Soares MB

References (7)

Title : A subchronic low-dose exposure of a glyphosate-based herbicide induces depressive and anxious-like behavior in mice: quercetin therapeutic approach - Bicca_2021_Environ.Sci.Pollut.Res.Int__
Author(s) : Bicca DF , Spiazzi CC , Ramalho JB , Soares MB , Cibin FWS
Ref : Environ Sci Pollut Res Int , : , 2021
Abstract : In this study, we investigated the possible role of pesticide exposure in contributing to neurological diseases such as depression. Here, we evaluated whether a subchronic low dose of a glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH) could induce alterations in the central nervous system, using the flavonoid quercetin as a therapeutic strategy. Forty mice were divided into four treatment groups: control, GBH, quercetin, and GBH+Quer groups and received 50 mg/kg of GBH solution, 30 mg/kg of quercetin, and/or vehicles for 30 days via gavage. After performing behavioral tests, such as the open field (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM), forced swim test (FST), and sucrose preference test (SPT), the mice were euthanized and their hippocampal tissues were collected to measure the levels of oxidative stress markers such as reactive species (RS), total antioxidant capacity (FRAP), reduced glutathione (GSH), and acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), as well as for histological evaluation. The GBH group showed anxious and depressive-like behavior in the EPM and FST tests, as well as increased levels of RS and decreased GSH levels in the hippocampus. Quercetin treatment in the GBH+Quer group allowed partial or total improvement in behavioral tests (EPM and FST) and in the levels of oxidative stress markers (RS and GSH). However, the quercetin group showed similar behavior to the GBH group after treatment. The results revealed that oral exposure to a subchronic low dose of GBH was capable of promoting effects on behavior and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of mice. In addition, despite quercetin having a neuroprotective role, caution is needed when considering the possible per se effects of its continuous supplementation.
ESTHER : Bicca_2021_Environ.Sci.Pollut.Res.Int__
PubMedSearch : Bicca_2021_Environ.Sci.Pollut.Res.Int__
PubMedID: 34254248

Title : Selenofuranoside improves long-term memory deficits in rats after exposure to monosodium glutamate: Involvement of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity - Ramalho_2017_Physiol.Behav_184_27
Author(s) : Ramalho JB , Izaguirry AP , Soares MB , Spiazzi CC , Pavin NF , Affeldt RF , Ludtke DS , Pinton S , Santos FW , Prigol M
Ref : Physiol Behav , 184 :27 , 2017
Abstract : Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects of this additive, including functional, learning, and behavioral alterations, have been observed in experimental animals and humans. Studies have shown learning and memory impairment in adult animals exposed to MSG. However, studies relating exposure to MSG to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities and memory damage are still scarce in the literature. The aim of the present study was to assess the possible protective effects of selenofuranoside, an organoselenium compound, against the impairment of long-term memory, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities, and oxidative stress after MSG exposure in rats. MSG (2g/kg) and/or selenofuranoside (5mg/kg) were administered orally to 5-week-old male Wistar rats for 10days. On the 10th day, after the administration of last dose of the drug(s), the rats were subjected to behavioral tests: the open-field test and step-down passive avoidance task (SDPA). The blood, liver, kidney, cortex, and hippocampus were removed to determine the oxidative stress parameters, such as the levels of reactive species, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, and endogenous nonenzymatic antioxidant content. Furthermore, the cortex and hippocampus were used to determine the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities. The results demonstrate that the administration of MSG led to long-term memory impairment, as shown in the SDPA task, and also hippocampal and cortical Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition. There were no alterations in the AChE activity and oxidative stress parameters. Treatment with selenofuranoside attenuated memory impairment associated with MSG exposure by improving the hippocampal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.
ESTHER : Ramalho_2017_Physiol.Behav_184_27
PubMedSearch : Ramalho_2017_Physiol.Behav_184_27
PubMedID: 29097195

Title : An insight into the sialome of Glossina morsitans morsitans - Alves-Silva_2010_BMC.Genomics_11_213
Author(s) : Alves-Silva J , Ribeiro JM , Van Den Abbeele J , Attardo G , Hao Z , Haines LR , Soares MB , Berriman M , Aksoy S , Lehane MJ
Ref : BMC Genomics , 11 :213 , 2010
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Blood feeding evolved independently in worms, arthropods and mammals. Among the adaptations to this peculiar diet, these animals developed an armament of salivary molecules that disarm their host's anti-bleeding defenses (hemostasis), inflammatory and immune reactions. Recent sialotranscriptome analyses (from the Greek sialo = saliva) of blood feeding insects and ticks have revealed that the saliva contains hundreds of polypeptides, many unique to their genus or family. Adult tsetse flies feed exclusively on vertebrate blood and are important vectors of human and animal diseases. Thus far, only limited information exists regarding the Glossina sialome, or any other fly belonging to the Hippoboscidae.
RESULTS: As part of the effort to sequence the genome of Glossina morsitans morsitans, several organ specific, high quality normalized cDNA libraries have been constructed, from which over 20,000 ESTs from an adult salivary gland library were sequenced. These ESTs have been assembled using previously described ESTs from the fat body and midgut libraries of the same fly, thus totaling 62,251 ESTs, which have been assembled into 16,743 clusters (8,506 of which had one or more EST from the salivary gland library). Coding sequences were obtained for 2,509 novel proteins, 1,792 of which had at least one EST expressed in the salivary glands. Despite library normalization, 59 transcripts were overrepresented in the salivary library indicating high levels of expression. This work presents a detailed analysis of the salivary protein families identified. Protein expression was confirmed by 2D gel electrophoresis, enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry. Concurrently, an initial attempt to determine the immunogenic properties of selected salivary proteins was undertaken.
CONCLUSIONS: The sialome of G. m. morsitans contains over 250 proteins that are possibly associated with blood feeding. This set includes alleles of previously described gene products, reveals new evidence that several salivary proteins are multigenic and identifies at least seven new polypeptide families unique to Glossina. Most of these proteins have no known function and thus, provide a discovery platform for the identification of novel pharmacologically active compounds, innovative vector-based vaccine targets, and immunological markers of vector exposure.
ESTHER : Alves-Silva_2010_BMC.Genomics_11_213
PubMedSearch : Alves-Silva_2010_BMC.Genomics_11_213
PubMedID: 20353571
Gene_locus related to this paper: glomm-d3tlg8 , glomm-d3tm45 , glomm-d3tmt4 , glomm-d3tn19 , glomm-d3tp96 , glomm-d3tpx7 , glomm-d3tqi3 , glomm-d3tru7 , glomm-d3ts61 , glomm-q2pz00 , glomm-d3tpl7 , glomm-d3ts28 , glomm-d3tnu0

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49

Title : Analysis of fat body transcriptome from the adult tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans - Attardo_2006_Insect.Mol.Biol_15_411
Author(s) : Attardo GM , Strickler-Dinglasan P , Perkin SA , Caler E , Bonaldo MF , Soares MB , El-Sayeed N , Aksoy S
Ref : Insect Molecular Biology , 15 :411 , 2006
Abstract : Tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidia) are vectors of pathogenic African trypanosomes. To develop a foundation for tsetse physiology, a normalized expressed sequence tag (EST) library was constructed from fat body tissue of immune-stimulated Glossina morsitans morsitans. Analysis of 20,257 high-quality ESTs yielded 6372 unique genes comprised of 3059 tentative consensus (TC) sequences and 3313 singletons (available at http:\/\/aksoylab.yale.edu). We analysed the putative fat body transcriptome based on homology to other gene products with known functions available in the public domain. In particular, we describe the immune-related products, reproductive function related yolk proteins and milk-gland protein, iron metabolism regulating ferritins and transferrin, and tsetse's major energy source proline biosynthesis. Expression analysis of the three yolk proteins indicates that all are detected in females, while only the yolk protein with similarity to lipases, is expressed in males. Milk gland protein, apparently important for larval nutrition, however, is primarily synthesized by accessory milk gland tissue.
ESTHER : Attardo_2006_Insect.Mol.Biol_15_411
PubMedSearch : Attardo_2006_Insect.Mol.Biol_15_411
PubMedID: 16907828
Gene_locus related to this paper: glomm-q2pz00

Title : The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) - Gerhard_2004_Genome.Res_14_2121
Author(s) : Gerhard DS , Wagner L , Feingold EA , Shenmen CM , Grouse LH , Schuler G , Klein SL , Old S , Rasooly R , Good P , Guyer M , Peck AM , Derge JG , Lipman D , Collins FS , Jang W , Sherry S , Feolo M , Misquitta L , Lee E , Rotmistrovsky K , Greenhut SF , Schaefer CF , Buetow K , Bonner TI , Haussler D , Kent J , Kiekhaus M , Furey T , Brent M , Prange C , Schreiber K , Shapiro N , Bhat NK , Hopkins RF , Hsie F , Driscoll T , Soares MB , Casavant TL , Scheetz TE , Brown-stein MJ , Usdin TB , Toshiyuki S , Carninci P , Piao Y , Dudekula DB , Ko MS , Kawakami K , Suzuki Y , Sugano S , Gruber CE , Smith MR , Simmons B , Moore T , Waterman R , Johnson SL , Ruan Y , Wei CL , Mathavan S , Gunaratne PH , Wu J , Garcia AM , Hulyk SW , Fuh E , Yuan Y , Sneed A , Kowis C , Hodgson A , Muzny DM , McPherson J , Gibbs RA , Fahey J , Helton E , Ketteman M , Madan A , Rodrigues S , Sanchez A , Whiting M , Madari A , Young AC , Wetherby KD , Granite SJ , Kwong PN , Brinkley CP , Pearson RL , Bouffard GG , Blakesly RW , Green ED , Dickson MC , Rodriguez AC , Grimwood J , Schmutz J , Myers RM , Butterfield YS , Griffith M , Griffith OL , Krzywinski MI , Liao N , Morin R , Palmquist D , Petrescu AS , Skalska U , Smailus DE , Stott JM , Schnerch A , Schein JE , Jones SJ , Holt RA , Baross A , Marra MA , Clifton S , Makowski KA , Bosak S , Malek J
Ref : Genome Res , 14 :2121 , 2004
Abstract : The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.
ESTHER : Gerhard_2004_Genome.Res_14_2121
PubMedSearch : Gerhard_2004_Genome.Res_14_2121
PubMedID: 15489334
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AFMID , human-CES4A , human-CES5A , human-NOTUM , human-SERAC1 , human-SERHL2 , human-TMEM53 , mouse-acot1 , mouse-adcl4 , mouse-Ces2f , mouse-Ces4a , mouse-notum , mouse-q6wqj1 , mouse-Q9DAI6 , mouse-rbbp9 , mouse-SERHL , mouse-srac1 , mouse-tmm53 , rat-abhd6 , rat-abhda , rat-abhea , rat-abheb , rat-Ldah , rat-cd029 , rat-estd , rat-Kansl3 , rat-nceh1 , ratno-acph , ratno-CMBL , mouse-b2rwd2 , rat-b5den3 , rat-ab17c

Title : Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences - Strausberg_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_16899
Author(s) : Strausberg RL , Feingold EA , Grouse LH , Derge JG , Klausner RD , Collins FS , Wagner L , Shenmen CM , Schuler GD , Altschul SF , Zeeberg B , Buetow KH , Schaefer CF , Bhat NK , Hopkins RF , Jordan H , Moore T , Max SI , Wang J , Hsieh F , Diatchenko L , Marusina K , Farmer AA , Rubin GM , Hong L , Stapleton M , Soares MB , Bonaldo MF , Casavant TL , Scheetz TE , Brownstein MJ , Usdin TB , Toshiyuki S , Carninci P , Prange C , Raha SS , Loquellano NA , Peters GJ , Abramson RD , Mullahy SJ , Bosak SA , McEwan PJ , McKernan KJ , Malek JA , Gunaratne PH , Richards S , Worley KC , Hale S , Garcia AM , Gay LJ , Hulyk SW , Villalon DK , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Lu X , Gibbs RA , Fahey J , Helton E , Ketteman M , Madan A , Rodrigues S , Sanchez A , Whiting M , Young AC , Shevchenko Y , Bouffard GG , Blakesley RW , Touchman JW , Green ED , Dickson MC , Rodriguez AC , Grimwood J , Schmutz J , Myers RM , Butterfield YS , Krzywinski MI , Skalska U , Smailus DE , Schnerch A , Schein JE , Jones SJ , Marra MA
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :16899 , 2002
Abstract : The National Institutes of Health Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) Program is a multiinstitutional effort to identify and sequence a cDNA clone containing a complete ORF for each human and mouse gene. ESTs were generated from libraries enriched for full-length cDNAs and analyzed to identify candidate full-ORF clones, which then were sequenced to high accuracy. The MGC has currently sequenced and verified the full ORF for a nonredundant set of >9,000 human and >6,000 mouse genes. Candidate full-ORF clones for an additional 7,800 human and 3,500 mouse genes also have been identified. All MGC sequences and clones are available without restriction through public databases and clone distribution networks (see http:mgc.nci.nih.gov).
ESTHER : Strausberg_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_16899
PubMedSearch : Strausberg_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_16899
PubMedID: 12477932
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-q3zcj6 , danre-OVCA2 , danre-q4qrh4 , danre-q4v960 , danre-q32ls6 , danre-q503e2 , ratno-CPVL , ratno-q3mhs0 , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q5fvr5 , ratno-q32q55 , xenla-a2bd54 , xenla-q2tap9 , xenla-q3kq37 , xenla-q3kq76 , xenla-q4klb6 , xenla-q32n48 , xenla-q32ns5 , xenla-q52l41 , xentr-q4va73 , danre-a7mbu9