Loftus B

References (6)

Title : The transcriptional landscape and small RNAs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium - Kroger_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_E1277
Author(s) : Kroger C , Dillon SC , Cameron AD , Papenfort K , Sivasankaran SK , Hokamp K , Chao Y , Sittka A , Hebrard M , Handler K , Colgan A , Leekitcharoenphon P , Langridge GC , Lohan AJ , Loftus B , Lucchini S , Ussery DW , Dorman CJ , Thomson NR , Vogel J , Hinton JC
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 109 :E1277 , 2012
Abstract : More than 50 y of research have provided great insight into the physiology, metabolism, and molecular biology of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), but important gaps in our knowledge remain. It is clear that a precise choreography of gene expression is required for Salmonella infection, but basic genetic information such as the global locations of transcription start sites (TSSs) has been lacking. We combined three RNA-sequencing techniques and two sequencing platforms to generate a robust picture of transcription in S. Typhimurium. Differential RNA sequencing identified 1,873 TSSs on the chromosome of S. Typhimurium SL1344 and 13% of these TSSs initiated antisense transcripts. Unique findings include the TSSs of the virulence regulators phoP, slyA, and invF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RNA polymerase was bound to 70% of the TSSs, and two-thirds of these TSSs were associated with sigma(70) (including phoP, slyA, and invF) from which we identified the -10 and -35 motifs of sigma(70)-dependent S. Typhimurium gene promoters. Overall, we corrected the location of important genes and discovered 18 times more promoters than identified previously. S. Typhimurium expresses 140 small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) at early stationary phase, including 60 newly identified sRNAs. Almost half of the experimentally verified sRNAs were found to be unique to the Salmonella genus, and <20% were found throughout the Enterobacteriaceae. This description of the transcriptional map of SL1344 advances our understanding of S. Typhimurium, arguably the most important bacterial infection model.
ESTHER : Kroger_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_E1277
PubMedSearch : Kroger_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_E1277
PubMedID: 22538806

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49

Title : The genome of the protist parasite Entamoeba histolytica - Loftus_2005_Nature_433_865
Author(s) : Loftus B , Anderson I , Davies R , Alsmark UC , Samuelson J , Amedeo P , Roncaglia P , Berriman M , Hirt RP , Mann BJ , Nozaki T , Suh B , Pop M , Duchene M , Ackers J , Tannich E , Leippe M , Hofer M , Bruchhaus I , Willhoeft U , Bhattacharya A , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Hance Z , Harris B , Harris D , Jagels K , Moule S , Mungall K , Ormond D , Squares R , Whitehead S , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Norbertczak H , Price C , Wang Z , Guillen N , Gilchrist C , Stroup SE , Bhattacharya S , Lohia A , Foster PG , Sicheritz-Ponten T , Weber C , Singh U , Mukherjee C , El-Sayed NM , Petri WA, Jr. , Clark CG , Embley TM , Barrell B , Fraser CM , Hall N
Ref : Nature , 433 :865 , 2005
Abstract : Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal parasite and the causative agent of amoebiasis, which is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Here we present the genome of E. histolytica, which reveals a variety of metabolic adaptations shared with two other amitochondrial protist pathogens: Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis. These adaptations include reduction or elimination of most mitochondrial metabolic pathways and the use of oxidative stress enzymes generally associated with anaerobic prokaryotes. Phylogenomic analysis identifies evidence for lateral gene transfer of bacterial genes into the E. histolytica genome, the effects of which centre on expanding aspects of E. histolytica's metabolic repertoire. The presence of these genes and the potential for novel metabolic pathways in E. histolytica may allow for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. The genome encodes a large number of novel receptor kinases and contains expansions of a variety of gene families, including those associated with virulence. Additional genome features include an abundance of tandemly repeated transfer-RNA-containing arrays, which may have a structural function in the genome. Analysis of the genome provides new insights into the workings and genome evolution of a major human pathogen.
ESTHER : Loftus_2005_Nature_433_865
PubMedSearch : Loftus_2005_Nature_433_865
PubMedID: 15729342
Gene_locus related to this paper: entds-b0efg6 , entds-b0egj2 , enthi-b1n4x1 , enthi-b1n449 , enthi-b1n456 , enthi-c4lsp4 , enthi-c4lte6 , enthi-c4lu03 , enthi-c4lu54 , enthi-c4lve4 , enthi-c4lwe1 , enthi-c4m0c3 , enthi-c4m0e4 , enthi-c4m1e7 , enthi-c4m2a9 , enthi-c4m2i4 , enthi-c4m3r1 , enthi-c4m4l3 , enthi-c4m6g0 , enthi-c4m6k3 , enthi-c4m7k7 , enthi-c4m7n4 , enthi-c4m7v0 , enthi-c4m8y5 , enthi-c4m793 , enthi-c4mb48 , enthi-DPP , enthi-q50rh1 , enthi-q50ya6 , enthi-q51a37 , enthi-q51aw6 , enthi-q51ch3 , enthi-q51cz6 , enthi-q51ds3 , enthi-q513q8 , enthi-q513w3 , enthi-q519v1

Title : The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae - Holt_2002_Science_298_129
Author(s) : Holt RA , Subramanian GM , Halpern A , Sutton GG , Charlab R , Nusskern DR , Wincker P , Clark AG , Ribeiro JM , Wides R , Salzberg SL , Loftus B , Yandell M , Majoros WH , Rusch DB , Lai Z , Kraft CL , Abril JF , Anthouard V , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Baden H , de Berardinis V , Baldwin D , Benes V , Biedler J , Blass C , Bolanos R , Boscus D , Barnstead M , Cai S , Center A , Chaturverdi K , Christophides GK , Chrystal MA , Clamp M , Cravchik A , Curwen V , Dana A , Delcher A , Dew I , Evans CA , Flanigan M , Grundschober-Freimoser A , Friedli L , Gu Z , Guan P , Guigo R , Hillenmeyer ME , Hladun SL , Hogan JR , Hong YS , Hoover J , Jaillon O , Ke Z , Kodira C , Kokoza E , Koutsos A , Letunic I , Levitsky A , Liang Y , Lin JJ , Lobo NF , Lopez JR , Malek JA , McIntosh TC , Meister S , Miller J , Mobarry C , Mongin E , Murphy SD , O'Brochta DA , Pfannkoch C , Qi R , Regier MA , Remington K , Shao H , Sharakhova MV , Sitter CD , Shetty J , Smith TJ , Strong R , Sun J , Thomasova D , Ton LQ , Topalis P , Tu Z , Unger MF , Walenz B , Wang A , Wang J , Wang M , Wang X , Woodford KJ , Wortman JR , Wu M , Yao A , Zdobnov EM , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zhao S , Zhu SC , Zhimulev I , Coluzzi M , della Torre A , Roth CW , Louis C , Kalush F , Mural RJ , Myers EW , Adams MD , Smith HO , Broder S , Gardner MJ , Fraser CM , Birney E , Bork P , Brey PT , Venter JC , Weissenbach J , Kafatos FC , Collins FH , Hoffman SL
Ref : Science , 298 :129 , 2002
Abstract : Anopheles gambiae is the principal vector of malaria, a disease that afflicts more than 500 million people and causes more than 1 million deaths each year. Tenfold shotgun sequence coverage was obtained from the PEST strain of A. gambiae and assembled into scaffolds that span 278 million base pairs. A total of 91% of the genome was organized in 303 scaffolds; the largest scaffold was 23.1 million base pairs. There was substantial genetic variation within this strain, and the apparent existence of two haplotypes of approximately equal frequency ("dual haplotypes") in a substantial fraction of the genome likely reflects the outbred nature of the PEST strain. The sequence produced a conservative inference of more than 400,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that showed a markedly bimodal density distribution. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed strong evidence for about 14,000 protein-encoding transcripts. Prominent expansions in specific families of proteins likely involved in cell adhesion and immunity were noted. An expressed sequence tag analysis of genes regulated by blood feeding provided insights into the physiological adaptations of a hematophagous insect.
ESTHER : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedSearch : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedID: 12364791
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-a0nb77 , anoga-a0nbp6 , anoga-a0neb7 , anoga-a0nei9 , anoga-a0nej0 , anoga-a0ngj1 , anoga-a7ut12 , anoga-a7uuz9 , anoga-ACHE1 , anoga-ACHE2 , anoga-agCG44620 , anoga-agCG44666 , anoga-agCG45273 , anoga-agCG45279 , anoga-agCG45511 , anoga-agCG46741 , anoga-agCG47651 , anoga-agCG47655 , anoga-agCG47661 , anoga-agCG47690 , anoga-agCG48797 , anoga-AGCG49362 , anoga-agCG49462 , anoga-agCG49870 , anoga-agCG49872 , anoga-agCG49876 , anoga-agCG50851 , anoga-agCG51879 , anoga-agCG52383 , anoga-agCG54954 , anoga-AGCG55021 , anoga-agCG55401 , anoga-agCG55408 , anoga-agCG56978 , anoga-ebiG239 , anoga-ebiG2660 , anoga-ebiG5718 , anoga-ebiG5974 , anoga-ebiG8504 , anoga-ebiG8742 , anoga-glita , anoga-nrtac , anoga-q5tpv0 , anoga-Q5TVS6 , anoga-q7pm39 , anoga-q7ppw9 , anoga-q7pq17 , anoga-Q7PQT0 , anoga-q7q8m4 , anoga-q7q626 , anoga-q7qa14 , anoga-q7qa52 , anoga-q7qal7 , anoga-q7qbj0 , anoga-f5hl20 , anoga-q7qkh2 , anoga-a0a1s4h1y7 , anoga-q7q887

Title : The complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic, sulphate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus - Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
Author(s) : Klenk HP , Clayton RA , Tomb JF , White O , Nelson KE , Ketchum KA , Dodson RJ , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Richardson DL , Kerlavage AR , Graham DE , Kyrpides NC , Fleischmann RD , Quackenbush J , Lee NH , Sutton GG , Gill S , Kirkness EF , Dougherty BA , McKenney K , Adams MD , Loftus B , Peterson S , Reich CI , McNeil LK , Badger JH , Glodek A , Zhou L , Overbeek R , Gocayne JD , Weidman JF , McDonald L , Utterback T , Cotton MD , Spriggs T , Artiach P , Kaine BP , Sykes SM , Sadow PW , D'Andrea KP , Bowman C , Fujii C , Garland SA , Mason TM , Olsen GJ , Fraser CM , Smith HO , Woese CR , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 390 :364 , 1997
Abstract : Archaeoglobus fulgidus is the first sulphur-metabolizing organism to have its genome sequence determined. Its genome of 2,178,400 base pairs contains 2,436 open reading frames (ORFs). The information processing systems and the biosynthetic pathways for essential components (nucleotides, amino acids and cofactors) have extensive correlation with their counterparts in the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. The genomes of these two Archaea indicate dramatic differences in the way these organisms sense their environment, perform regulatory and transport functions, and gain energy. In contrast to M. jannaschii, A. fulgidus has fewer restriction-modification systems, and none of its genes appears to contain inteins. A quarter (651 ORFs) of the A. fulgidus genome encodes functionally uncharacterized yet conserved proteins, two-thirds of which are shared with M. jannaschii (428 ORFs). Another quarter of the genome encodes new proteins indicating substantial archaeal gene diversity.
ESTHER : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedSearch : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedID: 9389475
Gene_locus related to this paper: arcfu-AF0514 , arcfu-AF0675 , arcfu-AF1134 , arcfu-AF1563 , arcfu-AF1753 , arcfu-AF1763 , arcfu-est1 , arcfu-est2 , arcfu-est3 , arcfu-estea , arcfu-o28594 , arcfu-o29442 , arcfu-pcbd

Title : The complete genome sequence of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. - Tomb_1997_Nature_388_539
Author(s) : Tomb J-F , White O , Kerlavage AR , Clayton RA , Sutton GG , Fleischmann RD , Ketchum KA , Klenk H-P , Gill S , Dougherty BA , Nelson K , Quackenbush J , Zhou L , Kirkness EF , Peterson S , Loftus B , Richardson D , Dodson R , Khalak HG , Glodek A , McKenney K , FitzGerald LM , Lee N , Adams MD , Hickey EK , Berg DE , Gocayne JD , Utterback TR , Peterson JD , Kelley JM , Cotton MD , Weidman JM , Fujii C , Bowman C , Watthey L , Wallin E , Hayes WS , Borodovsky M , Karp PD , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 388 :539 , 1997
Abstract : Helicobacter pylori, strain 26695, has a circular genome of 1,667,867 base pairs and 1,590 predicted coding sequences. Sequence analysis indicates that H. pylori has well-developed systems for motility, for scavenging iron, and for DNA restriction and modification. Many putative adhesins, lipoproteins and other outer membrane proteins were identified, underscoring the potential complexity of host-pathogen interaction. Based on the large number of sequence-related genes encoding outer membrane proteins and the presence of homopolymeric tracts and dinucleotide repeats in coding sequences, H. pylori, like several other mucosal pathogens, probably uses recombination and slipped-strand mispairing within repeats as mechanisms for antigenic variation and adaptive evolution. Consistent with its restricted niche, H. pylori has a few regulatory networks, and a limited metabolic repertoire and biosynthetic capacity. Its survival in acid conditions depends, in part, on its ability to establish a positive inside-membrane potential in low pH.
ESTHER : Tomb_1997_Nature_388_539
PubMedSearch : Tomb_1997_Nature_388_539
PubMedID: 9252185
Gene_locus related to this paper: helpy-HP0739 , helpy-o25061