

Title : Comparative genome analysis of Prevotella ruminicola and Prevotella bryantii: insights into their environmental niche - Purushe_2010_Microb.Ecol_60_721
Author(s) : Purushe J , Fouts DE , Morrison M , White BA , Mackie RI , Coutinho PM , Henrissat B , Nelson KE
Ref : Microb Ecol , 60 :721 , 2010
Abstract : The Prevotellas comprise a diverse group of bacteria that has received surprisingly limited attention at the whole genome-sequencing level. In this communication, we present the comparative analysis of the genomes of Prevotella ruminicola 23 (GenBank: CP002006) and Prevotella bryantii B(1)4 (GenBank: ADWO00000000), two gastrointestinal isolates. Both P. ruminicola and P. bryantii have acquired an extensive repertoire of glycoside hydrolases that are targeted towards non-cellulosic polysaccharides, especially GH43 bifunctional enzymes. Our analysis demonstrates the diversity of this genus. The results from these analyses highlight their role in the gastrointestinal tract, and provide a template for additional work on genetic characterization of these species.
ESTHER : Purushe_2010_Microb.Ecol_60_721
PubMedSearch : Purushe_2010_Microb.Ecol_60_721
PubMedID: 20585943
Gene_locus related to this paper: prebr-d8dt96 , prebr-d8du06 , prebr-d8dv28 , prebr-d8dwg8 , prebr-d8dy06 , prer2-d5esm6 , prebr-d8dul5 , prebr-d8dxa2 , prebr-d8dw03 , prer2-d5erq4 , prer2-d5ewz1 , prebr-d8dv01 , prer2-axea1 , prer2-axfa

Title : Three genomes from the phylum Acidobacteria provide insight into the lifestyles of these microorganisms in soils - Ward_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_2046
Author(s) : Ward NL , Challacombe JF , Janssen PH , Henrissat B , Coutinho PM , Wu M , Xie G , Haft DH , Sait M , Badger J , Barabote RD , Bradley B , Brettin TS , Brinkac LM , Bruce D , Creasy T , Daugherty SC , Davidsen TM , DeBoy RT , Detter JC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Ganapathy A , Gwinn-Giglio M , Han CS , Khouri H , Kiss H , Kothari SP , Madupu R , Nelson KE , Nelson WC , Paulsen I , Penn K , Ren Q , Rosovitz MJ , Selengut JD , Shrivastava S , Sullivan SA , Tapia R , Thompson LS , Watkins KL , Yang Q , Yu C , Zafar N , Zhou L , Kuske CR
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 75 :2046 , 2009
Abstract : The complete genomes of three strains from the phylum Acidobacteria were compared. Phylogenetic analysis placed them as a unique phylum. They share genomic traits with members of the Proteobacteria, the Cyanobacteria, and the Fungi. The three strains appear to be versatile heterotrophs. Genomic and culture traits indicate the use of carbon sources that span simple sugars to more complex substrates such as hemicellulose, cellulose, and chitin. The genomes encode low-specificity major facilitator superfamily transporters and high-affinity ABC transporters for sugars, suggesting that they are best suited to low-nutrient conditions. They appear capable of nitrate and nitrite reduction but not N(2) fixation or denitrification. The genomes contained numerous genes that encode siderophore receptors, but no evidence of siderophore production was found, suggesting that they may obtain iron via interaction with other microorganisms. The presence of cellulose synthesis genes and a large class of novel high-molecular-weight excreted proteins suggests potential traits for desiccation resistance, biofilm formation, and/or contribution to soil structure. Polyketide synthase and macrolide glycosylation genes suggest the production of novel antimicrobial compounds. Genes that encode a variety of novel proteins were also identified. The abundance of acidobacteria in soils worldwide and the breadth of potential carbon use by the sequenced strains suggest significant and previously unrecognized contributions to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Combining our genomic evidence with available culture traits, we postulate that cells of these isolates are long-lived, divide slowly, exhibit slow metabolic rates under low-nutrient conditions, and are well equipped to tolerate fluctuations in soil hydration.
ESTHER : Ward_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_2046
PubMedSearch : Ward_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_2046
PubMedID: 19201974
Gene_locus related to this paper: korve-q1ihr9 , korve-q1ii02 , korve-q1iit0 , korve-q1ilk4 , korve-q1imj9 , korve-q1ims4 , korve-q1iqj0 , korve-q1isy7 , korve-q1itj5 , korve-q1itz6 , korve-q1ivc8 , acic5-c1f1u6 , acic5-c1f2i7 , acic5-c1f4m6 , acic5-c1f4y4 , acic5-c1f5a7 , acic5-c1f5u2 , acic5-c1f7a9 , acic5-c1f7x6 , acic5-c1f8y9 , acic5-c1f9m2 , acic5-c1f594 , acic5-c1f609 , acic5-c1f692 , acic5-c1f970 , acic5-c1fa52 , korve-q1iiw2 , korve-q1ivn9 , solue-q01nb0 , solue-q01qj6 , solue-q01r37 , solue-q01rq8 , solue-q01rz0 , solue-q01t44 , solue-q01t57 , solue-q01ts5 , solue-q01tv4 , solue-q01vd8 , solue-q01vr3 , solue-q01vw5 , solue-q01w12 , solue-q01wt9 , solue-q01y40 , solue-q01ym8 , solue-q01z24 , solue-q01z97 , solue-q01zl4 , solue-q01zm0 , solue-q01zm5 , solue-q01zm7 , solue-q02aa4 , solue-q02ab9 , solue-q02b72 , solue-q02bs8 , solue-q02bt7 , solue-q02cp0 , solue-q02d61 , solue-q020h3 , solue-q020i8 , solue-q021i6 , solue-q022b1 , solue-q022p8 , solue-q022q2 , solue-q022q3 , solue-q022x2 , solue-q022x5 , solue-q022x6 , solue-q022x8 , solue-q023e7 , solue-q024d9 , solue-q025c1 , solue-q026j1 , solue-q026k6 , solue-q026r6 , solue-q027p2 , solue-q027r8 , solue-q01zt5 , korve-q1itw6 , solue-q01yh7 , solue-q02ad6 , korve-q1imj6 , korve-q1iuf6 , acic5-c1f891 , solue-q026h7

Title : Insights into plant cell wall degradation from the genome sequence of the soil bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus - DeBoy_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_5455
Author(s) : DeBoy RT , Mongodin EF , Fouts DE , Tailford LE , Khouri H , Emerson JB , Mohamoud Y , Watkins K , Henrissat B , Gilbert HJ , Nelson KE
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 190 :5455 , 2008
Abstract : The plant cell wall, which consists of a highly complex array of interconnecting polysaccharides, is the most abundant source of organic carbon in the biosphere. Microorganisms that degrade the plant cell wall synthesize an extensive portfolio of hydrolytic enzymes that display highly complex molecular architectures. To unravel the intricate repertoire of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes synthesized by the saprophytic soil bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus, we sequenced and analyzed its genome, which predicts that the bacterium contains the complete repertoire of enzymes required to degrade plant cell wall and storage polysaccharides. Approximately one-third of these putative proteins (57) are predicted to contain carbohydrate binding modules derived from 13 of the 49 known families. Sequence analysis reveals approximately 130 predicted glycoside hydrolases that target the major structural and storage plant polysaccharides. In common with that of the colonic prokaryote Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, the genome of C. japonicus is predicted to encode a large number of GH43 enzymes, suggesting that the extensive arabinose decorations appended to pectins and xylans may represent a major nutrient source, not just for intestinal bacteria but also for microorganisms that occupy terrestrial ecosystems. The results presented here predict that C. japonicus possesses an extensive range of glycoside hydrolases, lyases, and esterases. Most importantly, the genome of C. japonicus is remarkably similar to that of the gram-negative marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans 2-40(T). Approximately 50% of the predicted C. japonicus plant-degradative apparatus appears to be shared with S. degradans, consistent with the utilization of plant-derived complex carbohydrates as a major substrate by both organisms.
ESTHER : DeBoy_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_5455
PubMedSearch : DeBoy_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_5455
PubMedID: 18556790
Gene_locus related to this paper: celju-b3pei5 , celju-b3pf25 , celju-b3pfb5 , celju-b3pgh5 , celju-b3pgz5 , celju-b3ph03 , celju-b3pi00 , celju-b3pi89 , celju-b3pj26 , celju-b3pju5 , celju-b3pks4 , celju-b3pks5 , celju-b3plp7 , celju-metx , celju-b3phr4 , celju-b3pjj6 , celju-b3pcj5 , celju-b3pcu6 , celju-b3pei0

Title : Secrets of soil survival revealed by the genome sequence of Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 - Mongodin_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e214
Author(s) : Mongodin EF , Shapir N , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Emerson JB , Shvartzbeyn A , Radune D , Vamathevan J , Riggs F , Grinberg V , Khouri H , Wackett LP , Nelson KE , Sadowsky MJ
Ref : PLoS Genet , 2 :e214 , 2006
Abstract : Arthrobacter sp. strains are among the most frequently isolated, indigenous, aerobic bacterial genera found in soils. Member of the genus are metabolically and ecologically diverse and have the ability to survive in environmentally harsh conditions for extended periods of time. The genome of Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1, which was originally isolated from soil at an atrazine spill site, is composed of a single 4,597,686 basepair (bp) circular chromosome and two circular plasmids, pTC1 and pTC2, which are 408,237 bp and 300,725 bp, respectively. Over 66% of the 4,702 open reading frames (ORFs) present in the TC1 genome could be assigned a putative function, and 13.2% (623 genes) appear to be unique to this bacterium, suggesting niche specialization. The genome of TC1 is most similar to that of Tropheryma, Leifsonia, Streptomyces, and Corynebacterium glutamicum, and analyses suggest that A. aurescens TC1 has expanded its metabolic abilities by relying on the duplication of catabolic genes and by funneling metabolic intermediates generated by plasmid-borne genes to chromosomally encoded pathways. The data presented here suggest that Arthrobacter's environmental prevalence may be due to its ability to survive under stressful conditions induced by starvation, ionizing radiation, oxygen radicals, and toxic chemicals.
ESTHER : Mongodin_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e214
PubMedSearch : Mongodin_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e214
PubMedID: 17194220
Gene_locus related to this paper: artat-a1r1g1 , artat-a1r2c8 , artat-a1r3u0 , artat-a1r3x5 , artat-a1r4v1 , artat-a1r5d9 , artat-a1r6c9 , artat-a1r6v0 , artat-a1r6v1 , artat-a1r6y1 , artat-a1r7h1 , artat-a1r7q0 , artat-a1r7v1 , artat-a1r9g3 , artat-a1r9t7 , artat-a1r9u8 , artat-a1r171 , artat-a1r172 , artat-a1r173 , artat-a1r612 , artat-a1r682 , artat-a1ra89 , artat-a1ra98 , artat-a1ram7 , artat-a1rb20 , artat-a1rbd0 , artat-a1rbi2 , artat-a1rbl7 , artat-a1rbz2 , artat-a1r0x8 , artat-a1r1x6 , artat-a1r6f6

Title : Comparative genomic evidence for a close relationship between the dimorphic prosthecate bacteria Hyphomonas neptunium and Caulobacter crescentus - Badger_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_6841
Author(s) : Badger JH , Hoover TR , Brun YV , Weiner RM , Laub MT , Alexandre G , Mrazek J , Ren Q , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Khouri HM , Radune D , Sosa J , Dodson RJ , Sullivan SA , Rosovitz MJ , Madupu R , Brinkac LM , Durkin AS , Daugherty SC , Kothari SP , Giglio MG , Zhou L , Haft DH , Selengut JD , Davidsen TM , Yang Q , Zafar N , Ward NL
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 188 :6841 , 2006
Abstract : The dimorphic prosthecate bacteria (DPB) are alpha-proteobacteria that reproduce in an asymmetric manner rather than by binary fission and are of interest as simple models of development. Prior to this work, the only member of this group for which genome sequence was available was the model freshwater organism Caulobacter crescentus. Here we describe the genome sequence of Hyphomonas neptunium, a marine member of the DPB that differs from C. crescentus in that H. neptunium uses its stalk as a reproductive structure. Genome analysis indicates that this organism shares more genes with C. crescentus than it does with Silicibacter pomeroyi (a closer relative according to 16S rRNA phylogeny), that it relies upon a heterotrophic strategy utilizing a wide range of substrates, that its cell cycle is likely to be regulated in a similar manner to that of C. crescentus, and that the outer membrane complements of H. neptunium and C. crescentus are remarkably similar. H. neptunium swarmer cells are highly motile via a single polar flagellum. With the exception of cheY and cheR, genes required for chemotaxis were absent in the H. neptunium genome. Consistent with this observation, H. neptunium swarmer cells did not respond to any chemotactic stimuli that were tested, which suggests that H. neptunium motility is a random dispersal mechanism for swarmer cells rather than a stimulus-controlled navigation system for locating specific environments. In addition to providing insights into bacterial development, the H. neptunium genome will provide an important resource for the study of other interesting biological processes including chromosome segregation, polar growth, and cell aging.
ESTHER : Badger_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_6841
PubMedSearch : Badger_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_6841
PubMedID: 16980487
Gene_locus related to this paper: hypna-q0bwt8 , hypna-q0bwv5 , hypna-q0bww7 , hypna-q0bxb2 , hypna-q0bxr5 , hypna-q0by84 , hypna-q0byl3 , hypna-q0bz23 , hypna-q0bzi5 , hypna-q0c0f7 , hypna-q0c0f8 , hypna-q0c2v8 , hypna-q0c2w1 , hypna-q0c2w4 , hypna-q0c3g0 , hypna-q0c4j0 , hypna-q0c4n1 , hypna-q0c4q9 , hypna-q0c4v5 , hypna-q0c386 , hypna-q0c539 , hypna-q0c611

Title : Insights on evolution of virulence and resistance from the complete genome analysis of an early methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and a biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strain - Gill_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_2426
Author(s) : Gill SR , Fouts DE , Archer GL , Mongodin EF , DeBoy RT , Ravel J , Paulsen IT , Kolonay JF , Brinkac L , Beanan M , Dodson RJ , Daugherty SC , Madupu R , Angiuoli SV , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Vamathevan J , Khouri H , Utterback T , Lee C , Dimitrov G , Jiang L , Qin H , Weidman J , Tran K , Kang K , Hance IR , Nelson KE , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 187 :2426 , 2005
Abstract : Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the major causative agent of numerous hospital- and community-acquired infections. Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a causative agent of infections often associated with implanted medical devices. We have sequenced the approximately 2.8-Mb genome of S. aureus COL, an early methicillin-resistant isolate, and the approximately 2.6-Mb genome of S. epidermidis RP62a, a methicillin-resistant biofilm isolate. Comparative analysis of these and other staphylococcal genomes was used to explore the evolution of virulence and resistance between these two species. The S. aureus and S. epidermidis genomes are syntenic throughout their lengths and share a core set of 1,681 open reading frames. Genome islands in nonsyntenic regions are the primary source of variations in pathogenicity and resistance. Gene transfer between staphylococci and low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria appears to have shaped their virulence and resistance profiles. Integrated plasmids in S. epidermidis carry genes encoding resistance to cadmium and species-specific LPXTG surface proteins. A novel genome island encodes multiple phenol-soluble modulins, a potential S. epidermidis virulence factor. S. epidermidis contains the cap operon, encoding the polyglutamate capsule, a major virulence factor in Bacillus anthracis. Additional phenotypic differences are likely the result of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which are most numerous in cell envelope proteins. Overall differences in pathogenicity can be attributed to genome islands in S. aureus which encode enterotoxins, exotoxins, leukocidins, and leukotoxins not found in S. epidermidis.
ESTHER : Gill_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_2426
PubMedSearch : Gill_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_2426
PubMedID: 15774886
Gene_locus related to this paper: staau-LIP , staau-lipas , staau-MW0741 , staau-MW2456 , staau-q6gfm6 , staau-SA0011 , staau-SA0569 , staau-SA0572 , staau-SA0897 , staau-SA1143 , staau-SA2240 , staau-SA2306 , staau-SA2367 , staau-SA2422 , staau-SAV0321 , staau-SAV0446 , staau-SAV0457 , staau-SAV0655 , staau-SAV1014 , staau-SAV1765 , staau-SAV1793 , staau-SAV2188 , staau-SAV2350 , staau-SAV2484 , staau-SAV2594 , staep-lipas , staep-SE0011 , staep-SE0226 , staep-SE0386 , staep-SE0389 , staep-SE0424 , staep-SE0564 , staep-SE0714 , staep-SE0745 , staep-SE0980 , staep-SE1436 , staep-SE1460 , staep-SE1510 , staep-SE1780 , staep-SE1929 , staep-SERP2035 , staep-SE2050 , staep-SE2095 , staep-SE2213 , staep-SE2328

Title : The genome of Salinibacter ruber: convergence and gene exchange among hyperhalophilic bacteria and archaea - Mongodin_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_18147
Author(s) : Mongodin EF , Nelson KE , Daugherty S , DeBoy RT , Wister J , Khouri H , Weidman J , Walsh DA , Papke RT , Sanchez Perez G , Sharma AK , Nesbo CL , Macleod D , Bapteste E , Doolittle WF , Charlebois RL , Legault B , Rodriguez-Valera F
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 102 :18147 , 2005
Abstract : Saturated thalassic brines are among the most physically demanding habitats on Earth: few microbes survive in them. Salinibacter ruber is among these organisms and has been found repeatedly in significant numbers in climax saltern crystallizer communities. The phenotype of this bacterium is remarkably similar to that of the hyperhalophilic Archaea (Haloarchaea). The genome sequence suggests that this resemblance has arisen through convergence at the physiological level (different genes producing similar overall phenotype) and the molecular level (independent mutations yielding similar sequences or structures). Several genes and gene clusters also derive by lateral transfer from (or may have been laterally transferred to) haloarchaea. S. ruber encodes four rhodopsins. One resembles bacterial proteorhodopsins and three are of the haloarchaeal type, previously uncharacterized in a bacterial genome. The impact of these modular adaptive elements on the cell biology and ecology of S. ruber is substantial, affecting salt adaptation, bioenergetics, and photobiology.
ESTHER : Mongodin_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_18147
PubMedSearch : Mongodin_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_18147
PubMedID: 16330755
Gene_locus related to this paper: salrd-q2ryx4 , salrd-q2ryz7 , salrd-q2rz15 , salrd-q2rz19 , salrd-q2rz52 , salrd-q2rz84 , salrd-q2rzy1 , salrd-q2s0e4 , salrd-q2s1i8 , salrd-q2s1v7 , salrd-q2s1v9 , salrd-q2s2d6 , salrd-q2s2y7 , salrd-q2s5a6 , salrd-q2s5k5 , salrd-q2s5u7 , salrd-q2s6g6 , salrd-q2s039 , salrd-q2s117 , salrd-q2s215 , salrd-q2s287 , salrd-q2s400 , salrd-q2s402 , salrd-q2s473 , salrd-q2s516 , salrd-q2s564

Title : The psychrophilic lifestyle as revealed by the genome sequence of Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H through genomic and proteomic analyses - Methe_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_10913
Author(s) : Methe BA , Nelson KE , Deming JW , Momen B , Melamud E , Zhang X , Moult J , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , DeBoy RT , Kolonay JF , Sullivan SA , Zhou L , Davidsen TM , Wu M , Huston AL , Lewis M , Weaver B , Weidman JF , Khouri H , Utterback TR , Feldblyum TV , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 102 :10913 , 2005
Abstract : The completion of the 5,373,180-bp genome sequence of the marine psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a model for the study of life in permanently cold environments, reveals capabilities important to carbon and nutrient cycling, bioremediation, production of secondary metabolites, and cold-adapted enzymes. From a genomic perspective, cold adaptation is suggested in several broad categories involving changes to the cell membrane fluidity, uptake and synthesis of compounds conferring cryotolerance, and strategies to overcome temperature-dependent barriers to carbon uptake. Modeling of three-dimensional protein homology from bacteria representing a range of optimal growth temperatures suggests changes to proteome composition that may enhance enzyme effectiveness at low temperatures. Comparative genome analyses suggest that the psychrophilic lifestyle is most likely conferred not by a unique set of genes but by a collection of synergistic changes in overall genome content and amino acid composition.
ESTHER : Methe_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_10913
PubMedSearch : Methe_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_10913
PubMedID: 16043709
Gene_locus related to this paper: colp3-q47uc4 , colp3-q47uc7 , colp3-q47ut6 , colp3-q47ut7 , colp3-q47v81 , colp3-q47vk3 , colp3-q47vy9 , colp3-q47w94 , colp3-q47wj4 , colp3-q47wr2 , colp3-q47ws7 , colp3-q47ws9 , colp3-q47x08 , colp3-q47x48 , colp3-q47yd5 , colp3-q47ye2 , colp3-q47yq1 , colp3-q47yv1 , colp3-q47za7 , colp3-q47zp5 , colp3-q48ac9 , colp3-q48aj8 , colp3-q48aq9 , colp3-q480e1 , colp3-q481z4 , colp3-q482y8 , colp3-q484d8 , colp3-q484k3 , colp3-q485e4 , colp3-q485t4 , colp3-q486t5 , colp3-q487b7 , colp3-q487s5 , colp3-q488a3 , colp3-q488d2 , colp3-q488d8 , colp3-q488e7 , colp3-q488f8 , colp3-q488p2 , colp3-q489b1 , colp3-q489i6 , colp3-q47ya3

Title : Genome sequence of the PCE-dechlorinating bacterium Dehalococcoides ethenogenes - Seshadri_2005_Science_307_105
Author(s) : Seshadri R , Adrian L , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Phillippy AM , Methe BA , Ward NL , Nelson WC , DeBoy RT , Khouri HM , Kolonay JF , Dodson RJ , Daugherty SC , Brinkac LM , Sullivan SA , Madupu R , Nelson KE , Kang KH , Impraim M , Tran K , Robinson JM , Forberger HA , Fraser CM , Zinder SH , Heidelberg JF
Ref : Science , 307 :105 , 2005
Abstract : Dehalococcoides ethenogenes is the only bacterium known to reductively dechlorinate the groundwater pollutants, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene, to ethene. Its 1,469,720-base pair chromosome contains large dynamic duplicated regions and integrated elements. Genes encoding 17 putative reductive dehalogenases, nearly all of which were adjacent to genes for transcription regulators, and five hydrogenase complexes were identified. These findings, plus a limited repertoire of other metabolic modes, indicate that D. ethenogenes is highly evolved to utilize halogenated organic compounds and H2. Diversification of reductive dehalogenase functions appears to have been mediated by recent genetic exchange and amplification. Genome analysis provides insights into the organism's complex nutrient requirements and suggests that an ancestor was a nitrogen-fixing autotroph.
ESTHER : Seshadri_2005_Science_307_105
PubMedSearch : Seshadri_2005_Science_307_105
PubMedID: 15637277
Gene_locus related to this paper: dehm1-q3z6q3 , dehm1-q3z6x9 , dehm1-q3z6z2 , dehm1-q3z8f3 , dehm1-q3za50

Title : Major structural differences and novel potential virulence mechanisms from the genomes of multiple campylobacter species - Fouts_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e15
Author(s) : Fouts DE , Mongodin EF , Mandrell RE , Miller WG , Rasko DA , Ravel J , Brinkac LM , DeBoy RT , Parker CT , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Sullivan SA , Shetty JU , Ayodeji MA , Shvartsbeyn A , Schatz MC , Badger JH , Fraser CM , Nelson KE
Ref : PLoS Biol , 3 :e15 , 2005
Abstract : Sequencing and comparative genome analysis of four strains of Campylobacter including C. lari RM2100, C. upsaliensis RM3195, and C. coli RM2228 has revealed major structural differences that are associated with the insertion of phage- and plasmid-like genomic islands, as well as major variations in the lipooligosaccharide complex. Poly G tracts are longer, are greater in number, and show greater variability in C. upsaliensis than in the other species. Many genes involved in host colonization, including racR/S, cadF, cdt, ciaB, and flagellin genes, are conserved across the species, but variations that appear to be species specific are evident for a lipooligosaccharide locus, a capsular (extracellular) polysaccharide locus, and a novel Campylobacter putative licABCD virulence locus. The strains also vary in their metabolic profiles, as well as their resistance profiles to a range of antibiotics. It is evident that the newly identified hypothetical and conserved hypothetical proteins, as well as uncharacterized two-component regulatory systems and membrane proteins, may hold additional significant information on the major differences in virulence among the species, as well as the specificity of the strains for particular hosts.
ESTHER : Fouts_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e15
PubMedSearch : Fouts_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e15
PubMedID: 15660156
Gene_locus related to this paper: camje-CJ0796C , camjr-q5ht69 , camjr-q5ht95 , camjr-q5huc7 , camjr-q5hwg6 , camju-a3yll6

Title : Whole genome comparisons of serotype 4b and 1\/2a strains of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes reveal new insights into the core genome components of this species - Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fouts DE , Mongodin EF , Ravel J , DeBoy RT , Kolonay JF , Rasko DA , Angiuoli SV , Gill SR , Paulsen IT , Peterson J , White O , Nelson WC , Nierman W , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Haft DH , Selengut J , Van Aken S , Khouri H , Fedorova N , Forberger H , Tran B , Kathariou S , Wonderling LD , Uhlich GA , Bayles DO , Luchansky JB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 32 :2386 , 2004
Abstract : The genomes of three strains of Listeria monocytogenes that have been associated with food-borne illness in the USA were subjected to whole genome comparative analysis. A total of 51, 97 and 69 strain-specific genes were identified in L.monocytogenes strains F2365 (serotype 4b, cheese isolate), F6854 (serotype 1/2a, frankfurter isolate) and H7858 (serotype 4b, meat isolate), respectively. Eighty-three genes were restricted to serotype 1/2a and 51 to serotype 4b strains. These strain- and serotype-specific genes probably contribute to observed differences in pathogenicity, and the ability of the organisms to survive and grow in their respective environmental niches. The serotype 1/2a-specific genes include an operon that encodes the rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that is associated with teichoic acid biosynthesis, as well as operons for five glycosyl transferases and an adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase. A total of 8603 and 105 050 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the draft genome sequences of strain H7858 and strain F6854, respectively, when compared with strain F2365. Whole genome comparative analyses revealed that the L.monocytogenes genomes are essentially syntenic, with the majority of genomic differences consisting of phage insertions, transposable elements and SNPs.
ESTHER : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedID: 15115801
Gene_locus related to this paper: lismc-c1l0d9 , lismf-q71xq4 , lismo-LMO0110 , lismo-LMO0493 , lismo-LMO0580 , lismo-LMO0752 , lismo-LMO0760 , lismo-LMO0857 , lismo-LMO0950 , lismo-LMO0951 , lismo-LMO0977 , lismo-LMO1128 , lismo-LMO1258 , lismo-LMO1674 , lismo-LMO2089 , lismo-LMO2109 , lismo-LMO2433 , lismo-LMO2450 , lismo-LMO2452 , lismo-LMO2453 , lismo-LMO2578 , lismo-LMO2677 , lismo-LMO2755 , lismo-metx

Title : Phylogenomics of the reproductive parasite Wolbachia pipientis wMel: a streamlined genome overrun by mobile genetic elements - Wu_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_E69
Author(s) : Wu M , Sun LV , Vamathevan J , Riegler M , Deboy R , Brownlie JC , McGraw EA , Martin W , Esser C , Ahmadinejad N , Wiegand C , Madupu R , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Mohamoud Y , Lee P , Berry K , Young MB , Utterback T , Weidman J , Nierman WC , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , O'Neill SL , Eisen JA
Ref : PLoS Biol , 2 :E69 , 2004
Abstract : The complete sequence of the 1,267,782 bp genome of Wolbachia pipientis wMel, an obligate intracellular bacteria of Drosophila melanogaster, has been determined. Wolbachia, which are found in a variety of invertebrate species, are of great interest due to their diverse interactions with different hosts, which range from many forms of reproductive parasitism to mutualistic symbioses. Analysis of the wMel genome, in particular phylogenomic comparisons with other intracellular bacteria, has revealed many insights into the biology and evolution of wMel and Wolbachia in general. For example, the wMel genome is unique among sequenced obligate intracellular species in both being highly streamlined and containing very high levels of repetitive DNA and mobile DNA elements. This observation, coupled with multiple evolutionary reconstructions, suggests that natural selection is somewhat inefficient in wMel, most likely owing to the occurrence of repeated population bottlenecks. Genome analysis predicts many metabolic differences with the closely related Rickettsia species, including the presence of intact glycolysis and purine synthesis, which may compensate for an inability to obtain ATP directly from its host, as Rickettsia can. Other discoveries include the apparent inability of wMel to synthesize lipopolysaccharide and the presence of the most genes encoding proteins with ankyrin repeat domains of any prokaryotic genome yet sequenced. Despite the ability of wMel to infect the germline of its host, we find no evidence for either recent lateral gene transfer between wMel and D. melanogaster or older transfers between Wolbachia and any host. Evolutionary analysis further supports the hypothesis that mitochondria share a common ancestor with the alpha-Proteobacteria, but shows little support for the grouping of mitochondria with species in the order Rickettsiales. With the availability of the complete genomes of both species and excellent genetic tools for the host, the wMel-D. melanogaster symbiosis is now an ideal system for studying the biology and evolution of Wolbachia infections.
ESTHER : Wu_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_E69
PubMedSearch : Wu_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_E69
PubMedID: 15024419
Gene_locus related to this paper: wolpm-q73gf0 , wolpm-q73gx7

Title : Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome - Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
Author(s) : Nierman WC , DeShazer D , Kim HS , Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Feldblyum T , Ulrich RL , Ronning CM , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Davidsen TD , DeBoy RT , Dimitrov G , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Khouri H , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Mohammoud Y , Nelson WC , Radune D , Romero CM , Sarria S , Selengut J , Shamblin C , Sullivan SA , White O , Yu Y , Zafar N , Zhou L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :14246 , 2004
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression profiling of the bacterium in hamster liver in vivo. The genome contains numerous insertion sequence elements that have mediated extensive deletions and rearrangements of the genome relative to Burkholderia pseudomallei. The genome also contains a vast number (>12,000) of simple sequence repeats. Variation in simple sequence repeats in key genes can provide a mechanism for generating antigenic variation that may account for the mammalian host's inability to mount a durable adaptive immune response to a B. mallei infection.
ESTHER : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedID: 15377793
Gene_locus related to this paper: burma-a5j5w8 , burma-a5tj72 , burma-a5tq93 , burma-metx , burma-q62a61 , burma-q62ar2.1 , burma-q62ar2.2 , burma-q62ax8 , burma-q62b60 , burma-q62b79 , burma-q62bh9 , burma-q62bl4 , burma-q62bl7 , burma-q62c00 , burma-q62cg5 , burma-q62d41 , burma-q62d56 , burma-q62d83 , burma-q62dg2 , burma-q62du7 , burma-q62e67 , burma-q62eb8 , burma-q62ed8 , burma-q62f28 , burma-q62fx7 , burma-q62g26 , burma-q62gx9 , burma-q62gy2 , burma-q62hq2 , burma-q62i62 , burma-q62ib8 , burma-q62ie8 , burma-q62j07 , burma-q62j15 , burma-q62jn5 , burma-q62jy7 , burma-q62kb7 , burma-q62kg0 , burma-q62kh9 , burma-q62lp7 , burma-q62m40 , burma-q62mc3 , burma-q62mf4 , burma-q62mq7 , burma-q629m1 , burma-q629p4 , burma-q629u0 , burps-q3v7s4 , burps-hboh

Title : Genomic insights into methanotrophy: the complete genome sequence of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) - Ward_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_e303
Author(s) : Ward N , Larsen O , Sakwa J , Bruseth L , Khouri H , Durkin AS , Dimitrov G , Jiang L , Scanlan D , Kang KH , Lewis M , Nelson KE , Methe B , Wu M , Heidelberg JF , Paulsen IT , Fouts D , Ravel J , Tettelin H , Ren Q , Read T , DeBoy RT , Seshadri R , Salzberg SL , Jensen HB , Birkeland NK , Nelson WC , Dodson RJ , Grindhaug SH , Holt I , Eidhammer I , Jonasen I , Vanaken S , Utterback T , Feldblyum TV , Fraser CM , Lillehaug JR , Eisen JA
Ref : PLoS Biol , 2 :e303 , 2004
Abstract : Methanotrophs are ubiquitous bacteria that can use the greenhouse gas methane as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, thus playing major roles in global carbon cycles, and in particular, substantially reducing emissions of biologically generated methane to the atmosphere. Despite their importance, and in contrast to organisms that play roles in other major parts of the carbon cycle such as photosynthesis, no genome-level studies have been published on the biology of methanotrophs. We report the first complete genome sequence to our knowledge from an obligate methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), obtained by the shotgun sequencing approach. Analysis revealed a 3.3-Mb genome highly specialized for a methanotrophic lifestyle, including redundant pathways predicted to be involved in methanotrophy and duplicated genes for essential enzymes such as the methane monooxygenases. We used phylogenomic analysis, gene order information, and comparative analysis with the partially sequenced methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens to detect genes of unknown function likely to be involved in methanotrophy and methylotrophy. Genome analysis suggests the ability of M. capsulatus to scavenge copper (including a previously unreported nonribosomal peptide synthetase) and to use copper in regulation of methanotrophy, but the exact regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. One of the most surprising outcomes of the project is evidence suggesting the existence of previously unsuspected metabolic flexibility in M. capsulatus, including an ability to grow on sugars, oxidize chemolithotrophic hydrogen and sulfur, and live under reduced oxygen tension, all of which have implications for methanotroph ecology. The availability of the complete genome of M. capsulatus (Bath) deepens our understanding of methanotroph biology and its relationship to global carbon cycles. We have gained evidence for greater metabolic flexibility than was previously known, and for genetic components that may have biotechnological potential.
ESTHER : Ward_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_e303
PubMedSearch : Ward_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_e303
PubMedID: 15383840
Gene_locus related to this paper: metca-q60a38 , metca-q60bu6 , metca-q60cn0 , metca-q605j8 , metca-q606x9 , metca-q607f7 , metca-q607m2 , metca-q609v0

Title : The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames and comparison to closely related bacteria - Read_2003_Nature_423_81
Author(s) : Read TD , Peterson SN , Tourasse N , Baillie LW , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Gill SR , Holtzapple EK , Okstad OA , Helgason E , Rilstone J , Wu M , Kolonay JF , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Gwinn M , DeBoy RT , Madpu R , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Pop M , Khouri HM , Radune D , Benton JL , Mahamoud Y , Jiang L , Hance IR , Weidman JF , Berry KJ , Plaut RD , Wolf AM , Watkins KL , Nierman WC , Hazen A , Cline R , Redmond C , Thwaite JE , White O , Salzberg SL , Thomason B , Friedlander AM , Koehler TM , Hanna PC , Kolsto AB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 423 :81 , 2003
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis is an endospore-forming bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax. Key virulence genes are found on plasmids (extra-chromosomal, circular, double-stranded DNA molecules) pXO1 (ref. 2) and pXO2 (ref. 3). To identify additional genes that might contribute to virulence, we analysed the complete sequence of the chromosome of B. anthracis Ames (about 5.23 megabases). We found several chromosomally encoded proteins that may contribute to pathogenicity--including haemolysins, phospholipases and iron acquisition functions--and identified numerous surface proteins that might be important targets for vaccines and drugs. Almost all these putative chromosomal virulence and surface proteins have homologues in Bacillus cereus, highlighting the similarity of B. anthracis to near-neighbours that are not associated with anthrax. By performing a comparative genome hybridization of 19 B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains against a B. anthracis DNA microarray, we confirmed the general similarity of chromosomal genes among this group of close relatives. However, we found that the gene sequences of pXO1 and pXO2 were more variable between strains, suggesting plasmid mobility in the group. The complete sequence of B. anthracis is a step towards a better understanding of anthrax pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedID: 12721629
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0160 , bacan-BA0950 , bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA1747 , bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA1914 , bacan-BA2015 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2417 , bacan-BA2557 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA2687 , bacan-BA2694 , bacan-BA2738 , bacan-BA2865 , bacan-BA3068 , bacan-BA3165 , bacan-BA3178 , bacan-BA3187 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3372 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA3887 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4328 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA4983 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacan-q81tt2 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx

Title : Genome of Geobacter sulfurreducens: metal reduction in subsurface environments - Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
Author(s) : Methe BA , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Paulsen IT , Nelson W , Heidelberg JF , Wu D , Wu M , Ward N , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Sullivan SA , Haft DH , Selengut J , Davidsen TM , Zafar N , White O , Tran B , Romero C , Forberger HA , Weidman J , Khouri H , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Van Aken SE , Lovley DR , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 302 :1967 , 2003
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a delta-proteobacterium, reveals unsuspected capabilities, including evidence of aerobic metabolism, one-carbon and complex carbon metabolism, motility, and chemotactic behavior. These characteristics, coupled with the possession of many two-component sensors and many c-type cytochromes, reveal an ability to create alternative, redundant, electron transport networks and offer insights into the process of metal ion reduction in subsurface environments. As well as playing roles in the global cycling of metals and carbon, this organism clearly has the potential for use in bioremediation of radioactive metals and in the generation of electricity.
ESTHER : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedSearch : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedID: 14671304
Gene_locus related to this paper: geosl-q74a54 , geosl-q74ac8 , geosl-q74eb1 , geosl-q747u4 , geosl-q747v8 , geosl-q749w4

Title : Complete genome sequence of the oral pathogenic Bacterium porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 - Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fleischmann RD , DeBoy RT , Paulsen IT , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Mason T , Tallon L , Gray J , Granger D , Tettelin H , Dong H , Galvin JL , Duncan MJ , Dewhirst FE , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 185 :5591 , 2003
Abstract : The complete 2,343,479-bp genome sequence of the gram-negative, pathogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83, a major contributor to periodontal disease, was determined. Whole-genome comparative analysis with other available complete genome sequences confirms the close relationship between the Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (CFB) phylum and the green-sulfur bacteria. Within the CFB phyla, the genomes most similar to that of P. gingivalis are those of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and B. fragilis. Outside of the CFB phyla the most similar genome to P. gingivalis is that of Chlorobium tepidum, supporting the previous phylogenetic studies that indicated that the Chlorobia and CFB phyla are related, albeit distantly. Genome analysis of strain W83 reveals a range of pathways and virulence determinants that relate to the novel biology of this oral pathogen. Among these determinants are at least six putative hemagglutinin-like genes and 36 previously unidentified peptidases. Genome analysis also reveals that P. gingivalis can metabolize a range of amino acids and generate a number of metabolic end products that are toxic to the human host or human gingival tissue and contribute to the development of periodontal disease.
ESTHER : Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
PubMedID: 12949112
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9gamm-q4a538 , porgi-DPP , porgi-q7mtk3 , porgi-q7mu18 , porgi-q7mub3 , porgi-q7muw6 , porgi-q7mvp4 , porgi-q7mwa7 , porgi-q7mx03

Title : Role of mobile DNA in the evolution of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis - Paulsen_2003_Science_299_2071
Author(s) : Paulsen IT , Banerjei L , Myers GS , Nelson KE , Seshadri R , Read TD , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Gill SR , Heidelberg JF , Tettelin H , Dodson RJ , Umayam L , Brinkac L , Beanan M , Daugherty S , DeBoy RT , Durkin S , Kolonay J , Madupu R , Nelson W , Vamathevan J , Tran B , Upton J , Hansen T , Shetty J , Khouri H , Utterback T , Radune D , Ketchum KA , Dougherty BA , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 299 :2071 , 2003
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis V583, a vancomycin-resistant clinical isolate, revealed that more than a quarter of the genome consists of probable mobile or foreign DNA. One of the predicted mobile elements is a previously unknown vanB vancomycin-resistance conjugative transposon. Three plasmids were identified, including two pheromone-sensing conjugative plasmids, one encoding a previously undescribed pheromone inhibitor. The apparent propensity for the incorporation of mobile elements probably contributed to the rapid acquisition and dissemination of drug resistance in the enterococci.
ESTHER : Paulsen_2003_Science_299_2071
PubMedSearch : Paulsen_2003_Science_299_2071
PubMedID: 12663927
Gene_locus related to this paper: entfa-EF0101 , entfa-EF0274 , entfa-EF0381 , entfa-EF0449 , entfa-EF0667 , entfa-EF0786 , entfa-EF1028 , entfa-EF1236 , entfa-EF1505 , entfa-EF1536 , entfa-EF1670 , entfa-EF2618 , entfa-EF2728 , entfa-EF2792 , entfa-EF2963 , entfa-EF3191

Title : Complete genome sequence of the Q-fever pathogen Coxiella burnetii - Seshadri_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_5455
Author(s) : Seshadri R , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Read TD , Nelson KE , Nelson WC , Ward NL , Tettelin H , Davidsen TM , Beanan MJ , DeBoy RT , Daugherty SC , Brinkac LM , Madupu R , Dodson RJ , Khouri HM , Lee KH , Carty HA , Scanlan D , Heinzen RA , Thompson HA , Samuel JE , Fraser CM , Heidelberg JF
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 100 :5455 , 2003
Abstract : The 1,995,275-bp genome of Coxiella burnetii, Nine Mile phase I RSA493, a highly virulent zoonotic pathogen and category B bioterrorism agent, was sequenced by the random shotgun method. This bacterium is an obligate intracellular acidophile that is highly adapted for life within the eukaryotic phagolysosome. Genome analysis revealed many genes with potential roles in adhesion, invasion, intracellular trafficking, host-cell modulation, and detoxification. A previously uncharacterized 13-member family of ankyrin repeat-containing proteins is implicated in the pathogenesis of this organism. Although the lifestyle and parasitic strategies of C. burnetii resemble that of Rickettsiae and Chlamydiae, their genome architectures differ considerably in terms of presence of mobile elements, extent of genome reduction, metabolic capabilities, and transporter profiles. The presence of 83 pseudogenes displays an ongoing process of gene degradation. Unlike other obligate intracellular bacteria, 32 insertion sequences are found dispersed in the chromosome, indicating some plasticity in the C. burnetii genome. These analyses suggest that the obligate intracellular lifestyle of C. burnetii may be a relatively recent innovation.
ESTHER : Seshadri_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_5455
PubMedSearch : Seshadri_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_5455
PubMedID: 12704232
Gene_locus related to this paper: coxbu-BIOH , coxbu-CBU0752 , coxbu-CBU1119 , coxbu-CBU1225 , coxbu-CBU1529 , coxbu-CBU1769 , coxbu-CBU1975

Title : The Brucella suis genome reveals fundamental similarities between animal and plant pathogens and symbionts - Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
Author(s) : Paulsen IT , Seshadri R , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Read TD , Dodson RJ , Umayam L , Brinkac LM , Beanan MJ , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Ayodeji B , Kraul M , Shetty J , Malek J , Van Aken SE , Riedmuller S , Tettelin H , Gill SR , White O , Salzberg SL , Hoover DL , Lindler LE , Halling SM , Boyle SM , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :13148 , 2002
Abstract : The 3.31-Mb genome sequence of the intracellular pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent, Brucella suis, was determined. Comparison of B. suis with Brucella melitensis has defined a finite set of differences that could be responsible for the differences in virulence and host preference between these organisms, and indicates that phage have played a significant role in their divergence. Analysis of the B. suis genome reveals transport and metabolic capabilities akin to soil/plant-associated bacteria. Extensive gene synteny between B. suis chromosome 1 and the genome of the plant symbiont Mesorhizobium loti emphasizes the similarity between this animal pathogen and plant pathogens and symbionts. A limited repertoire of genes homologous to known bacterial virulence factors were identified.
ESTHER : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedSearch : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedID: 12271122
Gene_locus related to this paper: brume-BMEI0552 , brume-BMEI0733 , brume-BMEI1044 , brume-BMEI1119 , brume-BMEI1365 , brume-BMEI1594 , brume-BMEI1608 , brume-BMEI1822 , brume-BMEI1884 , brume-BMEI1951 , brume-BMEI2011 , brume-BMEII0047 , brume-BMEII0681 , brume-BMEII0989 , brume-PCAD , brusu-BR0288 , brusu-BR1291 , brusu-BR1327 , brusu-BRA0989

Title : Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum - Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Hall N , Fung E , White O , Berriman M , Hyman RW , Carlton JM , Pain A , Nelson KE , Bowman S , Paulsen IT , James K , Eisen JA , Rutherford K , Salzberg SL , Craig A , Kyes S , Chan MS , Nene V , Shallom SJ , Suh B , Peterson J , Angiuoli S , Pertea M , Allen J , Selengut J , Haft D , Mather MW , Vaidya AB , Martin DM , Fairlamb AH , Fraunholz MJ , Roos DS , Ralph SA , McFadden GI , Cummings LM , Subramanian GM , Mungall C , Venter JC , Carucci DJ , Hoffman SL , Newbold C , Davis RW , Fraser CM , Barrell B
Ref : Nature , 419 :498 , 2002
Abstract : The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for hundreds of millions of cases of malaria, and kills more than one million African children annually. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. The 23-megabase nuclear genome consists of 14 chromosomes, encodes about 5,300 genes, and is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date. Genes involved in antigenic variation are concentrated in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. Compared to the genomes of free-living eukaryotic microbes, the genome of this intracellular parasite encodes fewer enzymes and transporters, but a large proportion of genes are devoted to immune evasion and host-parasite interactions. Many nuclear-encoded proteins are targeted to the apicoplast, an organelle involved in fatty-acid and isoprenoid metabolism. The genome sequence provides the foundation for future studies of this organism, and is being exploited in the search for new drugs and vaccines to fight malaria.
ESTHER : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
PubMedID: 12368864
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plaf7-q8i5y6 , plaf7-q8iik5 , plafa-PF10.0018 , plafa-PF10.0020 , plafa-PF10.0379 , plafa-PF11.0211 , plafa-PF11.0276 , plafa-PF11.0441 , plafa-PF14.0015 , plafa-PF14.0017 , plafa-PF14.0099 , plafa-PF14.0250 , plafa-PF14.0395 , plafa-PF14.0737 , plafa-PF14.0738 , plafa-PFL2530W

Title : Genome sequence of the dissimilatory metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis - Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Gaidos EJ , Nelson WC , Read TD , Eisen JA , Seshadri R , Ward N , Methe B , Clayton RA , Meyer T , Tsapin A , Scott J , Beanan M , Brinkac L , Daugherty S , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Wolf AM , Vamathevan J , Weidman J , Impraim M , Lee K , Berry K , Lee C , Mueller J , Khouri H , Gill J , Utterback TR , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Smith HO , Venter JC , Nealson KH , Fraser CM
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 20 :1118 , 2002
Abstract : Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities, conferred in part by multicomponent, branched electron transport systems. Here we report the sequencing of the S. oneidensis genome, which consists of a 4,969,803-base pair circular chromosome with 4,758 predicted protein-encoding open reading frames (CDS) and a 161,613-base pair plasmid with 173 CDSs. We identified the first Shewanella lambda-like phage, providing a potential tool for further genome engineering. Genome analysis revealed 39 c-type cytochromes, including 32 previously unidentified in S. oneidensis, and a novel periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase, which are integral members of the electron transport system. This genome sequence represents a critical step in the elucidation of the pathways for reduction (and bioremediation) of pollutants such as uranium (U) and chromium (Cr), and offers a starting point for defining this organism's complex electron transport systems and metal ion-reducing capabilities.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedID: 12368813
Gene_locus related to this paper: sheon-BIOH , sheon-LYPA , sheon-PIP , sheon-PTRB , sheon-q8ej95 , sheon-SO0071 , sheon-SO0614 , sheon-SO0616 , sheon-SO0801 , sheon-SO0880 , sheoe-SO0967 , sheon-SO1006 , sheon-SO1224 , sheon-SO1310 , sheon-SO1534 , sheon-SO1539 , sheon-SO1686 , sheon-SO1743 , sheon-SO1976 , sheon-SO1999 , sheon-SO2024 , sheon-SO2047 , sheon-SO2055 , sheon-SO2223 , sheon-SO2333 , sheon-SO2473 , sheon-SO2582 , sheon-SO2753 , sheon-SO2934 , sheon-SO3025 , sheon-SO3900 , sheon-SO3990 , sheon-SO4252 , sheon-SO4400 , sheon-SO4537 , sheon-SO4543 , sheon-SO4574 , sheon-SO4618 , sheon-SO4650 , sheon-SOA0048 , shefn-SfSFGH , sheon-ym51

Title : The complete genome sequence of Chlorobium tepidum TLS, a photosynthetic, anaerobic, green-sulfur bacterium - Eisen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_9509
Author(s) : Eisen JA , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Heidelberg JF , Wu M , Dodson RJ , Deboy R , Gwinn ML , Nelson WC , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Durkin AS , Kolonay JL , Yang F , Holt I , Umayam LA , Mason T , Brenner M , Shea TP , Parksey D , Nierman WC , Feldblyum TV , Hansen CL , Craven MB , Radune D , Vamathevan J , Khouri H , White O , Gruber TM , Ketchum KA , Venter JC , Tettelin H , Bryant DA , Fraser CM
Ref : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , 99 :9509 , 2002
Abstract : The complete genome of the green-sulfur eubacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS was determined to be a single circular chromosome of 2,154,946 bp. This represents the first genome sequence from the phylum Chlorobia, whose members perform anoxygenic photosynthesis by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genome comparisons have identified genes in C. tepidum that are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. Many of these have no assigned function and may play novel roles in photosynthesis or photobiology. Phylogenomic analysis reveals likely duplications of genes involved in biosynthetic pathways for photosynthesis and the metabolism of sulfur and nitrogen as well as strong similarities between metabolic processes in C. tepidum and many Archaeal species.
ESTHER : Eisen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_9509
PubMedSearch : Eisen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_9509
PubMedID: 12093901
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlte-CT0177 , chlte-CT0524 , chlte-CT0717 , chlte-CT0947 , chlte-CT1208 , chlte-CT1253 , chlte-CT1301 , chlte-CT1312 , chlte-CT1856 , chlte-CT1908 , chlte-CT2087 , chlte-CT2271 , chlte-MENH , chlte-MET2 , chlte-q4w546 , chlte-q8kgb8

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of the metabolically versatile Pseudomonas putida KT2440 - Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinel C , Paulsen IT , Dodson RJ , Hilbert H , Martins dos Santos VA , Fouts DE , Gill SR , Pop M , Holmes M , Brinkac L , Beanan M , DeBoy RT , Daugherty S , Kolonay J , Madupu R , Nelson W , White O , Peterson J , Khouri H , Hance I , Chris Lee P , Holtzapple E , Scanlan D , Tran K , Moazzez A , Utterback T , Rizzo M , Lee K , Kosack D , Moestl D , Wedler H , Lauber J , Stjepandic D , Hoheisel J , Straetz M , Heim S , Kiewitz C , Eisen JA , Timmis KN , Dusterhoft A , Tummler B , Fraser CM
Ref : Environ Microbiol , 4 :799 , 2002
Abstract : Pseudomonas putida is a metabolically versatile saprophytic soil bacterium that has been certified as a biosafety host for the cloning of foreign genes. The bacterium also has considerable potential for biotechnological applications. Sequence analysis of the 6.18 Mb genome of strain KT2440 reveals diverse transport and metabolic systems. Although there is a high level of genome conservation with the pathogenic Pseudomonad Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85% of the predicted coding regions are shared), key virulence factors including exotoxin A and type III secretion systems are absent. Analysis of the genome gives insight into the non-pathogenic nature of P. putida and points to potential new applications in agriculture, biocatalysis, bioremediation and bioplastic production.
ESTHER : Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
PubMedID: 12534463
Gene_locus related to this paper: psep1-a5wa77 , psep1-a5wax1 , psepk-q88nk6 , psepk-q88qt0 , psepu-acoc , psepu-BIOH , psepu-bpest , psepu-ESTB , psepu-LIP , psepu-METX , psepu-PHAC1 , psepu-PHAC2 , psepu-PHAG , psepu-PHAZ , psepu-PIP , psepu-PP0375 , psepu-PP0498 , psepu-PP0532 , psepu-PP1064 , psepu-PP1184 , psepu-PP1310 , psepu-PP1500 , psepu-PP1617 , psepu-PP1829 , psepu-PP1979 , psepu-PP2083 , psepu-PP2201 , psepu-PP2236 , psepu-PP2567 , psepu-PP2804 , psepu-PP2934 , psepu-PP3195 , psepu-PP3367 , psepu-PP3404 , psepu-PP3645 , psepu-PP3807 , psepu-PP3812 , psepu-PP3943 , psepu-PP4164 , psepu-PP4165 , psepu-PP4178 , psepu-PP4249 , psepu-PP4540 , psepu-PP4551 , psepu-PP4583 , psepu-PP4624 , psepu-PP4634 , psepu-PP4916 , psepu-PP5117 , psepu-PP5161 , psepu-PP5167 , psepu-PPSD , psepu-Q8KQK1 , psepu-q9wwz4

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae - Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Masignani V , Cieslewicz MJ , Eisen JA , Peterson S , Wessels MR , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Margarit I , Read TD , Madoff LC , Wolf AM , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Lewis MR , Radune D , Fedorova NB , Scanlan D , Khouri H , Mulligan S , Carty HA , Cline RT , Van Aken SE , Gill J , Scarselli M , Mora M , Iacobini ET , Brettoni C , Galli G , Mariani M , Vegni F , Maione D , Rinaudo D , Rappuoli R , Telford JL , Kasper DL , Grandi G , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :12391 , 2002
Abstract : The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the other completely sequenced genomes identified genes specific to the streptococci and to S. agalactiae. These in silico analyses, combined with comparative genome hybridization experiments between the sequenced serotype V strain 2603 V/R and 19 S. agalactiae strains from several serotypes using whole-genome microarrays, revealed the genetic heterogeneity among S. agalactiae strains, even of the same serotype, and provided insights into the evolution of virulence mechanisms.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
PubMedID: 12200547
Gene_locus related to this paper: strag-ESTA , strag-GBS0040 , strag-GBS1828 , strag-pepx , strag-SAG0108 , strag-SAG0246 , strag-SAG0383 , strag-SAG0521 , strag-SAG0679 , strag-SAG0680 , strag-SAG0681 , strag-SAG0785 , strag-SAG0912 , strag-SAG1040 , strag-SAG1562 , strag-SAG2132

Title : Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus - Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Feldblyum TV , Laub MT , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Alley MR , Ohta N , Maddock JR , Potocka I , Nelson WC , Newton A , Stephens C , Phadke ND , Ely B , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Smit J , Craven MB , Khouri H , Shetty J , Berry K , Utterback T , Tran K , Wolf A , Vamathevan J , Ermolaeva M , White O , Salzberg SL , Venter JC , Shapiro L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 98 :4136 , 2001
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus was determined to be 4,016,942 base pairs in a single circular chromosome encoding 3,767 genes. This organism, which grows in a dilute aquatic environment, coordinates the cell division cycle and multiple cell differentiation events. With the annotated genome sequence, a full description of the genetic network that controls bacterial differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle progression is within reach. Two-component signal transduction proteins are known to play a significant role in cell cycle progression. Genome analysis revealed that the C. crescentus genome encodes a significantly higher number of these signaling proteins (105) than any bacterial genome sequenced thus far. Another regulatory mechanism involved in cell cycle progression is DNA methylation. The occurrence of the recognition sequence for an essential DNA methylating enzyme that is required for cell cycle regulation is severely limited and shows a bias to intergenic regions. The genome contains multiple clusters of genes encoding proteins essential for survival in a nutrient poor habitat. Included are those involved in chemotaxis, outer membrane channel function, degradation of aromatic ring compounds, and the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources, in addition to many extracytoplasmic function sigma factors, providing the organism with the ability to respond to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. C. crescentus is, to our knowledge, the first free-living alpha-class proteobacterium to be sequenced and will serve as a foundation for exploring the biology of this group of bacteria, which includes the obligate endosymbiont and human pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the bovine and human pathogen Brucella abortus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedID: 11259647
Gene_locus related to this paper: caucr-CC0087 , caucr-CC0223 , caucr-CC0341 , caucr-CC0352 , caucr-CC0355 , caucr-CC0384 , caucr-CC0477 , caucr-CC0478 , caucr-CC0525 , caucr-CC0552 , caucr-CC0771 , caucr-CC0799 , caucr-CC0847 , caucr-CC0936 , caucr-CC0940 , caucr-CC1048 , caucr-CC1053 , caucr-CC1175 , caucr-CC1226 , caucr-CC1227 , caucr-CC1229 , caucr-CC1499 , caucr-CC1622 , caucr-CC1734 , caucr-CC1867 , caucr-CC1986 , caucr-CC2083 , caucr-CC2154 , caucr-CC2185 , caucr-CC2230 , caucr-CC2253 , caucr-CC2298 , caucr-CC2313 , caucr-CC2358 , caucr-CC2395 , caucr-CC2411 , caucr-CC2515 , caucr-CC2565 , caucr-CC2671 , caucr-CC2710 , caucr-CC2763 , caucr-CC2797 , caucr-CC3039 , caucr-CC3091 , caucr-CC3099 , caucr-CC3204 , caucr-CC3246 , caucr-CC3300 , caucr-CC3308 , caucr-CC3346 , caucr-CC3418 , caucr-CC3441 , caucr-CC3442 , caucr-CC3634 , caucr-CC3687 , caucr-CC3688 , caucr-CC3723 , caucr-CC3725 , caucr-CC3758 , caucr-PHAZ , caucr-PHBC , caucr-q9a8c1 , caucr-q9aac8

Title : Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae - Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Read TD , Peterson S , Heidelberg J , DeBoy RT , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Salzberg SL , Lewis MR , Radune D , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Wolf AM , Utterback TR , Hansen CL , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Angiuoli S , Dickinson T , Hickey EK , Holt IE , Loftus BJ , Yang F , Smith HO , Venter JC , Dougherty BA , Morrison DA , Hollingshead SK , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 293 :498 , 2001
Abstract : The 2,160,837-base pair genome sequence of an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and otitis media, contains 2236 predicted coding regions; of these, 1440 (64%) were assigned a biological role. Approximately 5% of the genome is composed of insertion sequences that may contribute to genome rearrangements through uptake of foreign DNA. Extracellular enzyme systems for the metabolism of polysaccharides and hexosamines provide a substantial source of carbon and nitrogen for S. pneumoniae and also damage host tissues and facilitate colonization. A motif identified within the signal peptide of proteins is potentially involved in targeting these proteins to the cell surface of low-guanine/cytosine (GC) Gram-positive species. Several surface-exposed proteins that may serve as potential vaccine candidates were identified. Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedID: 11463916
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpj-b8zns7 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-b2dz20 , strpn-pepx , strpn-SP0614 , strpn-SP0666 , strpn-SP0777 , strpn-SP0902 , strpn-SP1343

Title : Complete genome sequence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 - Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Saunders NJ , Heidelberg J , Jeffries AC , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Ketchum KA , Hood DW , Peden JF , Dodson RJ , Nelson WC , Gwinn ML , Deboy R , Peterson JD , Hickey EK , Haft DH , Salzberg SL , White O , Fleischmann RD , Dougherty BA , Mason T , Ciecko A , Parksey DS , Blair E , Cittone H , Clark EB , Cotton MD , Utterback TR , Khouri H , Qin H , Vamathevan J , Gill J , Scarlato V , Masignani V , Pizza M , Grandi G , Sun L , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Moxon ER , Rappuoli R , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :1809 , 2000
Abstract : The 2,272,351-base pair genome of Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 (serogroup B), a causative agent of meningitis and septicemia, contains 2158 predicted coding regions, 1158 (53.7%) of which were assigned a biological role. Three major islands of horizontal DNA transfer were identified; two of these contain genes encoding proteins involved in pathogenicity, and the third island contains coding sequences only for hypothetical proteins. Insights into the commensal and virulence behavior of N. meningitidis can be gleaned from the genome, in which sequences for structural proteins of the pilus are clustered and several coding regions unique to serogroup B capsular polysaccharide synthesis can be identified. Finally, N. meningitidis contains more genes that undergo phase variation than any pathogen studied to date, a mechanism that controls their expression and contributes to the evasion of the host immune system.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedID: 10710307
Gene_locus related to this paper: neigo-pip , neima-metx , neimb-q9k0t9 , neime-ESD , neime-NMA2216 , neime-NMB0276 , neime-NMB0868 , neime-NMB1828 , neime-NMB1877

Title : DNA sequence of both chromosomes of the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae - Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Eisen JA , Nelson WC , Clayton RA , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Umayam L , Gill SR , Nelson KE , Read TD , Tettelin H , Richardson D , Ermolaeva MD , Vamathevan J , Bass S , Qin H , Dragoi I , Sellers P , McDonald L , Utterback T , Fleishmann RD , Nierman WC , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Colwell RR , Mekalanos JJ , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 406 :477 , 2000
Abstract : Here we determine the complete genomic sequence of the gram negative, gamma-Proteobacterium Vibrio cholerae El Tor N16961 to be 4,033,460 base pairs (bp). The genome consists of two circular chromosomes of 2,961,146 bp and 1,072,314 bp that together encode 3,885 open reading frames. The vast majority of recognizable genes for essential cell functions (such as DNA replication, transcription, translation and cell-wall biosynthesis) and pathogenicity (for example, toxins, surface antigens and adhesins) are located on the large chromosome. In contrast, the small chromosome contains a larger fraction (59%) of hypothetical genes compared with the large chromosome (42%), and also contains many more genes that appear to have origins other than the gamma-Proteobacteria. The small chromosome also carries a gene capture system (the integron island) and host 'addiction' genes that are typically found on plasmids; thus, the small chromosome may have originally been a megaplasmid that was captured by an ancestral Vibrio species. The V. cholerae genomic sequence provides a starting point for understanding how a free-living, environmental organism emerged to become a significant human bacterial pathogen.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
PubMedID: 10952301
Gene_locus related to this paper: vibch-rtxAABH , vibch-lipas , vibch-VC0135 , vibch-VC0522 , vibch-VC1418 , vibch-VC1725 , vibch-VC1974 , vibch-VC1986 , vibch-VC2097 , vibch-VC2432 , vibch-VC2610 , vibch-VC2718 , vibch-VCA0063 , vibch-VCA0092 , vibch-VCA0490 , vibch-VCA0688 , vibch-VCA0754 , vibch-VCA0863 , vibch-y1892 , vibch-y2276

Title : Evidence for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and bacteria from genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima - Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Clayton RA , Gill SR , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Nelson WC , Ketchum KA , McDonald L , Utterback TR , Malek JA , Linher KD , Garrett MM , Stewart AM , Cotton MD , Pratt MS , Phillips CA , Richardson D , Heidelberg J , Sutton GG , Fleischmann RD , Eisen JA , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 399 :323 , 1999
Abstract : The 1,860,725-base-pair genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8 contains 1,877 predicted coding regions, 1,014 (54%) of which have functional assignments and 863 (46%) of which are of unknown function. Genome analysis reveals numerous pathways involved in degradation of sugars and plant polysaccharides, and 108 genes that have orthologues only in the genomes of other thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea. Of the Eubacteria sequenced to date, T. maritima has the highest percentage (24%) of genes that are most similar to archaeal genes. Eighty-one archaeal-like genes are clustered in 15 regions of the T. maritima genome that range in size from 4 to 20 kilobases. Conservation of gene order between T. maritima and Archaea in many of the clustered regions suggests that lateral gene transfer may have occurred between thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea.
ESTHER : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedSearch : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedID: 10360571
Gene_locus related to this paper: thema-ESTA , thema-q9x0d6 , thema-q9x042 , thema-TM0033 , thema-TM0053 , thema-TM0077 , thema-TM0336 , thema-TM1160 , thema-TM1350

Title : Intrathecal neostigmine and sufentanil for early labor analgesia - Nelson_1999_Anesthesiology_91_1293
Author(s) : Nelson KE , D'Angelo R , Foss ML , Meister GC , Hood DD , Eisenach JC
Ref : Anesthesiology , 91 :1293 , 1999
Abstract : BACKGROUND Recent efforts to improve the combined spinal epidural (CSE) technique have focused on adding opioids to other classes of analgesics. In this study, the authors used intrathecal neostigmine in combination with intrathecal sufentanil to investigate the usefulness of neostigmine for reducing side effects and prolonging the duration of sufentanil. METHODS: One hundred six healthy pregnant women in labor were enrolled in this study, which was divided into four phases. In all phases, patients received a CSE anesthetic while in the lateral position. In phase I, three groups of six women each received intrathecal neostigmine, 5, 10, or 20 microg, in an open-label, dose-escalating safety assessment. In phase II, 24 women received intrathecal sufentanil alone to establish an ED50 (dose that produces > 60 min of labor analgesia in 50% of patients). In phase III, an ED50 was established for sufentanil combined with a fixed dose of neostigmine (10 microg). In phase IV, 40 women received either twice the ED50 of sufentanil alone or twice the ED50 of sufentanil plus neostigmine, 10 microg. RESULTS: Neostigmine alone had no adverse effects on maternal vital signs, fetal heart rate, or Apgar scores. Neostigmine, 20 microg, produced analgesia in one patient and severe nausea and vomiting in another. The ED50 for intrathecal sufentanil alone was 4.1 +/- 0.31 microg, and the ED50 for intrathecal sufentanil combined with neostigmine, 10 microg, was 3.0 +/- 0.28 microg. The duration of analgesia and side effects from double these ED50s (sufentanil, 9 microg, or sufentanil, 6 microg, plus neostigmine, 10 microg) were similar between groups.
CONCLUSIONS: The 10-microg intrathecal neostigmine dose alone produced no analgesia or side effects, but reduced the ED50 of intrathecal sufentanil by approximately 25%. Additionally, doses approximately double these ED50s each produced a similar duration of analgesia and side effects, indicating intrathecal neostigmine shifts the dose-response curve for intrathecal sufentanil to the left.
ESTHER : Nelson_1999_Anesthesiology_91_1293
PubMedSearch : Nelson_1999_Anesthesiology_91_1293
PubMedID: 10551579

Title : Genome sequence of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 - White_1999_Science_286_1571
Author(s) : White O , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Gwinn ML , Nelson WC , Richardson DL , Moffat KS , Qin H , Jiang L , Pamphile W , Crosby M , Shen M , Vamathevan JJ , Lam P , McDonald L , Utterback T , Zalewski C , Makarova KS , Aravind L , Daly MJ , Minton KW , Fleischmann RD , Ketchum KA , Nelson KE , Salzberg S , Smith HO , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 286 :1571 , 1999
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is composed of two chromosomes (2,648,638 and 412,348 base pairs), a megaplasmid (177,466 base pairs), and a small plasmid (45,704 base pairs), yielding a total genome of 3,284, 156 base pairs. Multiple components distributed on the chromosomes and megaplasmid that contribute to the ability of D. radiodurans to survive under conditions of starvation, oxidative stress, and high amounts of DNA damage were identified. Deinococcus radiodurans represents an organism in which all systems for DNA repair, DNA damage export, desiccation and starvation recovery, and genetic redundancy are present in one cell.
ESTHER : White_1999_Science_286_1571
PubMedSearch : White_1999_Science_286_1571
PubMedID: 10567266
Gene_locus related to this paper: deira-aryla , deira-DR0165 , deira-DR0334 , deira-DR0553 , deira-DR0593 , deira-DR0654 , deira-DR0657 , deira-DR0779 , deira-DR0791 , deira-DR0945 , deira-DR0964 , deira-DR1053 , deira-DR1326 , deira-DR1351 , deira-DR1352 , deira-DR1403 , deira-DR1537 , deira-DR1915 , deira-DR1931 , deira-DR2078 , deira-DR2248 , deira-DR2478 , deira-DR2503 , deira-DR2506 , deira-DR2522 , deira-DR2549 , deira-DR2551 , deira-DRA0060 , deira-DRA0150 , deira-DRA0307 , deira-DRA0340 , deira-DRB0023 , deira-DRB0097 , deira-este1 , deira-este2 , deira-lip1 , deira-lip2 , deira-lipest , deira-metx

Title : The complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic, sulphate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus - Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
Author(s) : Klenk HP , Clayton RA , Tomb JF , White O , Nelson KE , Ketchum KA , Dodson RJ , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Richardson DL , Kerlavage AR , Graham DE , Kyrpides NC , Fleischmann RD , Quackenbush J , Lee NH , Sutton GG , Gill S , Kirkness EF , Dougherty BA , McKenney K , Adams MD , Loftus B , Peterson S , Reich CI , McNeil LK , Badger JH , Glodek A , Zhou L , Overbeek R , Gocayne JD , Weidman JF , McDonald L , Utterback T , Cotton MD , Spriggs T , Artiach P , Kaine BP , Sykes SM , Sadow PW , D'Andrea KP , Bowman C , Fujii C , Garland SA , Mason TM , Olsen GJ , Fraser CM , Smith HO , Woese CR , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 390 :364 , 1997
Abstract : Archaeoglobus fulgidus is the first sulphur-metabolizing organism to have its genome sequence determined. Its genome of 2,178,400 base pairs contains 2,436 open reading frames (ORFs). The information processing systems and the biosynthetic pathways for essential components (nucleotides, amino acids and cofactors) have extensive correlation with their counterparts in the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. The genomes of these two Archaea indicate dramatic differences in the way these organisms sense their environment, perform regulatory and transport functions, and gain energy. In contrast to M. jannaschii, A. fulgidus has fewer restriction-modification systems, and none of its genes appears to contain inteins. A quarter (651 ORFs) of the A. fulgidus genome encodes functionally uncharacterized yet conserved proteins, two-thirds of which are shared with M. jannaschii (428 ORFs). Another quarter of the genome encodes new proteins indicating substantial archaeal gene diversity.
ESTHER : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedSearch : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedID: 9389475
Gene_locus related to this paper: arcfu-AF0514 , arcfu-AF0675 , arcfu-AF1134 , arcfu-AF1563 , arcfu-AF1753 , arcfu-AF1763 , arcfu-est1 , arcfu-est2 , arcfu-est3 , arcfu-estea , arcfu-o28594 , arcfu-o29442 , arcfu-pcbd