Gwinn M

References (10)

Title : Comparative genomics of emerging human ehrlichiosis agents - Dunning Hotopp_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e21
Author(s) : Dunning Hotopp JC , Lin M , Madupu R , Crabtree J , Angiuoli SV , Eisen JA , Seshadri R , Ren Q , Wu M , Utterback TR , Smith S , Lewis M , Khouri H , Zhang C , Niu H , Lin Q , Ohashi N , Zhi N , Nelson W , Brinkac LM , Dodson RJ , Rosovitz MJ , Sundaram J , Daugherty SC , Davidsen T , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Haft DH , Selengut JD , Sullivan SA , Zafar N , Zhou L , Benahmed F , Forberger H , Halpin R , Mulligan S , Robinson J , White O , Rikihisa Y , Tettelin H
Ref : PLoS Genet , 2 :e21 , 2006
Abstract : Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia) phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Neorickettsia (formerly Ehrlichia) sennetsu are intracellular vector-borne pathogens that cause human ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. We present the complete genome sequences of these organisms along with comparisons to other organisms in the Rickettsiales order. Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. display a unique large expansion of immunodominant outer membrane proteins facilitating antigenic variation. All Rickettsiales have a diminished ability to synthesize amino acids compared to their closest free-living relatives. Unlike members of the Rickettsiaceae family, these pathogenic Anaplasmataceae are capable of making all major vitamins, cofactors, and nucleotides, which could confer a beneficial role in the invertebrate vector or the vertebrate host. Further analysis identified proteins potentially involved in vacuole confinement of the Anaplasmataceae, a life cycle involving a hematophagous vector, vertebrate pathogenesis, human pathogenesis, and lack of transovarial transmission. These discoveries provide significant insights into the biology of these obligate intracellular pathogens.
ESTHER : Dunning Hotopp_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e21
PubMedSearch : Dunning Hotopp_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e21
PubMedID: 16482227
Gene_locus related to this paper: anapz-q2gj80 , anapz-q2gle9 , anapz-q2glf0 , anapz-q2gln7 , ehrch-q40iu0 , ehrch-q40jj7 , ehrcr-q2gfq9 , neosm-q2gcq8 , neosm-q2gdf2 , neosm-q2gcn8 , anapz-q2gk48 , ehrcr-q2ggj6

Title : The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames and comparison to closely related bacteria - Read_2003_Nature_423_81
Author(s) : Read TD , Peterson SN , Tourasse N , Baillie LW , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Gill SR , Holtzapple EK , Okstad OA , Helgason E , Rilstone J , Wu M , Kolonay JF , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Gwinn M , DeBoy RT , Madpu R , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Pop M , Khouri HM , Radune D , Benton JL , Mahamoud Y , Jiang L , Hance IR , Weidman JF , Berry KJ , Plaut RD , Wolf AM , Watkins KL , Nierman WC , Hazen A , Cline R , Redmond C , Thwaite JE , White O , Salzberg SL , Thomason B , Friedlander AM , Koehler TM , Hanna PC , Kolsto AB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 423 :81 , 2003
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis is an endospore-forming bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax. Key virulence genes are found on plasmids (extra-chromosomal, circular, double-stranded DNA molecules) pXO1 (ref. 2) and pXO2 (ref. 3). To identify additional genes that might contribute to virulence, we analysed the complete sequence of the chromosome of B. anthracis Ames (about 5.23 megabases). We found several chromosomally encoded proteins that may contribute to pathogenicity--including haemolysins, phospholipases and iron acquisition functions--and identified numerous surface proteins that might be important targets for vaccines and drugs. Almost all these putative chromosomal virulence and surface proteins have homologues in Bacillus cereus, highlighting the similarity of B. anthracis to near-neighbours that are not associated with anthrax. By performing a comparative genome hybridization of 19 B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains against a B. anthracis DNA microarray, we confirmed the general similarity of chromosomal genes among this group of close relatives. However, we found that the gene sequences of pXO1 and pXO2 were more variable between strains, suggesting plasmid mobility in the group. The complete sequence of B. anthracis is a step towards a better understanding of anthrax pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedID: 12721629
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0160 , bacan-BA0950 , bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA1747 , bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA1914 , bacan-BA2015 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2417 , bacan-BA2557 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA2687 , bacan-BA2694 , bacan-BA2738 , bacan-BA2865 , bacan-BA3068 , bacan-BA3165 , bacan-BA3178 , bacan-BA3187 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3372 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA3887 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4328 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA4983 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacan-q81tt2 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx

Title : Genome of Geobacter sulfurreducens: metal reduction in subsurface environments - Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
Author(s) : Methe BA , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Paulsen IT , Nelson W , Heidelberg JF , Wu D , Wu M , Ward N , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Sullivan SA , Haft DH , Selengut J , Davidsen TM , Zafar N , White O , Tran B , Romero C , Forberger HA , Weidman J , Khouri H , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Van Aken SE , Lovley DR , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 302 :1967 , 2003
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a delta-proteobacterium, reveals unsuspected capabilities, including evidence of aerobic metabolism, one-carbon and complex carbon metabolism, motility, and chemotactic behavior. These characteristics, coupled with the possession of many two-component sensors and many c-type cytochromes, reveal an ability to create alternative, redundant, electron transport networks and offer insights into the process of metal ion reduction in subsurface environments. As well as playing roles in the global cycling of metals and carbon, this organism clearly has the potential for use in bioremediation of radioactive metals and in the generation of electricity.
ESTHER : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedSearch : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedID: 14671304
Gene_locus related to this paper: geosl-q74a54 , geosl-q74ac8 , geosl-q74eb1 , geosl-q747u4 , geosl-q747v8 , geosl-q749w4

Title : Complete genome sequence of the oral pathogenic Bacterium porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 - Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fleischmann RD , DeBoy RT , Paulsen IT , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Mason T , Tallon L , Gray J , Granger D , Tettelin H , Dong H , Galvin JL , Duncan MJ , Dewhirst FE , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 185 :5591 , 2003
Abstract : The complete 2,343,479-bp genome sequence of the gram-negative, pathogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83, a major contributor to periodontal disease, was determined. Whole-genome comparative analysis with other available complete genome sequences confirms the close relationship between the Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (CFB) phylum and the green-sulfur bacteria. Within the CFB phyla, the genomes most similar to that of P. gingivalis are those of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and B. fragilis. Outside of the CFB phyla the most similar genome to P. gingivalis is that of Chlorobium tepidum, supporting the previous phylogenetic studies that indicated that the Chlorobia and CFB phyla are related, albeit distantly. Genome analysis of strain W83 reveals a range of pathways and virulence determinants that relate to the novel biology of this oral pathogen. Among these determinants are at least six putative hemagglutinin-like genes and 36 previously unidentified peptidases. Genome analysis also reveals that P. gingivalis can metabolize a range of amino acids and generate a number of metabolic end products that are toxic to the human host or human gingival tissue and contribute to the development of periodontal disease.
ESTHER : Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
PubMedID: 12949112
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9gamm-q4a538 , porgi-DPP , porgi-q7mtk3 , porgi-q7mu18 , porgi-q7mub3 , porgi-q7muw6 , porgi-q7mvp4 , porgi-q7mwa7 , porgi-q7mx03

Title : Whole-genome comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical and laboratory strains - Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
Author(s) : Fleischmann RD , Alland D , Eisen JA , Carpenter L , White O , Peterson J , Deboy R , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Haft D , Hickey E , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Umayam LA , Ermolaeva M , Salzberg SL , Delcher A , Utterback T , Weidman J , Khouri H , Gill J , Mikula A , Bishai W , Jacobs Jr WR, Jr. , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 184 :5479 , 2002
Abstract : Virulence and immunity are poorly understood in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We sequenced the complete genome of the M. tuberculosis clinical strain CDC1551 and performed a whole-genome comparison with the laboratory strain H37Rv in order to identify polymorphic sequences with potential relevance to disease pathogenesis, immunity, and evolution. We found large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in numerous genes. Polymorphic loci included a phospholipase C, a membrane lipoprotein, members of an adenylate cyclase gene family, and members of the PE/PPE gene family, some of which have been implicated in virulence or the host immune response. Several gene families, including the PE/PPE gene family, also had significantly higher synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution frequencies compared to the genome as a whole. We tested a large sample of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates for a subset of the large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and found widespread genetic variability at many of these loci. We performed phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis to investigate the evolutionary relationships among isolates and the origins of specific polymorphic loci. A number of these polymorphisms appear to have occurred multiple times as independent events, suggesting that these changes may be under selective pressure. Together, these results demonstrate that polymorphisms among M. tuberculosis strains are more extensive than initially anticipated, and genetic variation may have an important role in disease pathogenesis and immunity.
ESTHER : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedSearch : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedID: 12218036
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae - Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Read TD , Peterson S , Heidelberg J , DeBoy RT , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Salzberg SL , Lewis MR , Radune D , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Wolf AM , Utterback TR , Hansen CL , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Angiuoli S , Dickinson T , Hickey EK , Holt IE , Loftus BJ , Yang F , Smith HO , Venter JC , Dougherty BA , Morrison DA , Hollingshead SK , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 293 :498 , 2001
Abstract : The 2,160,837-base pair genome sequence of an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and otitis media, contains 2236 predicted coding regions; of these, 1440 (64%) were assigned a biological role. Approximately 5% of the genome is composed of insertion sequences that may contribute to genome rearrangements through uptake of foreign DNA. Extracellular enzyme systems for the metabolism of polysaccharides and hexosamines provide a substantial source of carbon and nitrogen for S. pneumoniae and also damage host tissues and facilitate colonization. A motif identified within the signal peptide of proteins is potentially involved in targeting these proteins to the cell surface of low-guanine/cytosine (GC) Gram-positive species. Several surface-exposed proteins that may serve as potential vaccine candidates were identified. Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedID: 11463916
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpj-b8zns7 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-b2dz20 , strpn-pepx , strpn-SP0614 , strpn-SP0666 , strpn-SP0777 , strpn-SP0902 , strpn-SP1343

Title : Genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis MoPn and Chlamydia pneumoniae AR39 - Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
Author(s) : Read TD , Brunham RC , Shen C , Gill SR , Heidelberg JF , White O , Hickey EK , Peterson J , Utterback T , Berry K , Bass S , Linher K , Weidman J , Khouri H , Craven B , Bowman C , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Nelson W , Deboy R , Kolonay J , McClarty G , Salzberg SL , Eisen J , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 28 :1397 , 2000
Abstract : The genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) strain Nigg (1 069 412 nt) and Chlamydia pneumoniae strain AR39 (1 229 853 nt) were determined using a random shotgun strategy. The MoPn genome exhibited a general conservation of gene order and content with the previously sequenced C.trachomatis serovar D. Differences between C.trachomatis strains were focused on an approximately 50 kb 'plasticity zone' near the termination origins. In this region MoPn contained three copies of a novel gene encoding a >3000 amino acid toxin homologous to a predicted toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7 but had apparently lost the tryptophan biosyntheis genes found in serovar D in this region. The C. pneumoniae AR39 chromosome was >99.9% identical to the previously sequenced C.pneumoniae CWL029 genome, however, comparative analysis identified an invertible DNA segment upstream of the uridine kinase gene which was in different orientations in the two genomes. AR39 also contained a novel 4524 nt circular single-stranded (ss)DNA bacteriophage, the first time a virus has been reported infecting C. pneumoniae. Although the chlamydial genomes were highly conserved, there were intriguing differences in key nucleotide salvage pathways: C.pneumoniae has a uridine kinase gene for dUTP production, MoPn has a uracil phosphororibosyl transferase, while C.trachomatis serovar D contains neither gene. Chromosomal comparison revealed that there had been multiple large inversion events since the species divergence of C.trachomatis and C.pneumoniae, apparently oriented around the axis of the origin of replication and the termination region. The striking synteny of the Chlamydia genomes and prevalence of tandemly duplicated genes are evidence of minimal chromosome rearrangement and foreign gene uptake, presumably owing to the ecological isolation of the obligate intracellular parasites. In the absence of genetic analysis, comparative genomics will continue to provide insight into the virulence mechanisms of these important human pathogens.
ESTHER : Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
PubMedSearch : Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
PubMedID: 10684935
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlmu-TC0345 , chlmu-TC0413 , chlmu-TC0426 , chlmu-TC0478 , chlpn-CPJ0152 , chlpn-CPJ0342 , chlpn-CPN0161 , chlpn-CPN0271 , chlpn-q9jrv1 , chlpn-q9js10 , chlpn-q9k1u7 , chlpn-q9z6x9

Title : Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum, the Syphilis Spirochete - Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Norris SJ , Weinstock GM , White O , Sutton GG , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Clayton R , Ketchum KA , Sodergren E , Hardham JM , McLeod MP , Salzberg S , Peterson J , Khalak H , Richardson D , Howell JK , Chidambaram M , Utterback T , McDonald L , Artiach P , Bowman C , Cotton MD , Fujii C , Garland S , Hatch B , Horst K , Roberts K , Sandusky M , Weidman J , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 281 :375 , 1998
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum was determined and shown to be 1,138,006 base pairs containing 1041 predicted coding sequences (open reading frames). Systems for DNA replication, transcription, translation, and repair are intact, but catabolic and biosynthetic activities are minimized. The number of identifiable transporters is small, and no phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase carbohydrate transporters were found. Potential virulence factors include a family of 12 potential membrane proteins and several putative hemolysins. Comparison of the T. pallidum genome sequence with that of another pathogenic spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, identified unique and common genes and substantiates the considerable diversity observed among pathogenic spirochetes.
ESTHER : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedID: 9665876
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-naptd , trepa-TP0902 , trepa-TP0952

Title : The complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic, sulphate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus - Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
Author(s) : Klenk HP , Clayton RA , Tomb JF , White O , Nelson KE , Ketchum KA , Dodson RJ , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Richardson DL , Kerlavage AR , Graham DE , Kyrpides NC , Fleischmann RD , Quackenbush J , Lee NH , Sutton GG , Gill S , Kirkness EF , Dougherty BA , McKenney K , Adams MD , Loftus B , Peterson S , Reich CI , McNeil LK , Badger JH , Glodek A , Zhou L , Overbeek R , Gocayne JD , Weidman JF , McDonald L , Utterback T , Cotton MD , Spriggs T , Artiach P , Kaine BP , Sykes SM , Sadow PW , D'Andrea KP , Bowman C , Fujii C , Garland SA , Mason TM , Olsen GJ , Fraser CM , Smith HO , Woese CR , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 390 :364 , 1997
Abstract : Archaeoglobus fulgidus is the first sulphur-metabolizing organism to have its genome sequence determined. Its genome of 2,178,400 base pairs contains 2,436 open reading frames (ORFs). The information processing systems and the biosynthetic pathways for essential components (nucleotides, amino acids and cofactors) have extensive correlation with their counterparts in the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. The genomes of these two Archaea indicate dramatic differences in the way these organisms sense their environment, perform regulatory and transport functions, and gain energy. In contrast to M. jannaschii, A. fulgidus has fewer restriction-modification systems, and none of its genes appears to contain inteins. A quarter (651 ORFs) of the A. fulgidus genome encodes functionally uncharacterized yet conserved proteins, two-thirds of which are shared with M. jannaschii (428 ORFs). Another quarter of the genome encodes new proteins indicating substantial archaeal gene diversity.
ESTHER : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedSearch : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedID: 9389475
Gene_locus related to this paper: arcfu-AF0514 , arcfu-AF0675 , arcfu-AF1134 , arcfu-AF1563 , arcfu-AF1753 , arcfu-AF1763 , arcfu-est1 , arcfu-est2 , arcfu-est3 , arcfu-estea , arcfu-o28594 , arcfu-o29442 , arcfu-pcbd

Title : Genomic sequence of a Lyme disease spirochaete, Borrelia burgdorferi - Fraser_1997_Nature_390_580
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Casjens S , Huang WM , Sutton GG , Clayton R , Lathigra R , White O , Ketchum KA , Dodson R , Hickey EK , Gwinn M , Dougherty B , Tomb JF , Fleischmann RD , Richardson D , Peterson J , Kerlavage AR , Quackenbush J , Salzberg S , Hanson M , van Vugt R , Palmer N , Adams MD , Gocayne J , Weidman J , Utterback T , Watthey L , McDonald L , Artiach P , Bowman C , Garland S , Fujii C , Cotton MD , Horst K , Roberts K , Hatch B , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 390 :580 , 1997
Abstract : The genome of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi B31, the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease, contains a linear chromosome of 910,725 base pairs and at least 17 linear and circular plasmids with a combined size of more than 533,000 base pairs. The chromosome contains 853 genes encoding a basic set of proteins for DNA replication, transcription, translation, solute transport and energy metabolism, but, like Mycoplasma genitalium, it contains no genes for cellular biosynthetic reactions. Because B. burgdorferi and M. genitalium are distantly related eubacteria, we suggest that their limited metabolic capacities reflect convergent evolution by gene loss from more metabolically competent progenitors. Of 430 genes on 11 plasmids, most have no known biological function; 39% of plasmid genes are paralogues that form 47 gene families. The biological significance of the multiple plasmid-encoded genes is not clear, although they may be involved in antigenic variation or immune evasion.
ESTHER : Fraser_1997_Nature_390_580
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1997_Nature_390_580
PubMedID: 9403685
Gene_locus related to this paper: borbu-BB0646