Lai Z

References (14)

Title : Two Fluorescent Probes for Recognition of Acetylcholinesterase: Design, Synthesis, and Comparative Evaluation - Lin_2024_Molecules_29_
Author(s) : Lin X , Yi Q , Qing B , Lan W , Jiang F , Lai Z , Huang J , Liu Q , Jiang J , Wang M , Zou L , Huang X , Wang J
Ref : Molecules , 29 : , 2024
Abstract : In this study, two "on-off" probes (BF(2)-cur-Ben and BF(2)-cur-But) recognizing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were designed and synthesized. The obtained probes can achieve recognition of AChE with good selectivity and pH-independence with a linear range of 0.5~7 U/mL and 0.5~25 U/mL respectively. BF(2)-cur-Ben has a lower limit of detection (LOD) (0.031 U/mL), higher enzyme affinity (K(m) = 16 +/- 1.6 microM), and higher inhibitor sensitivity. A responsive mechanism of the probes for AChE was proposed based on HPLC and mass spectra (MS) experiments, as well as calculations. In molecular simulation, BF(2)-cur-Ben forms more hydrogen bonds (seven, while BF(2)-cur-But has only four) and thus has a more stable enzyme affinity, which is mirrored by the results of the comparison of K(m) values. These two probes could enable recognition of intracellular AChE and probe BF(2)-cur-Ben has superior cell membrane penetration due to its higher log p value. These probes can monitor the overexpression of AChE during apoptosis of lung cancer cells. The ability of BF(2)-cur-Ben to monitor AChE in vivo was confirmed by a zebrafish experiment.
ESTHER : Lin_2024_Molecules_29_
PubMedSearch : Lin_2024_Molecules_29_
PubMedID: 38731452

Title : Preoperative environment enrichment preserved neuroligin 1 expression possibly via epigenetic regulation to reduce postoperative cognitive dysfunction in mice - Min_2021_CNS.Neurosci.Ther__
Author(s) : Min J , Lai Z , Wang H , Zuo Z
Ref : CNS Neurosci Ther , : , 2021
Abstract : AIMS: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a common and significant syndrome. Our previous studies have shown that surgery reduces dendritic arborization and spine density and that environment enrichment (EE) reduces POCD. Neuroligin 1 is a postsynaptic protein involved in the formation of postsynaptic protein complex. This study was designed to determine the role of neuroligin 1 in the protection of EE against POCD and the mechanisms for EE to affect neuroligin 1 expression. METHODS: Eight-week-old C57BL/6J male mice with or without EE for 3, 7, or 14 days had right carotid artery exposure under isoflurane anesthesia. An anti-neuroligin 1 antibody at 1.5 microg/mouse was injected intracerebroventricularly at one and two weeks before the surgery. Mice were subjected to the Barnes maze and fear conditioning tests from one week after the surgery. Cerebral cortex and hippocampus were harvested after surgery. RESULTS: Mice with surgery had poorer performance in the Barnes maze and fear conditioning tests than control mice. EE for 2 weeks, but not EE for 3 or 7 days, improved the performance of surgery mice in these tests. Surgery reduced neuroligin 1 in the hippocampus. Preoperative EE for 2 weeks attenuated this reduction. The anti-neuroligin 1 antibody worsened the performance of mice with surgery plus EE in the Barnes maze and fear conditioning tests. Surgery increased histone deacetylase activity and decreased the acetylated histone in the hippocampus. EE attenuated these surgery effects. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that preoperative EE for 2 weeks reduces POCD. This effect may be mediated by preserving neuroligin 1 expression via attenuating surgery-induced epigenetic dysregulation in the brain.
ESTHER : Min_2021_CNS.Neurosci.Ther__
PubMedSearch : Min_2021_CNS.Neurosci.Ther__
PubMedID: 34882968

Title : The sunflower genome provides insights into oil metabolism, flowering and Asterid evolution - Badouin_2017_Nature_546_148
Author(s) : Badouin H , Gouzy J , Grassa CJ , Murat F , Staton SE , Cottret L , Lelandais-Briere C , Owens GL , Carrere S , Mayjonade B , Legrand L , Gill N , Kane NC , Bowers JE , Hubner S , Bellec A , Berard A , Berges H , Blanchet N , Boniface MC , Brunel D , Catrice O , Chaidir N , Claudel C , Donnadieu C , Faraut T , Fievet G , Helmstetter N , King M , Knapp SJ , Lai Z , Le Paslier MC , Lippi Y , Lorenzon L , Mandel JR , Marage G , Marchand G , Marquand E , Bret-Mestries E , Morien E , Nambeesan S , Nguyen T , Pegot-Espagnet P , Pouilly N , Raftis F , Sallet E , Schiex T , Thomas J , Vandecasteele C , Vares D , Vear F , Vautrin S , Crespi M , Mangin B , Burke JM , Salse J , Munos S , Vincourt P , Rieseberg LH , Langlade NB
Ref : Nature , 546 :148 , 2017
Abstract : The domesticated sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., is a global oil crop that has promise for climate change adaptation, because it can maintain stable yields across a wide variety of environmental conditions, including drought. Even greater resilience is achievable through the mining of resistance alleles from compatible wild sunflower relatives, including numerous extremophile species. Here we report a high-quality reference for the sunflower genome (3.6 gigabases), together with extensive transcriptomic data from vegetative and floral organs. The genome mostly consists of highly similar, related sequences and required single-molecule real-time sequencing technologies for successful assembly. Genome analyses enabled the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the Asterids, further establishing the existence of a whole-genome triplication at the base of the Asterids II clade and a sunflower-specific whole-genome duplication around 29 million years ago. An integrative approach combining quantitative genetics, expression and diversity data permitted development of comprehensive gene networks for two major breeding traits, flowering time and oil metabolism, and revealed new candidate genes in these networks. We found that the genomic architecture of flowering time has been shaped by the most recent whole-genome duplication, which suggests that ancient paralogues can remain in the same regulatory networks for dozens of millions of years. This genome represents a cornerstone for future research programs aiming to exploit genetic diversity to improve biotic and abiotic stress resistance and oil production, while also considering agricultural constraints and human nutritional needs.
ESTHER : Badouin_2017_Nature_546_148
PubMedSearch : Badouin_2017_Nature_546_148
PubMedID: 28538728
Gene_locus related to this paper: helan-a0a251rty5 , helan-a0a251rwi0 , helan-a0a251s4p0 , helan-a0a251tv75 , helan-a0a251s253 , helan-a0a251ts58 , helan-a0a251vmq8 , helan-a0a251rur6 , helan-a0a251ve88 , helan-a0a251rzb7 , helan-a0a251uh88 , helan-a0a251ux90 , helan-a0a251sb83 , helan-a0a251txv8 , helan-a0a251u1d0 , helan-a0a251uwi4 , helan-a0a251uwk5 , helan-a0a251uxe9 , helan-a0a251vi64

Title : Isolation, diversity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi harboured in Huperzia serrata from Jinggang Mountain, China - Wang_2016_World.J.Microbiol.Biotechnol_32_20
Author(s) : Wang Y , Lai Z , Li XX , Yan RM , Zhang ZB , Yang HL , Zhu D
Ref : World J Microbiol Biotechnol , 32 :20 , 2016
Abstract : Huperzia serrata has many important medicinal properties with proven pharmacological potential. Some of these properties may be mediated by its endophytic fungi. To test this hypothesis, in the present study, we provided a first insights into evaluating the species composition and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi of H. serrata from the regional at Jinggang Mountain in southeastern China. A total number of 885 fungal isolates distributed across 44 genera and 118 putative species were obtained from 1422 fragments of fine H. serrata roots, stems and leaves base on ITS-rDNA sequences BLAST analysis. The endophytic fungi were phylogenetically diverse and species-rich, with high rate of colonization and isolation. The assemble of endophytic fungi consisted mainly of Ascomycota (97.15 %), followed by Basidiomycota (1.92 %) and unknown fungal species (0.90 %). Colletotrichum (64.29 %), Phyllosticta (3.39 %), Hypoxylon (2.81 %), Xylaria (2.25 %) and Nigrospora (2.04 %) were the most abundant genera, whereas the remaining genera were infrequent groups. Although, roots yielded low abundance strains, the diverse and species-rich were both higher than that of stems and leaves. In addition, out of the 247 endophytic fungi strains determinated, 221 fungal extracts showed AChE inhibition activities in vitro. Among them, 22 endophytic fungi strains achieved high inhibitory activity (>/=50 %) on AChE which belongs to 13 genera and five incertae sedis strains. Four endophytic fungi designated as JS4 (Colletotrichum spp.), FL14 (Ascomycota spp.), FL9 (Sarcosomataceae spp.) and FL7 (Dothideomycetes spp.) were displayed highly active (>/=80 %) against AChE, which the inhibition effects were even more intense than the positive control. Our findings highlight that H. serrata grown in Jinggang Mountain harbors a rich and fascinating endophytic fungus community with potential AChE inhibitory activity, which could further broaden the natural acetylcholinesterase inhibitors resources used for Alzheimer's disease treatment.
ESTHER : Wang_2016_World.J.Microbiol.Biotechnol_32_20
PubMedSearch : Wang_2016_World.J.Microbiol.Biotechnol_32_20
PubMedID: 26745980

Title : A first genome assembly of the barley fungal pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. teres - Ellwood_2010_Genome.Biol_11_R109
Author(s) : Ellwood SR , Liu Z , Syme RA , Lai Z , Hane JK , Keiper F , Moffat CS , Oliver RP , Friesen TL
Ref : Genome Biol , 11 :R109 , 2010
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Pyrenophora teres f. teres is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen and the cause of one of barley's most important diseases, net form of net blotch. Here we report the first genome assembly for this species based solely on short Solexa sequencing reads of isolate 0-1. The assembly was validated by comparison to BAC sequences, ESTs, orthologous genes and by PCR, and complemented by cytogenetic karyotyping and the first genome-wide genetic map for P. teres f. teres.
RESULTS: The total assembly was 41.95 Mbp and contains 11,799 gene models of 50 amino acids or more. Comparison against two sequenced BACs showed that complex regions with a high GC content assembled effectively. Electrophoretic karyotyping showed distinct chromosomal polymorphisms between isolates 0-1 and 15A, and cytological karyotyping confirmed the presence of at least nine chromosomes. The genetic map spans 2477.7 cM and is composed of 243 markers in 25 linkage groups, and incorporates simple sequence repeat markers developed from the assembly. Among predicted genes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and efflux pumps in particular appear to have undergone a P. teres f. teres-specific expansion of non-orthologous gene families.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that paired-end Solexa sequencing can successfully capture coding regions of a filamentous fungal genome. The assembly contains a plethora of predicted genes that have been implicated in a necrotrophic lifestyle and pathogenicity and presents a significant resource for examining the bases for P. teres f. teres pathogenicity.
ESTHER : Ellwood_2010_Genome.Biol_11_R109
PubMedSearch : Ellwood_2010_Genome.Biol_11_R109
PubMedID: 21067574
Gene_locus related to this paper: pyrtr-b2vv71 , pyrtr-b2w1y6 , pyrtr-b2w948 , pyrtr-b2wbz8 , pyrtr-b2wcq8 , pyrtr-b2wgg5 , pyrtr-dapb , pyrtt-e3rcw4 , pyrtt-e3rfb1 , pyrtt-e3rfu0 , pyrtt-e3rgg7 , pyrtt-e3rh98 , pyrtt-e3ril1 , pyrtt-e3rjq5 , pyrtt-e3rkg6 , pyrtt-e3rkr9 , pyrtt-e3rl87 , pyrtt-e3rp29 , pyrtt-e3rpe8 , pyrtt-e3rqg8 , pyrtt-e3rrt3 , pyrtt-e3rs40 , pyrtt-e3rth6 , pyrtt-e3rtt7 , pyrtt-e3ruq0 , pyrtt-e3ruw6 , pyrtt-e3rvm2 , pyrtt-e3rwp7 , pyrtt-e3rxf7 , pyrtt-e3s2m6 , pyrtt-e3s5q8 , pyrtt-e3s8r6 , pyrtt-e3s292 , pyrtt-e3s479 , pyrtt-e3s701 , pyrtt-e3s716 , pyrtt-e3s922 , pyrtt-e3sa06 , pyrtt-e3ru14 , pyrtt-e3rg15 , pyrtt-e3rxy1 , pyrtr-b2vyg1 , pyrtt-e3rnt0 , pyrtt-e3rwh1 , pyrtt-e3rtw2 , pyrtt-e3s3k4 , pyrtt-e3rs45 , pyrtr-b2w571 , pyrtt-e3s9z0 , pyrtt-e3rxj8 , pyrtt-e3s3p6 , pyrtt-e3rqx0 , pyrtt-e3rpq8 , pyrtt-e3rx11 , pyrtr-b2vzr5 , pyrtt-e3s4g0 , pyrtt-e3rqw7 , pyrtt-e3rgu8

Title : The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae - Holt_2002_Science_298_129
Author(s) : Holt RA , Subramanian GM , Halpern A , Sutton GG , Charlab R , Nusskern DR , Wincker P , Clark AG , Ribeiro JM , Wides R , Salzberg SL , Loftus B , Yandell M , Majoros WH , Rusch DB , Lai Z , Kraft CL , Abril JF , Anthouard V , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Baden H , de Berardinis V , Baldwin D , Benes V , Biedler J , Blass C , Bolanos R , Boscus D , Barnstead M , Cai S , Center A , Chaturverdi K , Christophides GK , Chrystal MA , Clamp M , Cravchik A , Curwen V , Dana A , Delcher A , Dew I , Evans CA , Flanigan M , Grundschober-Freimoser A , Friedli L , Gu Z , Guan P , Guigo R , Hillenmeyer ME , Hladun SL , Hogan JR , Hong YS , Hoover J , Jaillon O , Ke Z , Kodira C , Kokoza E , Koutsos A , Letunic I , Levitsky A , Liang Y , Lin JJ , Lobo NF , Lopez JR , Malek JA , McIntosh TC , Meister S , Miller J , Mobarry C , Mongin E , Murphy SD , O'Brochta DA , Pfannkoch C , Qi R , Regier MA , Remington K , Shao H , Sharakhova MV , Sitter CD , Shetty J , Smith TJ , Strong R , Sun J , Thomasova D , Ton LQ , Topalis P , Tu Z , Unger MF , Walenz B , Wang A , Wang J , Wang M , Wang X , Woodford KJ , Wortman JR , Wu M , Yao A , Zdobnov EM , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zhao S , Zhu SC , Zhimulev I , Coluzzi M , della Torre A , Roth CW , Louis C , Kalush F , Mural RJ , Myers EW , Adams MD , Smith HO , Broder S , Gardner MJ , Fraser CM , Birney E , Bork P , Brey PT , Venter JC , Weissenbach J , Kafatos FC , Collins FH , Hoffman SL
Ref : Science , 298 :129 , 2002
Abstract : Anopheles gambiae is the principal vector of malaria, a disease that afflicts more than 500 million people and causes more than 1 million deaths each year. Tenfold shotgun sequence coverage was obtained from the PEST strain of A. gambiae and assembled into scaffolds that span 278 million base pairs. A total of 91% of the genome was organized in 303 scaffolds; the largest scaffold was 23.1 million base pairs. There was substantial genetic variation within this strain, and the apparent existence of two haplotypes of approximately equal frequency ("dual haplotypes") in a substantial fraction of the genome likely reflects the outbred nature of the PEST strain. The sequence produced a conservative inference of more than 400,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that showed a markedly bimodal density distribution. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed strong evidence for about 14,000 protein-encoding transcripts. Prominent expansions in specific families of proteins likely involved in cell adhesion and immunity were noted. An expressed sequence tag analysis of genes regulated by blood feeding provided insights into the physiological adaptations of a hematophagous insect.
ESTHER : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedSearch : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedID: 12364791
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-a0nb77 , anoga-a0nbp6 , anoga-a0neb7 , anoga-a0nei9 , anoga-a0nej0 , anoga-a0ngj1 , anoga-a7ut12 , anoga-a7uuz9 , anoga-ACHE1 , anoga-ACHE2 , anoga-agCG44620 , anoga-agCG44666 , anoga-agCG45273 , anoga-agCG45279 , anoga-agCG45511 , anoga-agCG46741 , anoga-agCG47651 , anoga-agCG47655 , anoga-agCG47661 , anoga-agCG47690 , anoga-agCG48797 , anoga-AGCG49362 , anoga-agCG49462 , anoga-agCG49870 , anoga-agCG49872 , anoga-agCG49876 , anoga-agCG50851 , anoga-agCG51879 , anoga-agCG52383 , anoga-agCG54954 , anoga-AGCG55021 , anoga-agCG55401 , anoga-agCG55408 , anoga-agCG56978 , anoga-ebiG239 , anoga-ebiG2660 , anoga-ebiG5718 , anoga-ebiG5974 , anoga-ebiG8504 , anoga-ebiG8742 , anoga-glita , anoga-nrtac , anoga-q5tpv0 , anoga-Q5TVS6 , anoga-q7pm39 , anoga-q7ppw9 , anoga-q7pq17 , anoga-Q7PQT0 , anoga-q7q8m4 , anoga-q7q626 , anoga-q7qa14 , anoga-q7qa52 , anoga-q7qal7 , anoga-q7qbj0 , anoga-f5hl20 , anoga-q7qkh2 , anoga-a0a1s4h1y7 , anoga-q7q887

Title : Comparative genome and proteome analysis of Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster - Zdobnov_2002_Science_298_149
Author(s) : Zdobnov EM , von Mering C , Letunic I , Torrents D , Suyama M , Copley RR , Christophides GK , Thomasova D , Holt RA , Subramanian GM , Mueller HM , Dimopoulos G , Law JH , Wells MA , Birney E , Charlab R , Halpern AL , Kokoza E , Kraft CL , Lai Z , Lewis S , Louis C , Barillas-Mury C , Nusskern D , Rubin GM , Salzberg SL , Sutton GG , Topalis P , Wides R , Wincker P , Yandell M , Collins FH , Ribeiro J , Gelbart WM , Kafatos FC , Bork P
Ref : Science , 298 :149 , 2002
Abstract : Comparison of the genomes and proteomes of the two diptera Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster, which diverged about 250 million years ago, reveals considerable similarities. However, numerous differences are also observed; some of these must reflect the selection and subsequent adaptation associated with different ecologies and life strategies. Almost half of the genes in both genomes are interpreted as orthologs and show an average sequence identity of about 56%, which is slightly lower than that observed between the orthologs of the pufferfish and human (diverged about 450 million years ago). This indicates that these two insects diverged considerably faster than vertebrates. Aligned sequences reveal that orthologous genes have retained only half of their intron/exon structure, indicating that intron gains or losses have occurred at a rate of about one per gene per 125 million years. Chromosomal arms exhibit significant remnants of homology between the two species, although only 34% of the genes colocalize in small "microsyntenic" clusters, and major interarm transfers as well as intra-arm shuffling of gene order are detected.
ESTHER : Zdobnov_2002_Science_298_149
PubMedSearch : Zdobnov_2002_Science_298_149
PubMedID: 12364792

Title : A comparison of whole-genome shotgun-derived mouse chromosome 16 and the human genome - Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
Author(s) : Mural RJ , Adams MD , Myers EW , Smith HO , Miklos GL , Wides R , Halpern A , Li PW , Sutton GG , Nadeau J , Salzberg SL , Holt RA , Kodira CD , Lu F , Chen L , Deng Z , Evangelista CC , Gan W , Heiman TJ , Li J , Li Z , Merkulov GV , Milshina NV , Naik AK , Qi R , Shue BC , Wang A , Wang J , Wang X , Yan X , Ye J , Yooseph S , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhu SC , Biddick K , Bolanos R , Delcher AL , Dew IM , Fasulo D , Flanigan MJ , Huson DH , Kravitz SA , Miller JR , Mobarry CM , Reinert K , Remington KA , Zhang Q , Zheng XH , Nusskern DR , Lai Z , Lei Y , Zhong W , Yao A , Guan P , Ji RR , Gu Z , Wang ZY , Zhong F , Xiao C , Chiang CC , Yandell M , Wortman JR , Amanatides PG , Hladun SL , Pratts EC , Johnson JE , Dodson KL , Woodford KJ , Evans CA , Gropman B , Rusch DB , Venter E , Wang M , Smith TJ , Houck JT , Tompkins DE , Haynes C , Jacob D , Chin SH , Allen DR , Dahlke CE , Sanders R , Li K , Liu X , Levitsky AA , Majoros WH , Chen Q , Xia AC , Lopez JR , Donnelly MT , Newman MH , Glodek A , Kraft CL , Nodell M , Ali F , An HJ , Baldwin-Pitts D , Beeson KY , Cai S , Carnes M , Carver A , Caulk PM , Center A , Chen YH , Cheng ML , Coyne MD , Crowder M , Danaher S , Davenport LB , Desilets R , Dietz SM , Doup L , Dullaghan P , Ferriera S , Fosler CR , Gire HC , Gluecksmann A , Gocayne JD , Gray J , Hart B , Haynes J , Hoover J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Johns D , Kline L , Ma DS , MacCawley S , Magoon A , Mann F , May D , McIntosh TC , Mehta S , Moy L , Moy MC , Murphy BJ , Murphy SD , Nelson KA , Nuri Z , Parker KA , Prudhomme AC , Puri VN , Qureshi H , Raley JC , Reardon MS , Regier MA , Rogers YH , Romblad DL , Schutz J , Scott JL , Scott R , Sitter CD , Smallwood M , Sprague AC , Stewart E , Strong RV , Suh E , Sylvester K , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tsonis C , Wang G , Williams MS , Williams SM , Windsor SM , Wolfe K , Wu MM , Zaveri J , Chaturvedi K , Gabrielian AE , Ke Z , Sun J , Subramanian G , Venter JC , Pfannkoch CM , Barnstead M , Stephenson LD
Ref : Science , 296 :1661 , 2002
Abstract : The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.
ESTHER : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedSearch : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedID: 12040188
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-ABH15 , mouse-Ces3b , mouse-Ces4a , mouse-dpp4 , mouse-FAP , mouse-Lipg , mouse-Q8C1A9 , mouse-rbbp9 , mouse-SERHL , mouse-SPG21 , mouse-w4vsp6

Title : The sequence of the human genome - Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
Author(s) : Venter JC , Adams MD , Myers EW , Li PW , Mural RJ , Sutton GG , Smith HO , Yandell M , Evans CA , Holt RA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides P , Ballew RM , Huson DH , Wortman JR , Zhang Q , Kodira CD , Zheng XH , Chen L , Skupski M , Subramanian G , Thomas PD , Zhang J , Gabor Miklos GL , Nelson C , Broder S , Clark AG , Nadeau J , McKusick VA , Zinder N , Levine AJ , Roberts RJ , Simon M , Slayman C , Hunkapiller M , Bolanos R , Delcher A , Dew I , Fasulo D , Flanigan M , Florea L , Halpern A , Hannenhalli S , Kravitz S , Levy S , Mobarry C , Reinert K , Remington K , Abu-Threideh J , Beasley E , Biddick K , Bonazzi V , Brandon R , Cargill M , Chandramouliswaran I , Charlab R , Chaturvedi K , Deng Z , Di Francesco V , Dunn P , Eilbeck K , Evangelista C , Gabrielian AE , Gan W , Ge W , Gong F , Gu Z , Guan P , Heiman TJ , Higgins ME , Ji RR , Ke Z , Ketchum KA , Lai Z , Lei Y , Li Z , Li J , Liang Y , Lin X , Lu F , Merkulov GV , Milshina N , Moore HM , Naik AK , Narayan VA , Neelam B , Nusskern D , Rusch DB , Salzberg S , Shao W , Shue B , Sun J , Wang Z , Wang A , Wang X , Wang J , Wei M , Wides R , Xiao C , Yan C , Yao A , Ye J , Zhan M , Zhang W , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhong F , Zhong W , Zhu S , Zhao S , Gilbert D , Baumhueter S , Spier G , Carter C , Cravchik A , Woodage T , Ali F , An H , Awe A , Baldwin D , Baden H , Barnstead M , Barrow I , Beeson K , Busam D , Carver A , Center A , Cheng ML , Curry L , Danaher S , Davenport L , Desilets R , Dietz S , Dodson K , Doup L , Ferriera S , Garg N , Gluecksmann A , Hart B , Haynes J , Haynes C , Heiner C , Hladun S , Hostin D , Houck J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Johnson J , Kalush F , Kline L , Koduru S , Love A , Mann F , May D , McCawley S , McIntosh T , McMullen I , Moy M , Moy L , Murphy B , Nelson K , Pfannkoch C , Pratts E , Puri V , Qureshi H , Reardon M , Rodriguez R , Rogers YH , Romblad D , Ruhfel B , Scott R , Sitter C , Smallwood M , Stewart E , Strong R , Suh E , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tse S , Vech C , Wang G , Wetter J , Williams S , Williams M , Windsor S , Winn-Deen E , Wolfe K , Zaveri J , Zaveri K , Abril JF , Guigo R , Campbell MJ , Sjolander KV , Karlak B , Kejariwal A , Mi H , Lazareva B , Hatton T , Narechania A , Diemer K , Muruganujan A , Guo N , Sato S , Bafna V , Istrail S , Lippert R , Schwartz R , Walenz B , Yooseph S , Allen D , Basu A , Baxendale J , Blick L , Caminha M , Carnes-Stine J , Caulk P , Chiang YH , Coyne M , Dahlke C , Mays A , Dombroski M , Donnelly M , Ely D , Esparham S , Fosler C , Gire H , Glanowski S , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gorokhov M , Graham K , Gropman B , Harris M , Heil J , Henderson S , Hoover J , Jennings D , Jordan C , Jordan J , Kasha J , Kagan L , Kraft C , Levitsky A , Lewis M , Liu X , Lopez J , Ma D , Majoros W , McDaniel J , Murphy S , Newman M , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nodell M , Pan S , Peck J , Peterson M , Rowe W , Sanders R , Scott J , Simpson M , Smith T , Sprague A , Stockwell T , Turner R , Venter E , Wang M , Wen M , Wu D , Wu M , Xia A , Zandieh A , Zhu X
Ref : Science , 291 :1304 , 2001
Abstract : A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.
ESTHER : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedSearch : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedID: 11181995
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-BCHE , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CMBL , human-ABHD17A , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LYPLAL1 , human-NDRG2 , human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X , human-NLGN4Y , human-PAFAH2 , human-PREPL , human-RBBP9 , human-SPG21

Title : A whole-genome assembly of Drosophila - Myers_2000_Science_287_2196
Author(s) : Myers EW , Sutton GG , Delcher AL , Dew IM , Fasulo DP , Flanigan MJ , Kravitz SA , Mobarry CM , Reinert KH , Remington KA , Anson EL , Bolanos RA , Chou HH , Jordan CM , Halpern AL , Lonardi S , Beasley EM , Brandon RC , Chen L , Dunn PJ , Lai Z , Liang Y , Nusskern DR , Zhan M , Zhang Q , Zheng X , Rubin GM , Adams MD , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2196 , 2000
Abstract : We report on the quality of a whole-genome assembly of Drosophila melanogaster and the nature of the computer algorithms that accomplished it. Three independent external data sources essentially agree with and support the assembly's sequence and ordering of contigs across the euchromatic portion of the genome. In addition, there are isolated contigs that we believe represent nonrepetitive pockets within the heterochromatin of the centromeres. Comparison with a previously sequenced 2.9- megabase region indicates that sequencing accuracy within nonrepetitive segments is greater than 99. 99% without manual curation. As such, this initial reconstruction of the Drosophila sequence should be of substantial value to the scientific community.
ESTHER : Myers_2000_Science_287_2196
PubMedSearch : Myers_2000_Science_287_2196
PubMedID: 10731133

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3

Title : Chromosome 2 sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum - Gardner_1998_Science_282_1126
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Tettelin H , Carucci DJ , Cummings LM , Aravind L , Koonin EV , Shallom S , Mason T , Yu K , Fujii C , Pederson J , Shen K , Jing J , Aston C , Lai Z , Schwartz DC , Pertea M , Salzberg S , Zhou L , Sutton GG , Clayton R , White O , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Hoffman SL
Ref : Science , 282 :1126 , 1998
Abstract : Chromosome 2 of Plasmodium falciparum was sequenced; this sequence contains 947,103 base pairs and encodes 210 predicted genes. In comparison with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, chromosome 2 has a lower gene density, introns are more frequent, and proteins are markedly enriched in nonglobular domains. A family of surface proteins, rifins, that may play a role in antigenic variation was identified. The complete sequencing of chromosome 2 has shown that sequencing of the A+T-rich P. falciparum genome is technically feasible.
ESTHER : Gardner_1998_Science_282_1126
PubMedSearch : Gardner_1998_Science_282_1126
PubMedID: 9804551

Title : Tetrahydroaminoacridine induces opposite changes in muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in rat brain - Nilsson-Hakansson_1990_Eur.J.Pharmacol_186_301
Author(s) : Nilsson-Hakansson L , Lai Z , Nordberg A
Ref : European Journal of Pharmacology , 186 :301 , 1990
Abstract : Rats were treated with 10 mg/kg tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) twice daily for 14 days. THA (10 mg/kg) induced a significant decrease in the number of muscarinic receptors (both M1 and M2) in the cortex and striatum, whereas the number of nicotinic receptors in the cortex and hippocampus increased. Rats treated with physostigmine (0.9 mg/kg) showed a reduced number of muscarinic receptors, but no change in nicotinic receptors. The results indicate that treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors can induce opposite changes in brain muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in vivo.
ESTHER : Nilsson-Hakansson_1990_Eur.J.Pharmacol_186_301
PubMedSearch : Nilsson-Hakansson_1990_Eur.J.Pharmacol_186_301
PubMedID: 2289530

Title : Multiple actions of THA on cholinergic neurotransmission in Alzheimer brains - Nordberg_1989_Prog.Clin.Biol.Res_317_1169
Author(s) : Nordberg A , Nilsson-Hakansson L , Adem A , Lai Z , Winblad B
Ref : Prog Clin Biol Res , 317 :1169 , 1989
Abstract : 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine (THA) is a cholinesterase inhibitor presently under investigation in clinical trials for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, senile dementia of Alzheimer type (AD/SDAT). To further analyse the underlying mechanisms for its effect in human brain, an in vitro model which allows measurement of acetylcholine (ACh) release from human postmortem brain slices has been used. In control cortical tissue THA induces a decreased release of ACh probably due to negative feedback mechanisms mediated via presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors. In AD/SDAT cortex THA enhances the release of ACh to control level. This effect is prevented by nicotinic or muscarinic receptor antagonists, which suggest receptor mechanisms involving both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Subchronic treatment of rats with THA (10 mg/kg sc twice daily) or physostigmine (0.9 mg/kg sc five times daily) causes a significant increase in the number of high affinity nicotinic receptors in the cortex of THA treated rats whereas no change is found in the physostigmine treated rats. The number of muscarinic receptors are decreased following both THA and physostigmine treatment.
ESTHER : Nordberg_1989_Prog.Clin.Biol.Res_317_1169
PubMedSearch : Nordberg_1989_Prog.Clin.Biol.Res_317_1169
PubMedID: 2557636