Dusterhoft A

References (10)

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of the metabolically versatile Pseudomonas putida KT2440 - Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinel C , Paulsen IT , Dodson RJ , Hilbert H , Martins dos Santos VA , Fouts DE , Gill SR , Pop M , Holmes M , Brinkac L , Beanan M , DeBoy RT , Daugherty S , Kolonay J , Madupu R , Nelson W , White O , Peterson J , Khouri H , Hance I , Chris Lee P , Holtzapple E , Scanlan D , Tran K , Moazzez A , Utterback T , Rizzo M , Lee K , Kosack D , Moestl D , Wedler H , Lauber J , Stjepandic D , Hoheisel J , Straetz M , Heim S , Kiewitz C , Eisen JA , Timmis KN , Dusterhoft A , Tummler B , Fraser CM
Ref : Environ Microbiol , 4 :799 , 2002
Abstract : Pseudomonas putida is a metabolically versatile saprophytic soil bacterium that has been certified as a biosafety host for the cloning of foreign genes. The bacterium also has considerable potential for biotechnological applications. Sequence analysis of the 6.18 Mb genome of strain KT2440 reveals diverse transport and metabolic systems. Although there is a high level of genome conservation with the pathogenic Pseudomonad Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85% of the predicted coding regions are shared), key virulence factors including exotoxin A and type III secretion systems are absent. Analysis of the genome gives insight into the non-pathogenic nature of P. putida and points to potential new applications in agriculture, biocatalysis, bioremediation and bioplastic production.
ESTHER : Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
PubMedID: 12534463
Gene_locus related to this paper: psep1-a5wa77 , psep1-a5wax1 , psepk-q88nk6 , psepk-q88qt0 , psepu-acoc , psepu-BIOH , psepu-bpest , psepu-ESTB , psepu-LIP , psepu-METX , psepu-PHAC1 , psepu-PHAC2 , psepu-PHAG , psepu-PHAZ , psepu-PIP , psepu-PP0375 , psepu-PP0498 , psepu-PP0532 , psepu-PP1064 , psepu-PP1184 , psepu-PP1310 , psepu-PP1500 , psepu-PP1617 , psepu-PP1829 , psepu-PP1979 , psepu-PP2083 , psepu-PP2201 , psepu-PP2236 , psepu-PP2567 , psepu-PP2804 , psepu-PP2934 , psepu-PP3195 , psepu-PP3367 , psepu-PP3404 , psepu-PP3645 , psepu-PP3807 , psepu-PP3812 , psepu-PP3943 , psepu-PP4164 , psepu-PP4165 , psepu-PP4178 , psepu-PP4249 , psepu-PP4540 , psepu-PP4551 , psepu-PP4583 , psepu-PP4624 , psepu-PP4634 , psepu-PP4916 , psepu-PP5117 , psepu-PP5161 , psepu-PP5167 , psepu-PPSD , psepu-Q8KQK1 , psepu-q9wwz4

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : Conservation of microstructure between a sequenced region of the genome of rice and multiple segments of the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana - Mayer_2001_Genome.Res_11_1167
Author(s) : Mayer K , Murphy G , Tarchini R , Wambutt R , Volckaert G , Pohl T , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Entian KD , Terryn N , Lemcke K , Haase D , Hall CR , van Dodeweerd AM , Tingey SV , Mewes HW , Bevan MW , Bancroft I
Ref : Genome Res , 11 :1167 , 2001
Abstract : The nucleotide sequence was determined for a 340-kb segment of rice chromosome 2, revealing 56 putative protein-coding genes. This represents a density of one gene per 6.1 kb, which is higher than was reported for a previously sequenced segment of the rice genome. Sixteen of the putative genes were supported by matches to ESTs. The predicted products of 29 of the putative genes showed similarity to known proteins, and a further 17 genes showed similarity only to predicted or hypothetical proteins identified in genome sequence data. The region contains a few transposable elements: one retrotransposon, and one transposon. The segment of the rice genome studied had previously been identified as representing a part of rice chromosome 2 that may be homologous to a segment of Arabidopsis chromosome 4. We confirmed the conservation of gene content and order between the two genome segments. In addition, we identified a further four segments of the Arabidopsis genome that contain conserved gene content and order. In total, 22 of the 56 genes identified in the rice genome segment were represented in this set of Arabidopsis genome segments, with at least five genes present, in conserved order, in each segment. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Arabidopsis genome has undergone multiple duplication events. Our results demonstrate that conservation of the genome microstructure can be identified even between monocot and dicot species. However, the frequent occurrence of duplication, and subsequent microstructure divergence, within plant genomes may necessitate the integration of subsets of genes present in multiple redundant segments to deduce evolutionary relationships and identify orthologous genes.
ESTHER : Mayer_2001_Genome.Res_11_1167
PubMedSearch : Mayer_2001_Genome.Res_11_1167
PubMedID: 11435398
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q949C9 , orysa-Q6H8G1

Title : Toward a catalog of human genes and proteins: sequencing and analysis of 500 novel complete protein coding human cDNAs - Wiemann_2001_Genome.Res_11_422
Author(s) : Wiemann S , Weil B , Wellenreuther R , Gassenhuber J , Glassl S , Ansorge W , Boecher M , Bloecker H , Bauersachs S , Blum H , Lauber J , Duesterhoeft A , Beyer A , Koehrer K , Strack N , Mewes H-W , Ottenwaelder B , Obermaier B , Tampe J , Heubner D , Wambutt R , Korn B , Klein M , Poustka A , Bocher M , Blocker H , Dusterhoft A , Kohrer K , Mewes HW , Ottenwalder B
Ref : Genome Res , 11 :422 , 2001
Abstract : With the complete human genomic sequence being unraveled, the focus will shift to gene identification and to the functional analysis of gene products. The generation of a set of cDNAs, both sequences and physical clones, which contains the complete and noninterrupted protein coding regions of all human genes will provide the indispensable tools for the systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein function to eventually understand the molecular basis of man. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of 500 novel human cDNAs containing the complete protein coding frame. Assignment to functional categories was possible for 52% (259) of the encoded proteins, the remaining fraction having no similarities with known proteins. By aligning the cDNA sequences with the sequences of the finished chromosomes 21 and 22 we identified a number of genes that either had been completely missed in the analysis of the genomic sequences or had been wrongly predicted. Three of these genes appear to be present in several copies. We conclude that full-length cDNA sequencing continues to be crucial also for the accurate identification of genes. The set of 500 novel cDNAs, and another 1000 full-coding cDNAs of known transcripts we have identified, adds up to cDNA representations covering 2%--5 % of all human genes. We thus substantially contribute to the generation of a gene catalog, consisting of both full-coding cDNA sequences and clones, which should be made freely available and will become an invaluable tool for detailed functional studies.
ESTHER : Wiemann_2001_Genome.Res_11_422
PubMedSearch : Wiemann_2001_Genome.Res_11_422
PubMedID: 11230166
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-FAM135A , human-KANSL3 , human-NDRG2 , human-NDRG4

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 5 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Tabata_2000_Nature_408_823
Author(s) : Tabata S , Kaneko T , Nakamura Y , Kotani H , Kato T , Asamizu E , Miyajima N , Sasamoto S , Kimura T , Hosouchi T , Kawashima K , Kohara M , Matsumoto M , Matsuno A , Muraki A , Nakayama S , Nakazaki N , Naruo K , Okumura S , Shinpo S , Takeuchi C , Wada T , Watanabe A , Yamada M , Yasuda M , Sato S , de la Bastide M , Huang E , Spiegel L , Gnoj L , O'Shaughnessy A , Preston R , Habermann K , Murray J , Johnson D , Rohlfing T , Nelson J , Stoneking T , Pepin K , Spieth J , Sekhon M , Armstrong J , Becker M , Belter E , Cordum H , Cordes M , Courtney L , Courtney W , Dante M , Du H , Edwards J , Fryman J , Haakensen B , Lamar E , Latreille P , Leonard S , Meyer R , Mulvaney E , Ozersky P , Riley A , Strowmatt C , Wagner-McPherson C , Wollam A , Yoakum M , Bell M , Dedhia N , Parnell L , Shah R , Rodriguez M , See LH , Vil D , Baker J , Kirchoff K , Toth K , King L , Bahret A , Miller B , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR , Wilson RK , Murphy G , Bancroft I , Volckaert G , Wambutt R , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Pohl T , Entian KD , Terryn N , Hartley N , Bent E , Johnson S , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Zimmermann W , Ramsperger U , Wedler H , Balke K , Wedler E , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirkse W , Mooijman P , Lankhorst RK , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Rose M , Hauf J , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Villarroel R , Gielen J , Ardiles W , Bents O , Lemcke K , Kolesov G , Mayer K , Rudd S , Schoof H , Schueller C , Zaccaria P , Mewes HW , Bevan M , Fransz P
Ref : Nature , 408 :823 , 2000
Abstract : The genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been sequenced by an international collaboration, The Arabidopsis Genome Initiative. Here we report the complete sequence of chromosome 5. This chromosome is 26 megabases long; it is the second largest Arabidopsis chromosome and represents 21% of the sequenced regions of the genome. The sequence of chromosomes 2 and 4 have been reported previously and that of chromosomes 1 and 3, together with an analysis of the complete genome sequence, are reported in this issue. Analysis of the sequence of chromosome 5 yields further insights into centromere structure and the sequence determinants of heterochromatin condensation. The 5,874 genes encoded on chromosome 5 reveal several new functions in plants, and the patterns of gene organization provide insights into the mechanisms and extent of genome evolution in plants.
ESTHER : Tabata_2000_Nature_408_823
PubMedSearch : Tabata_2000_Nature_408_823
PubMedID: 11130714
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At5g11650 , arath-At5g16120 , arath-at5g18630 , arath-AT5G20520 , arath-At5g21950 , arath-AT5G27320 , arath-CXE15 , arath-F1N13.220 , arath-F14F8.240 , arath-q3e9e4 , arath-q8lae9 , arath-Q8LFB7 , arath-q9ffg7 , arath-q9fij5 , arath-Q9LVU7 , arath-q66gm8 , arath-SCPL34 , arath-B9DFR3 , arath-a0a1p8bcz0

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 4 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
Author(s) : Mayer K , Schuller C , Wambutt R , Murphy G , Volckaert G , Pohl T , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Entian KD , Terryn N , Harris B , Ansorge W , Brandt P , Grivell L , Rieger M , Weichselgartner M , de Simone V , Obermaier B , Mache R , Muller M , Kreis M , Delseny M , Puigdomenech P , Watson M , Schmidtheini T , Reichert B , Portatelle D , Perez-Alonso M , Boutry M , Bancroft I , Vos P , Hoheisel J , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Ridley P , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Bilham L , Robben J , Van der Schueren J , Grymonprez B , Chuang YJ , Vandenbussche F , Braeken M , Weltjens I , Voet M , Bastiaens I , Aert R , Defoor E , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Ramsperger U , Hilbert H , Braun M , Holzer E , Brandt A , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirske W , Mooijman P , Klein Lankhorst R , Rose M , Hauf J , Kotter P , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Van den Daele H , De Keyser A , Buysshaert C , Gielen J , Villarroel R , De Clercq R , van Montagu M , Rogers J , Cronin A , Quail M , Bray-Allen S , Clark L , Doggett J , Hall S , Kay M , Lennard N , McLay K , Mayes R , Pettett A , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Benes V , Rechmann S , Borkova D , Blocker H , Scharfe M , Grimm M , Lohnert TH , Dose S , de Haan M , Maarse A , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Fartmann B , Granderath K , Dauner D , Herzl A , Neumann S , Argiriou A , Vitale D , Liguori R , Piravandi E , Massenet O , Quigley F , Clabauld G , Mundlein A , Felber R , Schnabl S , Hiller R , Schmidt W , Lecharny A , Aubourg S , Chefdor F , Cooke R , Berger C , Montfort A , Casacuberta E , Gibbons T , Weber N , Vandenbol M , Bargues M , Terol J , Torres A , Perez-Perez A , Purnelle B , Bent E , Johnson S , Tacon D , Jesse T , Heijnen L , Schwarz S , Scholler P , Heber S , Francs P , Bielke C , Frishman D , Haase D , Lemcke K , Mewes HW , Stocker S , Zaccaria P , Bevan M , Wilson RK , de la Bastide M , Habermann K , Parnell L , Dedhia N , Gnoj L , Schutz K , Huang E , Spiegel L , Sehkon M , Murray J , Sheet P , Cordes M , Abu-Threideh J , Stoneking T , Kalicki J , Graves T , Harmon G , Edwards J , Latreille P , Courtney L , Cloud J , Abbott A , Scott K , Johnson D , Minx P , Bentley D , Fulton B , Miller N , Greco T , Kemp K , Kramer J , Fulton L , Mardis E , Dante M , Pepin K , Hillier L , Nelson J , Spieth J , Ryan E , Andrews S , Geisel C , Layman D , Du H , Ali J , Berghoff A , Jones K , Drone K , Cotton M , Joshu C , Antonoiu B , Zidanic M , Strong C , Sun H , Lamar B , Yordan C , Ma P , Zhong J , Preston R , Vil D , Shekher M , Matero A , Shah R , Swaby IK , O'Shaughnessy A , Rodriguez M , Hoffmann J , Till S , Granat S , Shohdy N , Hasegawa A , Hameed A , Lodhi M , Johnson A , Chen E , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR
Ref : Nature , 402 :769 , 1999
Abstract : The higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is an important model for identifying plant genes and determining their function. To assist biological investigations and to define chromosome structure, a coordinated effort to sequence the Arabidopsis genome was initiated in late 1996. Here we report one of the first milestones of this project, the sequence of chromosome 4. Analysis of 17.38 megabases of unique sequence, representing about 17% of the genome, reveals 3,744 protein coding genes, 81 transfer RNAs and numerous repeat elements. Heterochromatic regions surrounding the putative centromere, which has not yet been completely sequenced, are characterized by an increased frequency of a variety of repeats, new repeats, reduced recombination, lowered gene density and lowered gene expression. Roughly 60% of the predicted protein-coding genes have been functionally characterized on the basis of their homology to known genes. Many genes encode predicted proteins that are homologous to human and Caenorhabditis elegans proteins.
ESTHER : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedSearch : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedID: 10617198
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT4G00500 , arath-AT4G16690 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-AT4g30610 , arath-o65513 , arath-o65713 , arath-LPAAT , arath-f4jt64

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XIV and its evolutionary implications - Philippsen_1997_Nature_387_93
Author(s) : Philippsen P , Kleine K , Pohlmann R , Dusterhoft A , Hamberg K , Hegemann JH , Obermaier B , Urrestarazu LA , Aert R , Albermann K , Altmann R , Andre B , Baladron V , Ballesta JP , Becam AM , Beinhauer J , Boskovic J , Buitrago MJ , Bussereau F , Coster F , Crouzet M , D'Angelo M , Dal Pero F , De Antoni A , del Rey F , Doignon F , Domdey H , Dubois E , Fiedler T , Fleig U , Floeth M , Fritz C , Gaillardin C , Garcia-Cantalejo JM , Glansdorff NN , Goffeau A , Gueldener U , Herbert C , Heumann K , Heuss-Neitzel D , Hilbert H , Hinni K , Iraqui Houssaini I , Jacquet M , Jimenez A , Jonniaux JL , Karpfinger L , Lanfranchi G , Lepingle A , Levesque H , Lyck R , Maftahi M , Mallet L , Maurer KC , Messenguy F , Mewes HW , Mosti D , Nasr F , Nicaud JM , Niedenthal RK , Pandolfo D , Pierard A , Piravandi E , Planta RJ , Pohl TM , Purnelle B , Rebischung C , Remacha M , Revuelta JL , Rinke M , Saiz JE , Sartorello F , Scherens B , Sen-Gupta M , Soler-Mira A , Urbanus JH , Valle G , van Dyck L , Verhasselt P , Vierendeels F , Vissers S , Voet M , Volckaert G , Wach A , Wambutt R , Wedler H , Zollner A , Hani J
Ref : Nature , 387 :93 , 1997
Abstract : In 1992 we started assembling an ordered library of cosmid clones from chromosome XIV of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At that time, only 49 genes were known to be located on this chromosome and we estimated that 80% to 90% of its genes were yet to be discovered. In 1993, a team of 20 European laboratories began the systematic sequence analysis of chromosome XIV. The completed and intensively checked final sequence of 784,328 base pairs was released in April, 1996. Substantial parts had been published before or had previously been made available on request. The sequence contained 419 known or presumptive protein-coding genes, including two pseudogenes and three retrotransposons, 14 tRNA genes, and three small nuclear RNA genes. For 116 (30%) protein-coding sequences, one or more structural homologues were identified elsewhere in the yeast genome. Half of them belong to duplicated groups of 6-14 loosely linked genes, in most cases with conserved gene order and orientation (relaxed interchromosomal synteny). We have considered the possible evolutionary origins of this unexpected feature of yeast genome organization.
ESTHER : Philippsen_1997_Nature_387_93
PubMedSearch : Philippsen_1997_Nature_387_93
PubMedID: 9169873
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-SCYNR064C , yeast-hda1

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XII - Johnston_1997_Nature_387_87
Author(s) : Johnston M , Hillier L , Riles L , Albermann K , Andre B , Ansorge W , Benes V , Bruckner M , Delius H , Dubois E , Dusterhoft A , Entian KD , Floeth M , Goffeau A , Hebling U , Heumann K , Heuss-Neitzel D , Hilbert H , Hilger F , Kleine K , Kotter P , Louis EJ , Messenguy F , Mewes HW , Miosga T , Mostl D , Muller-Auer S , Nentwich U , Obermaier B , Piravandi E , Pohl TM , Portetelle D , Purnelle B , Rechmann S , Rieger M , Rinke M , Rose M , Scharfe M , Scherens B , Scholler P , Schwager C , Schwarz S , Underwood AP , Urrestarazu LA , Vandenbol M , Verhasselt P , Vierendeels F , Voet M , Volckaert G , Voss H , Wambutt , Wedler E , Wedler H , Zimmermann FK , Zollner A , Hani J , Hoheisel JD
Ref : Nature , 387 :87 , 1997
Abstract : The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the pre-eminent organism for the study of basic functions of eukaryotic cells. All of the genes of this simple eukaryotic cell have recently been revealed by an international collaborative effort to determine the complete DNA sequence of its nuclear genome. Here we describe some of the features of chromosome XII.
ESTHER : Johnston_1997_Nature_387_87
PubMedSearch : Johnston_1997_Nature_387_87
PubMedID: 9169871
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-ict1 , yeast-YLR118c

Title : The complete genome sequence of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis - Kunst_1997_Nature_390_249
Author(s) : Kunst F , Ogasawara N , Moszer I , Albertini AM , Alloni G , Azevedo V , Bertero MG , Bessieres P , Bolotin A , Borchert S , Borriss R , Boursier L , Brans A , Braun M , Brignell SC , Bron S , Brouillet S , Bruschi CV , Caldwell B , Capuano V , Carter NM , Choi SK , Cordani JJ , Connerton IF , Cummings NJ , Daniel RA , Denziot F , Devine KM , Dusterhoft A , Ehrlich SD , Emmerson PT , Entian KD , Errington J , Fabret C , Ferrari E , Foulger D , Fritz C , Fujita M , Fujita Y , Fuma S , Galizzi A , Galleron N , Ghim SY , Glaser P , Goffeau A , Golightly EJ , Grandi G , Guiseppi G , Guy BJ , Haga K , Haiech J , Harwood CR , Henaut A , Hilbert H , Holsappel S , Hosono S , Hullo MF , Itaya M , Jones L , Joris B , Karamata D , Kasahara Y , Klaerr-Blanchard M , Klein C , Kobayashi Y , Koetter P , Koningstein G , Krogh S , Kumano M , Kurita K , Lapidus A , Lardinois S , Lauber J , Lazarevic V , Lee SM , Levine A , Liu H , Masuda S , Mauel C , Medigue C , Medina N , Mellado RP , Mizuno M , Moestl D , Nakai S , Noback M , Noone D , O'Reilly M , Ogawa K , Ogiwara A , Oudega B , Park SH , Parro V , Pohl TM , Portelle D , Porwollik S , Prescott AM , Presecan E , Pujic P , Purnelle B , Rapoport G , Rey M , Reynolds S , Rieger M , Rivolta C , Rocha E , Roche B , Rose M , Sadaie Y , Sato T , Scanlan E , Schleich S , Schroeter R , Scoffone F , Sekiguchi J , Sekowska A , Seror SJ , Serror P , Shin BS , Soldo B , Sorokin A , Tacconi E , Takagi T , Takahashi H , Takemaru K , Takeuchi M , Tamakoshi A , Tanaka T , Terpstra P , Togoni A , Tosato V , Uchiyama S , Vandebol M , Vannier F , Vassarotti A , Viari A , Wambutt R , Wedler H , Weitzenegger T , Winters P , Wipat A , Yamamoto H , Yamane K , Yasumoto K , Yata K , Yoshida K , Yoshikawa HF , Zumstein E , Yoshikawa H , Danchin A
Ref : Nature , 390 :249 , 1997
Abstract : Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large proportion of the genetic capacity is devoted to the utilization of a variety of carbon sources, including many plant-derived molecules. The identification of five signal peptidase genes, as well as several genes for components of the secretion apparatus, is important given the capacity of Bacillus strains to secrete large amounts of industrially important enzymes. Many of the genes are involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, that are more typically associated with Streptomyces species. The genome contains at least ten prophages or remnants of prophages, indicating that bacteriophage infection has played an important evolutionary role in horizontal gene transfer, in particular in the propagation of bacterial pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Kunst_1997_Nature_390_249
PubMedSearch : Kunst_1997_Nature_390_249
PubMedID: 9384377
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacsu-CAH , bacsu-cbxnp , bacsu-lip , bacsu-LIPB , bacsu-PKSR , bacsu-pnbae , bacsu-PPSE , bacsu-srf4 , bacsu-srfac , bacsu-YBAC , bacsu-YBDG , bacsu-ybfk , bacsu-ycgS , bacsu-yczh , bacsu-YDEN , bacsu-ydjp , bacsu-yfhM , bacsu-yisY , bacsu-YITV , bacsu-yjau , bacsu-YJCH , bacsu-MHQD , bacsu-yqjl , bacsu-yqkd , bacsu-YRAK , bacsu-YTAP , bacsu-YTMA , bacsu-YTPA , bacsu-ytxm , bacsu-yugF , bacsu-YUII , bacsu-YUKL , bacsu-YVAK , bacsu-YvaM , bacsu-RsbQ

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XVI - Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
Author(s) : Bussey H , Storms RK , Ahmed A , Albermann K , Allen E , Ansorge W , Araujo R , Aparicio A , Barrell B , Badcock K , Benes V , Botstein D , Bowman S , Bruckner M , Carpenter J , Cherry JM , Chung E , Churcher C , Coster F , Davis K , Davis RW , Dietrich FS , Delius H , DiPaolo T , Dubois E , Dusterhoft A , Duncan M , Floeth M , Fortin N , Friesen JD , Fritz C , Goffeau A , Hall J , Hebling U , Heumann K , Hilbert H , Hillier L , Hunicke-Smith S , Hyman R , Johnston M , Kalman S , Kleine K , Komp C , Kurdi O , Lashkari D , Lew H , Lin A , Lin D , Louis EJ , Marathe R , Messenguy F , Mewes HW , Mirtipati S , Moestl D , Muller-Auer S , Namath A , Nentwich U , Oefner P , Pearson D , Petel FX , Pohl TM , Purnelle B , Rajandream MA , Rechmann S , Rieger M , Riles L , Roberts D , Schafer M , Scharfe M , Scherens B , Schramm S , Schroder M , Sdicu AM , Tettelin H , Urrestarazu LA , Ushinsky S , Vierendeels F , Vissers S , Voss H , Walsh SV , Wambutt R , Wang Y , Wedler E , Wedler H , Winnett E , Zhong WW , Zollner A , Vo DH , Hani J
Ref : Nature , 387 :103 , 1997
Abstract : The nucleotide sequence of the 948,061 base pairs of chromosome XVI has been determined, completing the sequence of the yeast genome. Chromosome XVI was the last yeast chromosome identified, and some of the genes mapped early to it, such as GAL4, PEP4 and RAD1 (ref. 2) have played important roles in the development of yeast biology. The architecture of this final chromosome seems to be typical of the large yeast chromosomes, and shows large duplications with other yeast chromosomes. Chromosome XVI contains 487 potential protein-encoding genes, 17 tRNA genes and two small nuclear RNA genes; 27% of the genes have significant similarities to human gene products, and 48% are new and of unknown biological function. Systematic efforts to explore gene function have begun.
ESTHER : Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
PubMedSearch : Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
PubMedID: 9169875
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-MCFS1 , yeast-YPR147C