Olson M

References (3)

Title : Widespread divergence between incipient Anopheles gambiae species revealed by whole genome sequences - Lawniczak_2010_Science_330_512
Author(s) : Lawniczak MK , Emrich SJ , Holloway AK , Regier AP , Olson M , White B , Redmond S , Fulton L , Appelbaum E , Godfrey J , Farmer C , Chinwalla A , Yang SP , Minx P , Nelson J , Kyung K , Walenz BP , Garcia-Hernandez E , Aguiar M , Viswanathan LD , Rogers YH , Strausberg RL , Saski CA , Lawson D , Collins FH , Kafatos FC , Christophides GK , Clifton SW , Kirkness EF , Besansky NJ
Ref : Science , 330 :512 , 2010
Abstract : The Afrotropical mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, a major vector of malaria, is currently undergoing speciation into the M and S molecular forms. These forms have diverged in larval ecology and reproductive behavior through unknown genetic mechanisms, despite considerable levels of hybridization. Previous genome-wide scans using gene-based microarrays uncovered divergence between M and S that was largely confined to gene-poor pericentromeric regions, prompting a speciation-with-ongoing-gene-flow model that implicated only about 3% of the genome near centromeres in the speciation process. Here, based on the complete M and S genome sequences, we report widespread and heterogeneous genomic divergence inconsistent with appreciable levels of interform gene flow, suggesting a more advanced speciation process and greater challenges to identify genes critical to initiating that process.
ESTHER : Lawniczak_2010_Science_330_512
PubMedSearch : Lawniczak_2010_Science_330_512
PubMedID: 20966253
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-Q7PVF9 , anoga-q7q837 , 9dipt-a0a182ksz6 , anost-a0a182xxz0 , anost-a0a182xzf1 , anoga-q7q887

Title : The sequence and de novo assembly of the giant panda genome - Li_2010_Nature_463_311
Author(s) : Li R , Fan W , Tian G , Zhu H , He L , Cai J , Huang Q , Cai Q , Li B , Bai Y , Zhang Z , Zhang Y , Wang W , Li J , Wei F , Li H , Jian M , Nielsen R , Li D , Gu W , Yang Z , Xuan Z , Ryder OA , Leung FC , Zhou Y , Cao J , Sun X , Fu Y , Fang X , Guo X , Wang B , Hou R , Shen F , Mu B , Ni P , Lin R , Qian W , Wang G , Yu C , Nie W , Wang J , Wu Z , Liang H , Min J , Wu Q , Cheng S , Ruan J , Wang M , Shi Z , Wen M , Liu B , Ren X , Zheng H , Dong D , Cook K , Shan G , Zhang H , Kosiol C , Xie X , Lu Z , Li Y , Steiner CC , Lam TT , Lin S , Zhang Q , Li G , Tian J , Gong T , Liu H , Zhang D , Fang L , Ye C , Zhang J , Hu W , Xu A , Ren Y , Zhang G , Bruford MW , Li Q , Ma L , Guo Y , An N , Hu Y , Zheng Y , Shi Y , Li Z , Liu Q , Chen Y , Zhao J , Qu N , Zhao S , Tian F , Wang X , Wang H , Xu L , Liu X , Vinar T , Wang Y , Lam TW , Yiu SM , Liu S , Huang Y , Yang G , Jiang Z , Qin N , Li L , Bolund L , Kristiansen K , Wong GK , Olson M , Zhang X , Li S , Yang H
Ref : Nature , 463 :311 , 2010
Abstract : Using next-generation sequencing technology alone, we have successfully generated and assembled a draft sequence of the giant panda genome. The assembled contigs (2.25 gigabases (Gb)) cover approximately 94% of the whole genome, and the remaining gaps (0.05 Gb) seem to contain carnivore-specific repeats and tandem repeats. Comparisons with the dog and human showed that the panda genome has a lower divergence rate. The assessment of panda genes potentially underlying some of its unique traits indicated that its bamboo diet might be more dependent on its gut microbiome than its own genetic composition. We also identified more than 2.7 million heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the diploid genome. Our data and analyses provide a foundation for promoting mammalian genetic research, and demonstrate the feasibility for using next-generation sequencing technologies for accurate, cost-effective and rapid de novo assembly of large eukaryotic genomes.
ESTHER : Li_2010_Nature_463_311
PubMedSearch : Li_2010_Nature_463_311
PubMedID: 20010809
Gene_locus related to this paper: ailme-ABH15 , ailme-ACHE , ailme-BCHE , ailme-d2gtv3 , ailme-d2gty9 , ailme-d2gu87 , ailme-d2gu97 , ailme-d2gve7 , ailme-d2gwu1 , ailme-d2gx08 , ailme-d2gyt0 , ailme-d2gz36 , ailme-d2gz37 , ailme-d2gz38 , ailme-d2gz39 , ailme-d2gz40 , ailme-d2h5r9 , ailme-d2h7b7 , ailme-d2h9c9 , ailme-d2h794 , ailme-d2hau7 , ailme-d2hau8 , ailme-d2hcd9 , ailme-d2hdi6 , ailme-d2heu6 , ailme-d2hga4 , ailme-d2hqw5 , ailme-d2hs98 , ailme-d2hsx4 , ailme-d2hti6 , ailme-d2htv3 , ailme-d2htz6 , ailme-d2huc7 , ailme-d2hwj8 , ailme-d2hwy7 , ailme-d2hxm1 , ailme-d2hyc8 , ailme-d2hyv2 , ailme-d2hz11 , ailme-d2hza3 , ailme-d2hzr4 , ailme-d2i1l4 , ailme-d2i2g8 , ailme-g1l7m3 , ailme-g1lu36 , ailme-g1m769 , ailme-g1mc29 , ailme-g1mdj8 , ailme-g1mdr5 , ailme-g1mfp4 , ailme-g1mfx5 , ailme-g1lj41 , ailme-g1lm28 , ailme-g1l3u1 , ailme-g1l7l1 , ailme-g1m5i3 , ailme-g1l2f6 , ailme-g1lji5 , ailme-g1lqk3 , ailme-g1l8s9 , ailme-d2h717 , ailme-d2h718 , ailme-d2h719 , ailme-d2h720 , ailme-g1m5v0 , ailme-g1m5y7 , ailme-g1lkt7 , ailme-g1l2a1 , ailme-g1lsc8 , ailme-g1lrp4 , ailme-d2gv02 , ailme-g1mik5 , ailme-g1ljr1 , ailme-g1lxw7 , ailme-d2h8b5 , ailme-d2h2r2 , ailme-d2h9w7 , ailme-g1meh3 , ailme-g1m719

Title : The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3 - Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
Author(s) : Muzny DM , Scherer SE , Kaul R , Wang J , Yu J , Sudbrak R , Buhay CJ , Chen R , Cree A , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Gill R , Gunaratne P , Harris RA , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hodgson AV , Hume J , Jackson A , Khan ZM , Kovar-Smith C , Lewis LR , Lozado RJ , Metzker ML , Milosavljevic A , Miner GR , Morgan MB , Nazareth LV , Scott G , Sodergren E , Song XZ , Steffen D , Wei S , Wheeler DA , Wright MW , Worley KC , Yuan Y , Zhang Z , Adams CQ , Ansari-Lari MA , Ayele M , Brown MJ , Chen G , Chen Z , Clendenning J , Clerc-Blankenburg KP , Davis C , Delgado O , Dinh HH , Dong W , Draper H , Ernst S , Fu G , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Garcia DK , Gillett W , Gu J , Hao B , Haugen E , Havlak P , He X , Hennig S , Hu S , Huang W , Jackson LR , Jacob LS , Kelly SH , Kube M , Levy R , Li Z , Liu B , Liu J , Liu W , Lu J , Maheshwari M , Nguyen BV , Okwuonu GO , Palmeiri A , Pasternak S , Perez LM , Phelps KA , Plopper FJ , Qiang B , Raymond C , Rodriguez R , Saenphimmachak C , Santibanez J , Shen H , Shen Y , Subramanian S , Tabor PE , Verduzco D , Waldron L , Wang Q , Williams GA , Wong GK , Yao Z , Zhang J , Zhang X , Zhao G , Zhou J , Zhou Y , Nelson D , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Naylor SL , Yang H , Olson M , Weinstock G , Gibbs RA
Ref : Nature , 440 :1194 , 2006
Abstract : After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chromosomes. Chromosome 3 comprises just four contigs, one of which currently represents the longest unbroken stretch of finished DNA sequence known so far. The chromosome is remarkable in having the lowest rate of segmental duplication in the genome. It also includes a chemokine receptor gene cluster as well as numerous loci involved in multiple human cancers such as the gene encoding FHIT, which contains the most common constitutive fragile site in the genome, FRA3B. Using genomic sequence from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque, we were able to characterize the breakpoints defining a large pericentric inversion that occurred some time after the split of Homininae from Ponginae, and propose an evolutionary history of the inversion.
ESTHER : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedSearch : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedID: 16641997
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-AADACL2 , human-ABHD5 , human-ABHD6 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD14A , human-APEH , human-BCHE , human-CIB , human-LIPH , human-MGLL , human-NLGN1 , human-PLA1A