Hamlin N

References (15)

Title : Complete genome of acute rheumatic fever-associated serotype M5 Streptococcus pyogenes strain manfredo - Holden_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_1473
Author(s) : Holden MT , Scott A , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Cronin A , Dowd L , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Moule S , Mungall K , Quail MA , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Sharp S , Skelton J , Whitehead S , Barrell BG , Kehoe M , Parkhill J
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 189 :1473 , 2007
Abstract : Comparisons of the 1.84-Mb genome of serotype M5 Streptococcus pyogenes strain Manfredo with previously sequenced genomes emphasized the role of prophages in diversification of S. pyogenes and the close relationship between strain Manfredo and MGAS8232, another acute rheumatic fever-associated strain.
ESTHER : Holden_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_1473
PubMedSearch : Holden_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_1473
PubMedID: 17012393
Gene_locus related to this paper: strpy-ESTA , strpy-PEPXP , strpy-SPY1308 , strpy-SPYM18.1727

Title : The genome of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum - Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
Author(s) : Eichinger L , Pachebat JA , Glockner G , Rajandream MA , Sucgang R , Berriman M , Song J , Olsen R , Szafranski K , Xu Q , Tunggal B , Kummerfeld S , Madera M , Konfortov BA , Rivero F , Bankier AT , Lehmann R , Hamlin N , Davies R , Gaudet P , Fey P , Pilcher K , Chen G , Saunders D , Sodergren E , Davis P , Kerhornou A , Nie X , Hall N , Anjard C , Hemphill L , Bason N , Farbrother P , Desany B , Just E , Morio T , Rost R , Churcher C , Cooper J , Haydock S , van Driessche N , Cronin A , Goodhead I , Muzny D , Mourier T , Pain A , Lu M , Harper D , Lindsay R , Hauser H , James K , Quiles M , Madan Babu M , Saito T , Buchrieser C , Wardroper A , Felder M , Thangavelu M , Johnson D , Knights A , Loulseged H , Mungall K , Oliver K , Price C , Quail MA , Urushihara H , Hernandez J , Rabbinowitsch E , Steffen D , Sanders M , Ma J , Kohara Y , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Spiegler S , Tivey A , Sugano S , White B , Walker D , Woodward J , Winckler T , Tanaka Y , Shaulsky G , Schleicher M , Weinstock G , Rosenthal A , Cox EC , Chisholm RL , Gibbs R , Loomis WF , Platzer M , Kay RR , Williams J , Dear PH , Noegel AA , Barrell B , Kuspa A
Ref : Nature , 435 :43 , 2005
Abstract : The social amoebae are exceptional in their ability to alternate between unicellular and multicellular forms. Here we describe the genome of the best-studied member of this group, Dictyostelium discoideum. The gene-dense chromosomes of this organism encode approximately 12,500 predicted proteins, a high proportion of which have long, repetitive amino acid tracts. There are many genes for polyketide synthases and ABC transporters, suggesting an extensive secondary metabolism for producing and exporting small molecules. The genome is rich in complex repeats, one class of which is clustered and may serve as centromeres. Partial copies of the extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) element are found at the ends of each chromosome, suggesting a novel telomere structure and the use of a common mechanism to maintain both the rDNA and chromosomal termini. A proteome-based phylogeny shows that the amoebozoa diverged from the animal-fungal lineage after the plant-animal split, but Dictyostelium seems to have retained more of the diversity of the ancestral genome than have plants, animals or fungi.
ESTHER : Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
PubMedSearch : Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
PubMedID: 15875012
Gene_locus related to this paper: dicdi-abhd , dicdi-ACHE , dicdi-apra , dicdi-cinbp , dicdi-CMBL , dicdi-crysp , dicdi-DPOA , dicdi-P90528 , dicdi-ppme1 , dicdi-Q8MYE7 , dicdi-q54cf7 , dicdi-q54cl7 , dicdi-q54cm0 , dicdi-q54ct5 , dicdi-q54cu1 , dicdi-q54d54 , dicdi-q54d66 , dicdi-q54dj5 , dicdi-q54dy7 , dicdi-q54ek1 , dicdi-q54eq6 , dicdi-q54et1 , dicdi-q54et7 , dicdi-q54f01 , dicdi-q54g24 , dicdi-q54g47 , dicdi-q54gi7 , dicdi-q54gw5 , dicdi-q54gx3 , dicdi-q54h23 , dicdi-q54h73 , dicdi-q54i38 , dicdi-q54ie5 , dicdi-q54in4 , dicdi-q54kz1 , dicdi-q54l36 , dicdi-q54li1 , dicdi-q54m29 , dicdi-q54n21 , dicdi-q54n35 , dicdi-q54n85 , dicdi-q54qe7 , dicdi-q54qi3 , dicdi-q54qk2 , dicdi-q54rl3 , dicdi-q54rl8 , dicdi-q54sy6 , dicdi-q54sz3 , dicdi-q54t49 , dicdi-q54t91 , dicdi-q54th2 , dicdi-q54u01 , dicdi-q54vc2 , dicdi-q54vw1 , dicdi-q54xe3 , dicdi-q54xl3 , dicdi-q54xu1 , dicdi-q54xu2 , dicdi-q54y48 , dicdi-q54yd0 , dicdi-q54ye0 , dicdi-q54yl1 , dicdi-q54yr8 , dicdi-q54z90 , dicdi-q55bx3 , dicdi-q55d01 , dicdi-q55d81 , dicdi-q55du6 , dicdi-q55eu1 , dicdi-q55eu8 , dicdi-q55fk4 , dicdi-q55gk7 , dicdi-Q54ZA6 , dicdi-q86h82 , dicdi-Q86HC9 , dicdi-Q86HM5 , dicdi-Q86HM6 , dicdi-q86iz7 , dicdi-q86jb6 , dicdi-Q86KU7 , dicdi-q550s3 , dicdi-q552c0 , dicdi-q553t5 , dicdi-q555e5 , dicdi-q555h0 , dicdi-q555h1 , dicdi-q557k5 , dicdi-q558u2 , dicdi-Q869Q8 , dicdi-u554 , dicdi-y9086 , dicdi-q54r44 , dicdi-f172a

Title : Complete genome sequence and lytic phase transcription profile of a Coccolithovirus - Wilson_2005_Science_309_1090
Author(s) : Wilson WH , Schroeder DC , Allen MJ , Holden MT , Parkhill J , Barrell BG , Churcher C , Hamlin N , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Quail MA , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Walker D , Craigon M , Roy D , Ghazal P
Ref : Science , 309 :1090 , 2005
Abstract : The genus Coccolithovirus is a recently discovered group of viruses that infect the globally important marine calcifying microalga Emiliania huxleyi. Among the 472 predicted genes of the 407,339-base pair genome are a variety of unexpected genes, most notably those involved in biosynthesis of ceramide, a sphingolipid known to induce apoptosis. Uniquely for algal viruses, it also contains six RNA polymerase subunits and a novel promoter, suggesting this virus encodes its own transcription machinery. Microarray transcriptomic analysis reveals that 65% of the predicted virus-encoded genes are expressed during lytic infection of E. huxleyi.
ESTHER : Wilson_2005_Science_309_1090
PubMedSearch : Wilson_2005_Science_309_1090
PubMedID: 16099989
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9phyc-q4a2b6 , 9phyc-q4a3c9 , ehv86-q4a332

Title : The complete genome sequence and analysis of Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC13129 - Cerdeno-Tarraga_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_6516
Author(s) : Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Efstratiou A , Dover LG , Holden MT , Pallen M , Bentley SD , Besra GS , Churcher C , James KD , De Zoysa A , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Dowd L , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Moule S , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford KM , Thomson NR , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Barrell BG , Parkhill J
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 31 :6516 , 2003
Abstract : Corynebacterium diphtheriae is a Gram-positive, non-spore forming, non-motile, pleomorphic rod belonging to the genus Corynebacterium and the actinomycete group of organisms. The organism produces a potent bacteriophage-encoded protein exotoxin, diphtheria toxin (DT), which causes the symptoms of diphtheria. This potentially fatal infectious disease is controlled in many developed countries by an effective immunisation programme. However, the disease has made a dramatic return in recent years, in particular within the Eastern European region. The largest, and still on-going, outbreak since the advent of mass immunisation started within Russia and the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union in the 1990s. We have sequenced the genome of a UK clinical isolate (biotype gravis strain NCTC13129), representative of the clone responsible for this outbreak. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 2 488 635 bp, with no plasmids. It provides evidence that recent acquisition of pathogenicity factors goes beyond the toxin itself, and includes iron-uptake systems, adhesins and fimbrial proteins. This is in contrast to Corynebacterium's nearest sequenced pathogenic relative, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where there is little evidence of recent horizontal DNA acquisition. The genome itself shows an unusually extreme large-scale compositional bias, being noticeably higher in G+C near the origin than at the terminus.
ESTHER : Cerdeno-Tarraga_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_6516
PubMedSearch : Cerdeno-Tarraga_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_6516
PubMedID: 14602910
Gene_locus related to this paper: cordi-DIP1007 , cordi-DIP1729 , cordi-q6ned6 , cordi-q6nes3 , cordi-q6nes4 , cordi-q6nes6 , cordi-q6nes8 , cordi-q6nev5 , cordi-q6nex0 , cordi-q6nez6 , cordi-q6nf79 , cordi-q6nfa8 , cordi-q6nfg5 , cordi-q6nfz1 , cordi-q6ng42 , cordi-q6ngl8 , cordi-q6nhd8 , cordi-q6niz3 , cordi-q6nj46 , cordi-q6njn3 , cordi-q6njn4 , cordi-q6njt5 , cordi-q6nkb6 , cordk-h2hkn5

Title : Comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica - Parkhill_2003_Nat.Genet_35_32
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Sebaihia M , Preston A , Murphy LD , Thomson N , Harris DE , Holden MT , Churcher CM , Bentley SD , Mungall KL , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Temple L , James K , Harris B , Quail MA , Achtman M , Atkin R , Baker S , Basham D , Bason N , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Collins M , Cronin A , Davis P , Doggett J , Feltwell T , Goble A , Hamlin N , Hauser H , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Leather S , Moule S , Norberczak H , O'Neil S , Ormond D , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutter S , Sanders M , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Barrell BG , Maskell DJ
Ref : Nat Genet , 35 :32 , 2003
Abstract : Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica are closely related Gram-negative beta-proteobacteria that colonize the respiratory tracts of mammals. B. pertussis is a strict human pathogen of recent evolutionary origin and is the primary etiologic agent of whooping cough. B. parapertussis can also cause whooping cough, and B. bronchiseptica causes chronic respiratory infections in a wide range of animals. We sequenced the genomes of B. bronchiseptica RB50 (5,338,400 bp; 5,007 predicted genes), B. parapertussis 12822 (4,773,551 bp; 4,404 genes) and B. pertussis Tohama I (4,086,186 bp; 3,816 genes). Our analysis indicates that B. parapertussis and B. pertussis are independent derivatives of B. bronchiseptica-like ancestors. During the evolution of these two host-restricted species there was large-scale gene loss and inactivation; host adaptation seems to be a consequence of loss, not gain, of function, and differences in virulence may be related to loss of regulatory or control functions.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2003_Nat.Genet_35_32
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2003_Nat.Genet_35_32
PubMedID: 12910271
Gene_locus related to this paper: borbr-BB0273 , borbr-BB0570 , borbr-BB0670 , borbr-BB1064 , borbr-BB1079 , borbr-BB1247 , borbr-BB1498 , borbr-BB2718 , borbr-BB4129 , borbr-BB4247 , borbr-MHPC , borbr-q7wdw1 , borbr-q7wiz8 , borbr-q7wk25 , borbr-q7wmc2 , borbr-q7wpd9 , borpa-q7w3f3 , borpa-q7w9v8 , borpe-BIOH , borpe-BP0300 , borpe-BP2114 , borpe-BP2146 , borpe-BP2511 , borpe-BP3096 , borpe-BP3623 , borpe-BP3691 , borpe-CATD2 , borpe-METX , borpe-O30449 , borpe-PHBC , borpe-q7vsl4 , borpe-q7vt07 , borpe-q7vtg0 , borpe-q7vtv2 , borpe-q7vus4 , borpe-q7vuv4 , borpe-q7vv11 , borpe-q7vv48 , borpe-q7vvf6 , borpe-q7vwu4 , borpe-q7vyn0 , borpe-q7vyq4 , borpe-q7vz26 , borpe-q7vzb4 , borpe-q7vzj6 , borpe-q7w073

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 - Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
Author(s) : Hall N , Pain A , Berriman M , Churcher C , Harris B , Harris D , Mungall K , Bowman S , Atkin R , Baker S , Barron A , Brooks K , Buckee CO , Burrows C , Cherevach I , Chillingworth C , Chillingworth T , Christodoulou Z , Clark L , Clark R , Corton C , Cronin A , Davies R , Davis P , Dear P , Dearden F , Doggett J , Feltwell T , Goble A , Goodhead I , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Hance Z , Harper D , Hauser H , Hornsby T , Holroyd S , Horrocks P , Humphray S , Jagels K , James KD , Johnson D , Kerhornou A , Knights A , Konfortov B , Kyes S , Larke N , Lawson D , Lennard N , Line A , Maddison M , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Ormond D , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Rutherford KM , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Seeger K , Sharp S , Smith R , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Tivey A , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Sulston JE , Craig A , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 419 :527 , 2002
Abstract : Since the sequencing of the first two chromosomes of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there has been a concerted effort to sequence and assemble the entire genome of this organism. Here we report the sequence of chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 of P. falciparum clone 3D7--these chromosomes account for approximately 55% of the total genome. We describe the methods used to map, sequence and annotate these chromosomes. By comparing our assemblies with the optical map, we indicate the completeness of the resulting sequence. During annotation, we assign Gene Ontology terms to the predicted gene products, and observe clustering of some malaria-specific terms to specific chromosomes. We identify a highly conserved sequence element found in the intergenic region of internal var genes that is not associated with their telomeric counterparts.
ESTHER : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedSearch : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedID: 12368867
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plafa-MAL6P1.135 , plafa-PFD0185C , plafa-PFI1775W , plafa-PFI1800W

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : Complete genome sequence of a multiple drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18 - Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_848
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Dougan G , James KD , Thomson NR , Pickard D , Wain J , Churcher C , Mungall KL , Bentley SD , Holden MT , Sebaihia M , Baker S , Basham D , Brooks K , Chillingworth T , Connerton P , Cronin A , Davis P , Davies RM , Dowd L , White N , Farrar J , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Haque A , Hien TT , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Krogh A , Larsen TS , Leather S , Moule S , O'Gaora P , Parry C , Quail M , Rutherford K , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Stevens K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 413 :848 , 2001
Abstract : Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) is the aetiological agent of typhoid fever, a serious invasive bacterial disease of humans with an annual global burden of approximately 16 million cases, leading to 600,000 fatalities. Many S. enterica serovars actively invade the mucosal surface of the intestine but are normally contained in healthy individuals by the local immune defence mechanisms. However, S. typhi has evolved the ability to spread to the deeper tissues of humans, including liver, spleen and bone marrow. Here we have sequenced the 4,809,037-base pair (bp) genome of a S. typhi (CT18) that is resistant to multiple drugs, revealing the presence of hundreds of insertions and deletions compared with the Escherichia coli genome, ranging in size from single genes to large islands. Notably, the genome sequence identifies over two hundred pseudogenes, several corresponding to genes that are known to contribute to virulence in Salmonella typhimurium. This genetic degradation may contribute to the human-restricted host range for S. typhi. CT18 harbours a 218,150-bp multiple-drug-resistance incH1 plasmid (pHCM1), and a 106,516-bp cryptic plasmid (pHCM2), which shows recent common ancestry with a virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_848
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_848
PubMedID: 11677608
Gene_locus related to this paper: salen-OPDB , salti-q8z717 , salty-AES , salty-BIOH , salty-ENTF , salty-FES , salty-IROD , salty-IROE , salty-PLDB , salty-STM2547 , salty-STM4506 , salty-STY1441 , salty-STY2428 , salty-STY3846 , salty-yafa , salty-YBFF , salty-ycfp , salty-YFBB , salty-YJFP , salty-YQIA

Title : Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus - Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
Author(s) : Cole ST , Eiglmeier K , Parkhill J , James KD , Thomson NR , Wheeler PR , Honore N , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Mungall K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies RM , Devlin K , Duthoy S , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Lacroix C , Maclean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Rutter S , Seeger K , Simon S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 409 :1007 , 2001
Abstract : Leprosy, a chronic human neurological disease, results from infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae, a close relative of the tubercle bacillus. Mycobacterium leprae has the longest doubling time of all known bacteria and has thwarted every effort at culture in the laboratory. Comparing the 3.27-megabase (Mb) genome sequence of an armadillo-derived Indian isolate of the leprosy bacillus with that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.41 Mb) provides clear explanations for these properties and reveals an extreme case of reductive evolution. Less than half of the genome contains functional genes but pseudogenes, with intact counterparts in M. tuberculosis, abound. Genome downsizing and the current mosaic arrangement appear to have resulted from extensive recombination events between dispersed repetitive sequences. Gene deletion and decay have eliminated many important metabolic activities including siderophore production, part of the oxidative and most of the microaerophilic and anaerobic respiratory chains, and numerous catabolic systems and their regulatory circuits.
ESTHER : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedSearch : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedID: 11234002
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-a85a , mycle-a85b , mycle-a85c , mycle-lipG , mycle-LPQC , mycle-metx , mycle-ML0314 , mycle-ML0370 , mycle-ML0376 , mycle-ML1339 , mycle-ML1444 , mycle-ML1632 , mycle-ML1633 , mycle-ML1921 , mycle-ML2269 , mycle-ML2297 , mycle-ML2359 , mycle-ML2603 , mycle-mpt5 , mycle-PKS13 , mycle-PTRB , mycle-q9cc62 , mycle-q9cdb3

Title : Genome sequence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. - Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_523
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Wren BW , Thomson NR , Titball RW , Holden MTG , Prentice MB , Sebaihia M , James KD , Churcher C , Mungall KL , Baker S , Basham D , Bentley SD , Brooks K , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Davies RM , Davis P , Dougan G , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Karlyshev AV , Leather S , Moule S , Oyston PCF , Quail M , Rutherford K , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Stevens K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 413 :523 , 2001
Abstract : The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the systemic invasive infectious disease classically referred to as plague, and has been responsible for three human pandemics: the Justinian plague (sixth to eighth centuries), the Black Death (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries) and modern plague (nineteenth century to the present day). The recent identification of strains resistant to multiple drugs and the potential use of Y. pestis as an agent of biological warfare mean that plague still poses a threat to human health. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Y. pestis strain CO92, consisting of a 4.65-megabase (Mb) chromosome and three plasmids of 96.2 kilobases (kb), 70.3 kb and 9.6 kb. The genome is unusually rich in insertion sequences and displays anomalies in GC base-composition bias, indicating frequent intragenomic recombination. Many genes seem to have been acquired from other bacteria and viruses (including adhesins, secretion systems and insecticidal toxins). The genome contains around 150 pseudogenes, many of which are remnants of a redundant enteropathogenic lifestyle. The evidence of ongoing genome fluidity, expansion and decay suggests Y. pestis is a pathogen that has undergone large-scale genetic flux and provides a unique insight into the ways in which new and highly virulent pathogens evolve.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_523
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_523
PubMedID: 11586360
Gene_locus related to this paper: yerpe-BIOH , yerpe-dlhh , yerpe-IRP1 , yerpe-PIP , yerpe-PLDB , yerpe-PTRB , yerpe-q8zey9 , yerpe-y1616 , yerpe-y3224 , yerpe-YBTT , yerpe-YPLA , yerpe-YPO0180 , yerpe-YPO0667 , yerpe-YPO0773 , yerpe-YPO0776 , yerpe-YPO0986 , yerpe-YPO1501 , yerpe-YPO1997 , yerpe-YPO2002 , yerpe-YPO2336 , yerpe-YPO2526 , yerpe-YPO2638 , yerpe-YPO2814 , yerpe-YPO4014

Title : Complete DNA sequence of a serogroup A strain of Neisseria meningitidis Z2491 - Parkhill_2000_Nature_404_502
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Achtman M , James KD , Bentley SD , Churcher C , Klee SR , Morelli G , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Davies RM , Davis P , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Leather S , Moule S , Mungall K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Whitehead S , Spratt BG , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 404 :502 , 2000
Abstract : Neisseria meningitidis causes bacterial meningitis and is therefore responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in both the developed and the developing world. Meningococci are opportunistic pathogens that colonize the nasopharynges and oropharynges of asymptomatic carriers. For reasons that are still mostly unknown, they occasionally gain access to the blood, and subsequently to the cerebrospinal fluid, to cause septicaemia and meningitis. N. meningitidis strains are divided into a number of serogroups on the basis of the immunochemistry of their capsular polysaccharides; serogroup A strains are responsible for major epidemics and pandemics of meningococcal disease, and therefore most of the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Here we have determined the complete genome sequence of a serogroup A strain of Neisseria meningitidis, Z2491. The sequence is 2,184,406 base pairs in length, with an overall G+C content of 51.8%, and contains 2,121 predicted coding sequences. The most notable feature of the genome is the presence of many hundreds of repetitive elements, ranging from short repeats, positioned either singly or in large multiple arrays, to insertion sequences and gene duplications of one kilobase or more. Many of these repeats appear to be involved in genome fluidity and antigenic variation in this important human pathogen.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2000_Nature_404_502
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2000_Nature_404_502
PubMedID: 10761919
Gene_locus related to this paper: neima-metx , neimb-q9k0t9 , neime-ESD , neime-NMA2216 , neime-NMB0276 , neime-NMB1877 , neimf-a1kta9 , neime-r0tza2

Title : The complete nucleotide sequence of chromosome 3 of Plasmodium falciparum - Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
Author(s) : Bowman S , Lawson D , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Churcher CM , Craig A , Davies RM , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Harris D , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Horrocks P , Jagels K , Jassal B , Kyes S , McLean J , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 400 :532 , 1999
Abstract : Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 3, and comparison with chromosome 2, highlights novel features of chromosome organization and gene structure. The sub-telomeric regions of chromosome 3 show a conserved order of features, including repetitive DNA sequences, members of multigene families involved in pathogenesis and antigenic variation, a number of conserved pseudogenes, and several genes of unknown function. A putative centromere has been identified that has a core region of about 2 kilobases with an extremely high (adenine + thymidine) composition and arrays of tandem repeats. We have predicted 215 protein-coding genes and two transfer RNA genes in the 1,060,106-base-pair chromosome sequence. The predicted protein-coding genes can be divided into three main classes: 52.6% are not spliced, 45.1% have a large exon with short additional 5' or 3' exons, and 2.3% have a multiple exon structure more typical of higher eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
PubMedSearch : Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
PubMedID: 10448855
Gene_locus related to this paper: plafa-PFC0950C

Title : Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence - Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
Author(s) : Cole ST , Brosch R , Parkhill J , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Gordon SV , Eiglmeier K , Gas S , Barry CE, 3rd , Tekaia F , Badcock K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies R , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Krogh A , McLean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Osborne J , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Rutter S , Seeger K , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 393 :537 , 1998
Abstract : Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,529 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. M. tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation.
ESTHER : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedSearch : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedID: 9634230
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-cut3 , myctu-cutas1 , myctu-cutas2 , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-lipJ , myctu-LIPS , myctu-lipv , myctu-LPQC , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT1628 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-RV3473C , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV - Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
Author(s) : Jacq C , Alt-Morbe J , Andre B , Arnold W , Bahr A , Ballesta JP , Bargues M , Baron L , Becker A , Biteau N , Blocker H , Blugeon C , Boskovic J , Brandt P , Bruckner M , Buitrago MJ , Coster F , Delaveau T , del Rey F , Dujon B , Eide LG , Garcia-Cantalejo JM , Goffeau A , Gomez-Peris AC , Granotier C , Hanemann V , Hankeln T , Hoheisel JD , Jager W , Jimenez A , Jonniaux JL , Kramer C , Kuster H , Laamanen P , Legros Y , Louis E , Muller-Rieker S , Monnet A , Moro M , Muller-Auer S , Nussbaumer B , Paricio N , Paulin L , Perea J , Perez-Alonso M , Perez-Ortin JE , Pohl TM , Prydz H , Purnelle B , Rasmussen SW , Remacha M , Revuelta JL , Rieger M , Salom D , Saluz HP , Saiz JE , Saren AM , Schafer M , Scharfe M , Schmidt ER , Schneider C , Scholler P , Schwarz S , Soler-Mira A , Urrestarazu LA , Verhasselt P , Vissers S , Voet M , Volckaert G , Wagner G , Wambutt R , Wedler E , Wedler H , Wolfl S , Harris DE , Bowman S , Brown D , Churcher CM , Connor R , Dedman K , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Hunt S , Jones L , McDonald S , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , Rajandream MA , Richards C , Shore L , Walsh SV , Barrell BG , Dietrich FS , Mulligan J , Allen E , Araujo R , Aviles E , Berno A , Carpenter J , Chen E , Cherry JM , Chung E , Duncan M , Hunicke-Smith S , Hyman R , Komp C , Lashkari D , Lew H , Lin D , Mosedale D , Nakahara K , Namath A , Oefner P , Oh C , Petel FX , Roberts D , Schramm S , Schroeder M , Shogren T , Shroff N , Winant A , Yelton M , Botstein D , Davis RW , Johnston M , Hillier L , Riles L , Albermann K , Hani J , Heumann K , Kleine K , Mewes HW , Zollner A , Zaccaria P
Ref : Nature , 387 :75 , 1997
Abstract : The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV has been determined. Apart from chromosome XII, which contains the 1-2 Mb rDNA cluster, chromosome IV is the longest S. cerevisiae chromosome. It was split into three parts, which were sequenced by a consortium from the European Community, the Sanger Centre, and groups from St Louis and Stanford in the United States. The sequence of 1,531,974 base pairs contains 796 predicted or known genes, 318 (39.9%) of which have been previously identified. Of the 478 new genes, 225 (28.3%) are homologous to previously identified genes and 253 (32%) have unknown functions or correspond to spurious open reading frames (ORFs). On average there is one gene approximately every two kilobases. Superimposed on alternating regional variations in G+C composition, there is a large central domain with a lower G+C content that contains all the yeast transposon (Ty) elements and most of the tRNA genes. Chromosome IV shares with chromosomes II, V, XII, XIII and XV some long clustered duplications which partly explain its origin.
ESTHER : Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
PubMedSearch : Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
PubMedID: 9169867
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-dlhh , yeast-ECM18 , yeast-YDL109C , yeast-YDR428C , yeast-YDR444W

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XIII - Bowman_1997_Nature_387_90
Author(s) : Bowman S , Churcher C , Badcock K , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Dedman K , Devlin K , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Hunt S , Jagels K , Lye G , Moule S , Odell C , Pearson D , Rajandream M , Rice P , Skelton J , Walsh S , Whitehead S , Barrell B
Ref : Nature , 387 :90 , 1997
Abstract : Systematic sequencing of the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has revealed thousands of new predicted genes and allowed analysis of long-range features of chromosomal organization. Generally, genes and predicted genes seem to be distributed evenly throughout the genome, having no overall preference for DNA strand. Apart from the smaller chromosomes, which can have substantially lower gene density in their telomeric regions, there is a consistent average of one open reading frame (ORF) approximately every two kilobases. However, one of the most surprising findings for a eukaryote with approximately 6,000 genes was the amount of apparent redundancy in its genome. This redundancy occurs both between individual ORFs and over more extensive chromosome regions, which have been duplicated preserving gene order and orientation. Here we report the entire nucleotide sequence of chromosome XIII, the sixth-largest S. cerevisiae chromosome, and demonstrate that its features and organization are consistent with those observed for other S. cerevisiae chromosomes. Analysis revealed 459 ORFs, 284 have not been identified previously. Both intra- and interchromosomal duplications of regions of this chromosome have occurred.
ESTHER : Bowman_1997_Nature_387_90
PubMedSearch : Bowman_1997_Nature_387_90
PubMedID: 9169872
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-FSH2 , yeast-ym60 , yeast-ymc0