Hornsby T

References (6)

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 - Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
Author(s) : Hall N , Pain A , Berriman M , Churcher C , Harris B , Harris D , Mungall K , Bowman S , Atkin R , Baker S , Barron A , Brooks K , Buckee CO , Burrows C , Cherevach I , Chillingworth C , Chillingworth T , Christodoulou Z , Clark L , Clark R , Corton C , Cronin A , Davies R , Davis P , Dear P , Dearden F , Doggett J , Feltwell T , Goble A , Goodhead I , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Hance Z , Harper D , Hauser H , Hornsby T , Holroyd S , Horrocks P , Humphray S , Jagels K , James KD , Johnson D , Kerhornou A , Knights A , Konfortov B , Kyes S , Larke N , Lawson D , Lennard N , Line A , Maddison M , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Ormond D , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Rutherford KM , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Seeger K , Sharp S , Smith R , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Tivey A , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Sulston JE , Craig A , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 419 :527 , 2002
Abstract : Since the sequencing of the first two chromosomes of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there has been a concerted effort to sequence and assemble the entire genome of this organism. Here we report the sequence of chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 of P. falciparum clone 3D7--these chromosomes account for approximately 55% of the total genome. We describe the methods used to map, sequence and annotate these chromosomes. By comparing our assemblies with the optical map, we indicate the completeness of the resulting sequence. During annotation, we assign Gene Ontology terms to the predicted gene products, and observe clustering of some malaria-specific terms to specific chromosomes. We identify a highly conserved sequence element found in the intergenic region of internal var genes that is not associated with their telomeric counterparts.
ESTHER : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedSearch : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedID: 12368867
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plafa-MAL6P1.135 , plafa-PFD0185C , plafa-PFI1775W , plafa-PFI1800W

Title : Complete genome sequence of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) - Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
Author(s) : Bentley SD , Chater KF , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Challis GL , Thomson NR , James KD , Harris DE , Quail MA , Kieser H , Harper D , Bateman A , Brown S , Chandra G , Chen CW , Collins M , Cronin A , Fraser A , Goble A , Hidalgo J , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huang CH , Kieser T , Larke L , Murphy L , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Seeger K , Saunders D , Sharp S , Squares R , Squares S , Taylor K , Warren T , Wietzorrek A , Woodward J , Barrell BG , Parkhill J , Hopwood DA
Ref : Nature , 417 :141 , 2002
Abstract : Streptomyces coelicolor is a representative of the group of soil-dwelling, filamentous bacteria responsible for producing most natural antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. Here we report the 8,667,507 base pair linear chromosome of this organism, containing the largest number of genes so far discovered in a bacterium. The 7,825 predicted genes include more than 20 clusters coding for known or predicted secondary metabolites. The genome contains an unprecedented proportion of regulatory genes, predominantly those likely to be involved in responses to external stimuli and stresses, and many duplicated gene sets that may represent 'tissue-specific' isoforms operating in different phases of colonial development, a unique situation for a bacterium. An ancient synteny was revealed between the central 'core' of the chromosome and the whole chromosome of pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The genome sequence will greatly increase our understanding of microbial life in the soil as well as aiding the generation of new drug candidates by genetic engineering.
ESTHER : Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
PubMedSearch : Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
PubMedID: 12000953
Gene_locus related to this paper: strco-cxest , strco-cxest2 , strco-ester , strco-estli , strco-MMYT , strco-ORF3 , strco-q9f2m1 , strco-q9rdq9 , strco-q9x8r0 , strco-SC1A6.21 , strco-SC3F7.14 , strco-SC4C2.18 , strco-SC10F4.23 , strco-SCBAC20F6.10 , strco-SCD95A , strco-SCE8.12C , strco-SCE63.01 , strco-SCF43.16C , strco-SCJ9A.33C , strco-SCO0047 , strco-SCO0135 , strco-SCO0490 , strco-SCO0503 , strco-SCO0556.1 , strco-SCO0556.2 , strco-SCO1265 , strco-SCO2123 , strco-SCO2516 , strco-SCO2723 , strco-SCO2761 , strco-SCO3396 , strco-SCO3772 , strco-SCO4160 , strco-SCO4900 , strco-SCO5215 , strco-SCO5986 , strco-SCO6351 , strco-SCO6488 , strco-SCO7057 , strco-SCO7121 , strco-SCO7396 , strco-SCO7609 , strco-SCOT , strco-SLPD , strco-TAP

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus - Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
Author(s) : Cole ST , Eiglmeier K , Parkhill J , James KD , Thomson NR , Wheeler PR , Honore N , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Mungall K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies RM , Devlin K , Duthoy S , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Lacroix C , Maclean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Rutter S , Seeger K , Simon S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 409 :1007 , 2001
Abstract : Leprosy, a chronic human neurological disease, results from infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae, a close relative of the tubercle bacillus. Mycobacterium leprae has the longest doubling time of all known bacteria and has thwarted every effort at culture in the laboratory. Comparing the 3.27-megabase (Mb) genome sequence of an armadillo-derived Indian isolate of the leprosy bacillus with that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.41 Mb) provides clear explanations for these properties and reveals an extreme case of reductive evolution. Less than half of the genome contains functional genes but pseudogenes, with intact counterparts in M. tuberculosis, abound. Genome downsizing and the current mosaic arrangement appear to have resulted from extensive recombination events between dispersed repetitive sequences. Gene deletion and decay have eliminated many important metabolic activities including siderophore production, part of the oxidative and most of the microaerophilic and anaerobic respiratory chains, and numerous catabolic systems and their regulatory circuits.
ESTHER : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedSearch : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedID: 11234002
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-a85a , mycle-a85b , mycle-a85c , mycle-lipG , mycle-LPQC , mycle-metx , mycle-ML0314 , mycle-ML0370 , mycle-ML0376 , mycle-ML1339 , mycle-ML1444 , mycle-ML1632 , mycle-ML1633 , mycle-ML1921 , mycle-ML2269 , mycle-ML2297 , mycle-ML2359 , mycle-ML2603 , mycle-mpt5 , mycle-PKS13 , mycle-PTRB , mycle-q9cc62 , mycle-q9cdb3

Title : The complete nucleotide sequence of chromosome 3 of Plasmodium falciparum - Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
Author(s) : Bowman S , Lawson D , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Churcher CM , Craig A , Davies RM , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Harris D , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Horrocks P , Jagels K , Jassal B , Kyes S , McLean J , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 400 :532 , 1999
Abstract : Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 3, and comparison with chromosome 2, highlights novel features of chromosome organization and gene structure. The sub-telomeric regions of chromosome 3 show a conserved order of features, including repetitive DNA sequences, members of multigene families involved in pathogenesis and antigenic variation, a number of conserved pseudogenes, and several genes of unknown function. A putative centromere has been identified that has a core region of about 2 kilobases with an extremely high (adenine + thymidine) composition and arrays of tandem repeats. We have predicted 215 protein-coding genes and two transfer RNA genes in the 1,060,106-base-pair chromosome sequence. The predicted protein-coding genes can be divided into three main classes: 52.6% are not spliced, 45.1% have a large exon with short additional 5' or 3' exons, and 2.3% have a multiple exon structure more typical of higher eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
PubMedSearch : Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
PubMedID: 10448855
Gene_locus related to this paper: plafa-PFC0950C

Title : Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence - Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
Author(s) : Cole ST , Brosch R , Parkhill J , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Gordon SV , Eiglmeier K , Gas S , Barry CE, 3rd , Tekaia F , Badcock K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies R , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Krogh A , McLean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Osborne J , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Rutter S , Seeger K , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 393 :537 , 1998
Abstract : Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,529 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. M. tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation.
ESTHER : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedSearch : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedID: 9634230
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-cut3 , myctu-cutas1 , myctu-cutas2 , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-lipJ , myctu-LIPS , myctu-lipv , myctu-LPQC , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT1628 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-RV3473C , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28