Orvis J

References (4)

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx

Title : Draft genome sequence of the oilseed species Ricinus communis - Chan_2010_Nat.Biotechnol_28_951
Author(s) : Chan AP , Crabtree J , Zhao Q , Lorenzi H , Orvis J , Puiu D , Melake-Berhan A , Jones KM , Redman J , Chen G , Cahoon EB , Gedil M , Stanke M , Haas BJ , Wortman JR , Fraser-Liggett CM , Ravel J , Rabinowicz PD
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 28 :951 , 2010
Abstract : Castor bean (Ricinus communis) is an oilseed crop that belongs to the spurge (Euphorbiaceae) family, which comprises approximately 6,300 species that include cassava (Manihot esculenta), rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and physic nut (Jatropha curcas). It is primarily of economic interest as a source of castor oil, used for the production of high-quality lubricants because of its high proportion of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleic acid. However, castor bean genomics is also relevant to biosecurity as the seeds contain high levels of ricin, a highly toxic, ribosome-inactivating protein. Here we report the draft genome sequence of castor bean (4.6-fold coverage), the first for a member of the Euphorbiaceae. Whereas most of the key genes involved in oil synthesis and turnover are single copy, the number of members of the ricin gene family is larger than previously thought. Comparative genomics analysis suggests the presence of an ancient hexaploidization event that is conserved across the dicotyledonous lineage.
ESTHER : Chan_2010_Nat.Biotechnol_28_951
PubMedSearch : Chan_2010_Nat.Biotechnol_28_951
PubMedID: 20729833
Gene_locus related to this paper: ricco-b9r7h7 , ricco-b9re31 , ricco-b9rgi7 , ricco-b9riy7 , ricco-b9rlg6 , ricco-b9rm64 , ricco-b9rsg5 , ricco-b9rtk6 , ricco-b9rtt3 , ricco-b9ry83 , ricco-b9s8p2 , ricco-b9s817 , ricco-b9sby7 , ricco-b9scn1 , ricco-b9scn2 , ricco-b9scn3 , ricco-b9scn5 , ricco-b9ssj7 , ricco-b9ssj8 , ricco-b9sx01 , ricco-b9szu0 , ricco-b9t4l4 , ricco-b9t5x2 , ricco-b9tb84 , ricco-b9rkb0 , ricco-b9rru1 , ricco-b9rdy5 , ricco-b9tey4 , ricco-b9sfw5 , ricco-b9sjw6 , ricco-b9shs6 , ricco-b9rsl2 , ricco-b9r7f8 , ricco-b9rne4 , ricco-b9r8z8 , ricco-b9rf65 , ricco-b9rjk8 , ricco-b9sip5 , ricco-b9t3r4

Title : Genomic islands in the pathogenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
Author(s) : Fedorova ND , Khaldi N , Joardar VS , Maiti R , Amedeo P , Anderson MJ , Crabtree J , Silva JC , Badger JH , Albarraq A , Angiuoli S , Bussey H , Bowyer P , Cotty PJ , Dyer PS , Egan A , Galens K , Fraser-Liggett CM , Haas BJ , Inman JM , Kent R , Lemieux S , Malavazi I , Orvis J , Roemer T , Ronning CM , Sundaram JP , Sutton G , Turner G , Venter JC , White OR , Whitty BR , Youngman P , Wolfe KH , Goldman GH , Wortman JR , Jiang B , Denning DW , Nierman WC
Ref : PLoS Genet , 4 :e1000046 , 2008
Abstract : We present the genome sequences of a new clinical isolate of the important human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, A1163, and two closely related but rarely pathogenic species, Neosartorya fischeri NRRL181 and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1. Comparative genomic analysis of A1163 with the recently sequenced A. fumigatus isolate Af293 has identified core, variable and up to 2% unique genes in each genome. While the core genes are 99.8% identical at the nucleotide level, identity for variable genes can be as low 40%. The most divergent loci appear to contain heterokaryon incompatibility (het) genes associated with fungal programmed cell death such as developmental regulator rosA. Cross-species comparison has revealed that 8.5%, 13.5% and 12.6%, respectively, of A. fumigatus, N. fischeri and A. clavatus genes are species-specific. These genes are significantly smaller in size than core genes, contain fewer exons and exhibit a subtelomeric bias. Most of them cluster together in 13 chromosomal islands, which are enriched for pseudogenes, transposons and other repetitive elements. At least 20% of A. fumigatus-specific genes appear to be functional and involved in carbohydrate and chitin catabolism, transport, detoxification, secondary metabolism and other functions that may facilitate the adaptation to heterogeneous environments such as soil or a mammalian host. Contrary to what was suggested previously, their origin cannot be attributed to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), but instead is likely to involve duplication, diversification and differential gene loss (DDL). The role of duplication in the origin of lineage-specific genes is further underlined by the discovery of genomic islands that seem to function as designated "gene dumps" and, perhaps, simultaneously, as "gene factories".
ESTHER : Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
PubMedSearch : Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
PubMedID: 18404212
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspcl-a1c4m6 , aspcl-a1c5a7 , aspcl-a1c6w3 , aspcl-a1c8p7 , aspcl-a1c8q9 , aspcl-a1c9k4 , aspcl-a1c759 , aspcl-a1c786 , aspcl-a1c823 , aspcl-a1c859 , aspcl-a1c881 , aspcl-a1c994 , aspcl-a1cag4 , aspcl-a1caj8 , aspcl-a1cas0 , aspcl-a1cc86 , aspcl-a1ccq2 , aspcl-a1cfv7 , aspcl-a1chj6 , aspcl-a1cif4 , aspcl-a1ck14 , aspcl-a1cke4 , aspcl-a1ckq1 , aspcl-a1cli1 , aspcl-a1cln8 , aspcl-a1cm72 , aspcl-a1cns2 , aspcl-a1cpk9 , aspcl-a1cra8 , aspcl-a1crr5 , aspcl-a1crs9 , aspcl-a1cs04 , aspcl-a1cs39 , aspcl-a1cu39 , aspcl-atg15 , aspcl-axe1 , aspcl-cuti1 , aspcl-cuti3 , aspcl-dapb , aspcl-dpp4 , aspcl-dpp5 , aspcl-faeb , aspcl-faec1 , aspcl-faec2 , aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-b0y2h6 , aspfc-b0y962 , aspfc-b0yaj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-DPP4 , aspfu-faeb1 , aspfu-faec , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4w9r3 , aspfu-q4w9t5 , aspfu-q4w9z4 , aspfu-q4wa57 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wag0 , aspfu-q4wal3 , aspfu-q4wbc5 , aspfu-q4wbj7 , aspfu-q4wdg2 , aspfu-q4wf06 , aspfu-q4wf29 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wfq9 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wgm4 , aspfu-q4win2 , aspfu-q4wk31 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wk90 , aspfu-q4wm12 , aspfu-q4wm84 , aspfu-q4wm86 , aspfu-q4wmr0 , aspfu-q4wny7 , aspfu-q4wp19 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqj8 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wrr7 , aspfu-q4wu51 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wui7 , aspfu-q4wuk8 , aspfu-q4wum3 , aspfu-q4wuw0 , aspfu-q4wvy1 , aspfu-q4ww22 , aspfu-q4wx13 , aspfu-q4wxd0 , aspfu-q4wxe4 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4wyq5 , aspfu-q4wz16 , aspfu-q4wzd5 , aspfu-q4wzh6 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q4x1w9 , aspfu-q4x078 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1d4m8 , neofi-a1d4p0 , neofi-a1d5p2 , neofi-a1d104 , neofi-a1d380 , neofi-a1d512 , neofi-a1d654 , neofi-a1da18 , neofi-a1dal8 , neofi-a1df46 , neofi-a1dhj0 , neofi-a1di44 , neofi-a1dk35 , neofi-a1dki7 , neofi-a1dkt6 , neofi-a1dn55 , neofi-atg15 , neofi-axe1 , neofi-faeb1 , neofi-faeb2 , neofi-faec , aspcl-a1cd34 , aspcl-a1cd88 , neofi-a1dc66 , aspcl-a1ceh5 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspcl-a1cqb5 , aspcl-a1cs44 , neofi-a1d517 , neofi-a1dbz0 , neofi-a1cuz0 , aspcl-a1c5e8 , neofi-a1d0b8 , aspcl-a1cdf0 , aspcl-a1ccd3 , neofi-a1da82 , neofi-a1d5e6 , aspcl-kex1 , aspcl-cbpya

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49