Gill J

References (5)

Title : The genome sequence of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough - Heidelberg_2004_Nat.Biotechnol_22_554
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Seshadri R , Haveman SA , Hemme CL , Paulsen IT , Kolonay JF , Eisen JA , Ward N , Methe B , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Sullivan SA , Fouts D , Haft DH , Selengut J , Peterson JD , Davidsen TM , Zafar N , Zhou L , Radune D , Dimitrov G , Hance M , Tran K , Khouri H , Gill J , Utterback TR , Feldblyum TV , Wall JD , Voordouw G , Fraser CM
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 22 :554 , 2004
Abstract : Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a model organism for studying the energy metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and for understanding the economic impacts of SRB, including biocorrosion of metal infrastructure and bioremediation of toxic metal ions. The 3,570,858 base pair (bp) genome sequence reveals a network of novel c-type cytochromes, connecting multiple periplasmic hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases, as a key feature of its energy metabolism. The relative arrangement of genes encoding enzymes for energy transduction, together with inferred cellular location of the enzymes, provides a basis for proposing an expansion to the 'hydrogen-cycling' model for increasing energy efficiency in this bacterium. Plasmid-encoded functions include modification of cell surface components, nitrogen fixation and a type-III protein secretion system. This genome sequence represents a substantial step toward the elucidation of pathways for reduction (and bioremediation) of pollutants such as uranium and chromium and offers a new starting point for defining this organism's complex anaerobic respiration.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2004_Nat.Biotechnol_22_554
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2004_Nat.Biotechnol_22_554
PubMedID: 15077118
Gene_locus related to this paper: desvh-q72b36 , desvh-q72ed6 , desvh-q728i3 , desvh-q729w4 , desvh-q72b15

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae - Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Masignani V , Cieslewicz MJ , Eisen JA , Peterson S , Wessels MR , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Margarit I , Read TD , Madoff LC , Wolf AM , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Lewis MR , Radune D , Fedorova NB , Scanlan D , Khouri H , Mulligan S , Carty HA , Cline RT , Van Aken SE , Gill J , Scarselli M , Mora M , Iacobini ET , Brettoni C , Galli G , Mariani M , Vegni F , Maione D , Rinaudo D , Rappuoli R , Telford JL , Kasper DL , Grandi G , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :12391 , 2002
Abstract : The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the other completely sequenced genomes identified genes specific to the streptococci and to S. agalactiae. These in silico analyses, combined with comparative genome hybridization experiments between the sequenced serotype V strain 2603 V/R and 19 S. agalactiae strains from several serotypes using whole-genome microarrays, revealed the genetic heterogeneity among S. agalactiae strains, even of the same serotype, and provided insights into the evolution of virulence mechanisms.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
PubMedID: 12200547
Gene_locus related to this paper: strag-ESTA , strag-GBS0040 , strag-GBS1828 , strag-pepx , strag-SAG0108 , strag-SAG0246 , strag-SAG0383 , strag-SAG0521 , strag-SAG0679 , strag-SAG0680 , strag-SAG0681 , strag-SAG0785 , strag-SAG0912 , strag-SAG1040 , strag-SAG1562 , strag-SAG2132

Title : Whole-genome comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical and laboratory strains - Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
Author(s) : Fleischmann RD , Alland D , Eisen JA , Carpenter L , White O , Peterson J , Deboy R , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Haft D , Hickey E , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Umayam LA , Ermolaeva M , Salzberg SL , Delcher A , Utterback T , Weidman J , Khouri H , Gill J , Mikula A , Bishai W , Jacobs Jr WR, Jr. , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 184 :5479 , 2002
Abstract : Virulence and immunity are poorly understood in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We sequenced the complete genome of the M. tuberculosis clinical strain CDC1551 and performed a whole-genome comparison with the laboratory strain H37Rv in order to identify polymorphic sequences with potential relevance to disease pathogenesis, immunity, and evolution. We found large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in numerous genes. Polymorphic loci included a phospholipase C, a membrane lipoprotein, members of an adenylate cyclase gene family, and members of the PE/PPE gene family, some of which have been implicated in virulence or the host immune response. Several gene families, including the PE/PPE gene family, also had significantly higher synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution frequencies compared to the genome as a whole. We tested a large sample of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates for a subset of the large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and found widespread genetic variability at many of these loci. We performed phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis to investigate the evolutionary relationships among isolates and the origins of specific polymorphic loci. A number of these polymorphisms appear to have occurred multiple times as independent events, suggesting that these changes may be under selective pressure. Together, these results demonstrate that polymorphisms among M. tuberculosis strains are more extensive than initially anticipated, and genetic variation may have an important role in disease pathogenesis and immunity.
ESTHER : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedSearch : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedID: 12218036
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Genome sequence of the dissimilatory metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis - Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Gaidos EJ , Nelson WC , Read TD , Eisen JA , Seshadri R , Ward N , Methe B , Clayton RA , Meyer T , Tsapin A , Scott J , Beanan M , Brinkac L , Daugherty S , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Wolf AM , Vamathevan J , Weidman J , Impraim M , Lee K , Berry K , Lee C , Mueller J , Khouri H , Gill J , Utterback TR , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Smith HO , Venter JC , Nealson KH , Fraser CM
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 20 :1118 , 2002
Abstract : Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities, conferred in part by multicomponent, branched electron transport systems. Here we report the sequencing of the S. oneidensis genome, which consists of a 4,969,803-base pair circular chromosome with 4,758 predicted protein-encoding open reading frames (CDS) and a 161,613-base pair plasmid with 173 CDSs. We identified the first Shewanella lambda-like phage, providing a potential tool for further genome engineering. Genome analysis revealed 39 c-type cytochromes, including 32 previously unidentified in S. oneidensis, and a novel periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase, which are integral members of the electron transport system. This genome sequence represents a critical step in the elucidation of the pathways for reduction (and bioremediation) of pollutants such as uranium (U) and chromium (Cr), and offers a starting point for defining this organism's complex electron transport systems and metal ion-reducing capabilities.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedID: 12368813
Gene_locus related to this paper: sheon-BIOH , sheon-LYPA , sheon-PIP , sheon-PTRB , sheon-q8ej95 , sheon-SO0071 , sheon-SO0614 , sheon-SO0616 , sheon-SO0801 , sheon-SO0880 , sheoe-SO0967 , sheon-SO1006 , sheon-SO1224 , sheon-SO1310 , sheon-SO1534 , sheon-SO1539 , sheon-SO1686 , sheon-SO1743 , sheon-SO1976 , sheon-SO1999 , sheon-SO2024 , sheon-SO2047 , sheon-SO2055 , sheon-SO2223 , sheon-SO2333 , sheon-SO2473 , sheon-SO2582 , sheon-SO2753 , sheon-SO2934 , sheon-SO3025 , sheon-SO3900 , sheon-SO3990 , sheon-SO4252 , sheon-SO4400 , sheon-SO4537 , sheon-SO4543 , sheon-SO4574 , sheon-SO4618 , sheon-SO4650 , sheon-SOA0048 , shefn-SfSFGH , sheon-ym51

Title : Complete genome sequence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 - Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Saunders NJ , Heidelberg J , Jeffries AC , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Ketchum KA , Hood DW , Peden JF , Dodson RJ , Nelson WC , Gwinn ML , Deboy R , Peterson JD , Hickey EK , Haft DH , Salzberg SL , White O , Fleischmann RD , Dougherty BA , Mason T , Ciecko A , Parksey DS , Blair E , Cittone H , Clark EB , Cotton MD , Utterback TR , Khouri H , Qin H , Vamathevan J , Gill J , Scarlato V , Masignani V , Pizza M , Grandi G , Sun L , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Moxon ER , Rappuoli R , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :1809 , 2000
Abstract : The 2,272,351-base pair genome of Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 (serogroup B), a causative agent of meningitis and septicemia, contains 2158 predicted coding regions, 1158 (53.7%) of which were assigned a biological role. Three major islands of horizontal DNA transfer were identified; two of these contain genes encoding proteins involved in pathogenicity, and the third island contains coding sequences only for hypothetical proteins. Insights into the commensal and virulence behavior of N. meningitidis can be gleaned from the genome, in which sequences for structural proteins of the pilus are clustered and several coding regions unique to serogroup B capsular polysaccharide synthesis can be identified. Finally, N. meningitidis contains more genes that undergo phase variation than any pathogen studied to date, a mechanism that controls their expression and contributes to the evasion of the host immune system.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedID: 10710307
Gene_locus related to this paper: neigo-pip , neima-metx , neimb-q9k0t9 , neime-ESD , neime-NMA2216 , neime-NMB0276 , neime-NMB0868 , neime-NMB1828 , neime-NMB1877