Kolonay JF

References (18)

Title : Insights on evolution of virulence and resistance from the complete genome analysis of an early methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and a biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strain - Gill_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_2426
Author(s) : Gill SR , Fouts DE , Archer GL , Mongodin EF , DeBoy RT , Ravel J , Paulsen IT , Kolonay JF , Brinkac L , Beanan M , Dodson RJ , Daugherty SC , Madupu R , Angiuoli SV , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Vamathevan J , Khouri H , Utterback T , Lee C , Dimitrov G , Jiang L , Qin H , Weidman J , Tran K , Kang K , Hance IR , Nelson KE , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 187 :2426 , 2005
Abstract : Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the major causative agent of numerous hospital- and community-acquired infections. Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a causative agent of infections often associated with implanted medical devices. We have sequenced the approximately 2.8-Mb genome of S. aureus COL, an early methicillin-resistant isolate, and the approximately 2.6-Mb genome of S. epidermidis RP62a, a methicillin-resistant biofilm isolate. Comparative analysis of these and other staphylococcal genomes was used to explore the evolution of virulence and resistance between these two species. The S. aureus and S. epidermidis genomes are syntenic throughout their lengths and share a core set of 1,681 open reading frames. Genome islands in nonsyntenic regions are the primary source of variations in pathogenicity and resistance. Gene transfer between staphylococci and low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria appears to have shaped their virulence and resistance profiles. Integrated plasmids in S. epidermidis carry genes encoding resistance to cadmium and species-specific LPXTG surface proteins. A novel genome island encodes multiple phenol-soluble modulins, a potential S. epidermidis virulence factor. S. epidermidis contains the cap operon, encoding the polyglutamate capsule, a major virulence factor in Bacillus anthracis. Additional phenotypic differences are likely the result of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which are most numerous in cell envelope proteins. Overall differences in pathogenicity can be attributed to genome islands in S. aureus which encode enterotoxins, exotoxins, leukocidins, and leukotoxins not found in S. epidermidis.
ESTHER : Gill_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_2426
PubMedSearch : Gill_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_2426
PubMedID: 15774886
Gene_locus related to this paper: staau-LIP , staau-lipas , staau-MW0741 , staau-MW2456 , staau-q6gfm6 , staau-SA0011 , staau-SA0569 , staau-SA0572 , staau-SA0897 , staau-SA1143 , staau-SA2240 , staau-SA2306 , staau-SA2367 , staau-SA2422 , staau-SAV0321 , staau-SAV0446 , staau-SAV0457 , staau-SAV0655 , staau-SAV1014 , staau-SAV1765 , staau-SAV1793 , staau-SAV2188 , staau-SAV2350 , staau-SAV2484 , staau-SAV2594 , staep-lipas , staep-SE0011 , staep-SE0226 , staep-SE0386 , staep-SE0389 , staep-SE0424 , staep-SE0564 , staep-SE0714 , staep-SE0745 , staep-SE0980 , staep-SE1436 , staep-SE1460 , staep-SE1510 , staep-SE1780 , staep-SE1929 , staep-SERP2035 , staep-SE2050 , staep-SE2095 , staep-SE2213 , staep-SE2328

Title : The psychrophilic lifestyle as revealed by the genome sequence of Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H through genomic and proteomic analyses - Methe_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_10913
Author(s) : Methe BA , Nelson KE , Deming JW , Momen B , Melamud E , Zhang X , Moult J , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , DeBoy RT , Kolonay JF , Sullivan SA , Zhou L , Davidsen TM , Wu M , Huston AL , Lewis M , Weaver B , Weidman JF , Khouri H , Utterback TR , Feldblyum TV , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 102 :10913 , 2005
Abstract : The completion of the 5,373,180-bp genome sequence of the marine psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a model for the study of life in permanently cold environments, reveals capabilities important to carbon and nutrient cycling, bioremediation, production of secondary metabolites, and cold-adapted enzymes. From a genomic perspective, cold adaptation is suggested in several broad categories involving changes to the cell membrane fluidity, uptake and synthesis of compounds conferring cryotolerance, and strategies to overcome temperature-dependent barriers to carbon uptake. Modeling of three-dimensional protein homology from bacteria representing a range of optimal growth temperatures suggests changes to proteome composition that may enhance enzyme effectiveness at low temperatures. Comparative genome analyses suggest that the psychrophilic lifestyle is most likely conferred not by a unique set of genes but by a collection of synergistic changes in overall genome content and amino acid composition.
ESTHER : Methe_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_10913
PubMedSearch : Methe_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_10913
PubMedID: 16043709
Gene_locus related to this paper: colp3-q47uc4 , colp3-q47uc7 , colp3-q47ut6 , colp3-q47ut7 , colp3-q47v81 , colp3-q47vk3 , colp3-q47vy9 , colp3-q47w94 , colp3-q47wj4 , colp3-q47wr2 , colp3-q47ws7 , colp3-q47ws9 , colp3-q47x08 , colp3-q47x48 , colp3-q47yd5 , colp3-q47ye2 , colp3-q47yq1 , colp3-q47yv1 , colp3-q47za7 , colp3-q47zp5 , colp3-q48ac9 , colp3-q48aj8 , colp3-q48aq9 , colp3-q480e1 , colp3-q481z4 , colp3-q482y8 , colp3-q484d8 , colp3-q484k3 , colp3-q485e4 , colp3-q485t4 , colp3-q486t5 , colp3-q487b7 , colp3-q487s5 , colp3-q488a3 , colp3-q488d2 , colp3-q488d8 , colp3-q488e7 , colp3-q488f8 , colp3-q488p2 , colp3-q489b1 , colp3-q489i6 , colp3-q47ya3

Title : Genome sequence of the PCE-dechlorinating bacterium Dehalococcoides ethenogenes - Seshadri_2005_Science_307_105
Author(s) : Seshadri R , Adrian L , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Phillippy AM , Methe BA , Ward NL , Nelson WC , DeBoy RT , Khouri HM , Kolonay JF , Dodson RJ , Daugherty SC , Brinkac LM , Sullivan SA , Madupu R , Nelson KE , Kang KH , Impraim M , Tran K , Robinson JM , Forberger HA , Fraser CM , Zinder SH , Heidelberg JF
Ref : Science , 307 :105 , 2005
Abstract : Dehalococcoides ethenogenes is the only bacterium known to reductively dechlorinate the groundwater pollutants, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene, to ethene. Its 1,469,720-base pair chromosome contains large dynamic duplicated regions and integrated elements. Genes encoding 17 putative reductive dehalogenases, nearly all of which were adjacent to genes for transcription regulators, and five hydrogenase complexes were identified. These findings, plus a limited repertoire of other metabolic modes, indicate that D. ethenogenes is highly evolved to utilize halogenated organic compounds and H2. Diversification of reductive dehalogenase functions appears to have been mediated by recent genetic exchange and amplification. Genome analysis provides insights into the organism's complex nutrient requirements and suggests that an ancestor was a nitrogen-fixing autotroph.
ESTHER : Seshadri_2005_Science_307_105
PubMedSearch : Seshadri_2005_Science_307_105
PubMedID: 15637277
Gene_locus related to this paper: dehm1-q3z6q3 , dehm1-q3z6x9 , dehm1-q3z6z2 , dehm1-q3z8f3 , dehm1-q3za50

Title : Life in hot carbon monoxide: the complete genome sequence of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901 - Wu_2005_PLoS.Genet_1_e65
Author(s) : Wu M , Ren Q , Durkin AS , Daugherty SC , Brinkac LM , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Sullivan SA , Kolonay JF , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Tallon LJ , Jones KM , Ulrich LE , Gonzalez JM , Zhulin IB , Robb FT , Eisen JA
Ref : PLoS Genet , 1 :e65 , 2005
Abstract : We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901. This species is a model for studies of hydrogenogens, which are diverse bacteria and archaea that grow anaerobically utilizing carbon monoxide (CO) as their sole carbon source and water as an electron acceptor, producing carbon dioxide and hydrogen as waste products. Organisms that make use of CO do so through carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes. Remarkably, analysis of the genome of C. hydrogenoformans reveals the presence of at least five highly differentiated anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes, which may in part explain how this species is able to grow so much more rapidly on CO than many other species. Analysis of the genome also has provided many general insights into the metabolism of this organism which should make it easier to use it as a source of biologically produced hydrogen gas. One surprising finding is the presence of many genes previously found only in sporulating species in the Firmicutes Phylum. Although this species is also a Firmicutes, it was not known to sporulate previously. Here we show that it does sporulate and because it is missing many of the genes involved in sporulation in other species, this organism may serve as a "minimal" model for sporulation studies. In addition, using phylogenetic profile analysis, we have identified many uncharacterized gene families found in all known sporulating Firmicutes, but not in any non-sporulating bacteria, including a sigma factor not known to be involved in sporulation previously.
ESTHER : Wu_2005_PLoS.Genet_1_e65
PubMedSearch : Wu_2005_PLoS.Genet_1_e65
PubMedID: 16311624
Gene_locus related to this paper: carhz-metx , carhz-q3abd5 , carhz-q3adp4

Title : The genome sequence of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough - Heidelberg_2004_Nat.Biotechnol_22_554
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Seshadri R , Haveman SA , Hemme CL , Paulsen IT , Kolonay JF , Eisen JA , Ward N , Methe B , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Sullivan SA , Fouts D , Haft DH , Selengut J , Peterson JD , Davidsen TM , Zafar N , Zhou L , Radune D , Dimitrov G , Hance M , Tran K , Khouri H , Gill J , Utterback TR , Feldblyum TV , Wall JD , Voordouw G , Fraser CM
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 22 :554 , 2004
Abstract : Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a model organism for studying the energy metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and for understanding the economic impacts of SRB, including biocorrosion of metal infrastructure and bioremediation of toxic metal ions. The 3,570,858 base pair (bp) genome sequence reveals a network of novel c-type cytochromes, connecting multiple periplasmic hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases, as a key feature of its energy metabolism. The relative arrangement of genes encoding enzymes for energy transduction, together with inferred cellular location of the enzymes, provides a basis for proposing an expansion to the 'hydrogen-cycling' model for increasing energy efficiency in this bacterium. Plasmid-encoded functions include modification of cell surface components, nitrogen fixation and a type-III protein secretion system. This genome sequence represents a substantial step toward the elucidation of pathways for reduction (and bioremediation) of pollutants such as uranium and chromium and offers a new starting point for defining this organism's complex anaerobic respiration.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2004_Nat.Biotechnol_22_554
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2004_Nat.Biotechnol_22_554
PubMedID: 15077118
Gene_locus related to this paper: desvh-q72b36 , desvh-q72ed6 , desvh-q728i3 , desvh-q729w4 , desvh-q72b15

Title : Whole genome comparisons of serotype 4b and 1\/2a strains of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes reveal new insights into the core genome components of this species - Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fouts DE , Mongodin EF , Ravel J , DeBoy RT , Kolonay JF , Rasko DA , Angiuoli SV , Gill SR , Paulsen IT , Peterson J , White O , Nelson WC , Nierman W , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Haft DH , Selengut J , Van Aken S , Khouri H , Fedorova N , Forberger H , Tran B , Kathariou S , Wonderling LD , Uhlich GA , Bayles DO , Luchansky JB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 32 :2386 , 2004
Abstract : The genomes of three strains of Listeria monocytogenes that have been associated with food-borne illness in the USA were subjected to whole genome comparative analysis. A total of 51, 97 and 69 strain-specific genes were identified in L.monocytogenes strains F2365 (serotype 4b, cheese isolate), F6854 (serotype 1/2a, frankfurter isolate) and H7858 (serotype 4b, meat isolate), respectively. Eighty-three genes were restricted to serotype 1/2a and 51 to serotype 4b strains. These strain- and serotype-specific genes probably contribute to observed differences in pathogenicity, and the ability of the organisms to survive and grow in their respective environmental niches. The serotype 1/2a-specific genes include an operon that encodes the rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that is associated with teichoic acid biosynthesis, as well as operons for five glycosyl transferases and an adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase. A total of 8603 and 105 050 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the draft genome sequences of strain H7858 and strain F6854, respectively, when compared with strain F2365. Whole genome comparative analyses revealed that the L.monocytogenes genomes are essentially syntenic, with the majority of genomic differences consisting of phage insertions, transposable elements and SNPs.
ESTHER : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedID: 15115801
Gene_locus related to this paper: lismc-c1l0d9 , lismf-q71xq4 , lismo-LMO0110 , lismo-LMO0493 , lismo-LMO0580 , lismo-LMO0752 , lismo-LMO0760 , lismo-LMO0857 , lismo-LMO0950 , lismo-LMO0951 , lismo-LMO0977 , lismo-LMO1128 , lismo-LMO1258 , lismo-LMO1674 , lismo-LMO2089 , lismo-LMO2109 , lismo-LMO2433 , lismo-LMO2450 , lismo-LMO2452 , lismo-LMO2453 , lismo-LMO2578 , lismo-LMO2677 , lismo-LMO2755 , lismo-metx

Title : Phylogenomics of the reproductive parasite Wolbachia pipientis wMel: a streamlined genome overrun by mobile genetic elements - Wu_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_E69
Author(s) : Wu M , Sun LV , Vamathevan J , Riegler M , Deboy R , Brownlie JC , McGraw EA , Martin W , Esser C , Ahmadinejad N , Wiegand C , Madupu R , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Mohamoud Y , Lee P , Berry K , Young MB , Utterback T , Weidman J , Nierman WC , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , O'Neill SL , Eisen JA
Ref : PLoS Biol , 2 :E69 , 2004
Abstract : The complete sequence of the 1,267,782 bp genome of Wolbachia pipientis wMel, an obligate intracellular bacteria of Drosophila melanogaster, has been determined. Wolbachia, which are found in a variety of invertebrate species, are of great interest due to their diverse interactions with different hosts, which range from many forms of reproductive parasitism to mutualistic symbioses. Analysis of the wMel genome, in particular phylogenomic comparisons with other intracellular bacteria, has revealed many insights into the biology and evolution of wMel and Wolbachia in general. For example, the wMel genome is unique among sequenced obligate intracellular species in both being highly streamlined and containing very high levels of repetitive DNA and mobile DNA elements. This observation, coupled with multiple evolutionary reconstructions, suggests that natural selection is somewhat inefficient in wMel, most likely owing to the occurrence of repeated population bottlenecks. Genome analysis predicts many metabolic differences with the closely related Rickettsia species, including the presence of intact glycolysis and purine synthesis, which may compensate for an inability to obtain ATP directly from its host, as Rickettsia can. Other discoveries include the apparent inability of wMel to synthesize lipopolysaccharide and the presence of the most genes encoding proteins with ankyrin repeat domains of any prokaryotic genome yet sequenced. Despite the ability of wMel to infect the germline of its host, we find no evidence for either recent lateral gene transfer between wMel and D. melanogaster or older transfers between Wolbachia and any host. Evolutionary analysis further supports the hypothesis that mitochondria share a common ancestor with the alpha-Proteobacteria, but shows little support for the grouping of mitochondria with species in the order Rickettsiales. With the availability of the complete genomes of both species and excellent genetic tools for the host, the wMel-D. melanogaster symbiosis is now an ideal system for studying the biology and evolution of Wolbachia infections.
ESTHER : Wu_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_E69
PubMedSearch : Wu_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_E69
PubMedID: 15024419
Gene_locus related to this paper: wolpm-q73gf0 , wolpm-q73gx7

Title : Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome - Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
Author(s) : Nierman WC , DeShazer D , Kim HS , Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Feldblyum T , Ulrich RL , Ronning CM , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Davidsen TD , DeBoy RT , Dimitrov G , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Khouri H , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Mohammoud Y , Nelson WC , Radune D , Romero CM , Sarria S , Selengut J , Shamblin C , Sullivan SA , White O , Yu Y , Zafar N , Zhou L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :14246 , 2004
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression profiling of the bacterium in hamster liver in vivo. The genome contains numerous insertion sequence elements that have mediated extensive deletions and rearrangements of the genome relative to Burkholderia pseudomallei. The genome also contains a vast number (>12,000) of simple sequence repeats. Variation in simple sequence repeats in key genes can provide a mechanism for generating antigenic variation that may account for the mammalian host's inability to mount a durable adaptive immune response to a B. mallei infection.
ESTHER : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedID: 15377793
Gene_locus related to this paper: burma-a5j5w8 , burma-a5tj72 , burma-a5tq93 , burma-metx , burma-q62a61 , burma-q62ar2.1 , burma-q62ar2.2 , burma-q62ax8 , burma-q62b60 , burma-q62b79 , burma-q62bh9 , burma-q62bl4 , burma-q62bl7 , burma-q62c00 , burma-q62cg5 , burma-q62d41 , burma-q62d56 , burma-q62d83 , burma-q62dg2 , burma-q62du7 , burma-q62e67 , burma-q62eb8 , burma-q62ed8 , burma-q62f28 , burma-q62fx7 , burma-q62g26 , burma-q62gx9 , burma-q62gy2 , burma-q62hq2 , burma-q62i62 , burma-q62ib8 , burma-q62ie8 , burma-q62j07 , burma-q62j15 , burma-q62jn5 , burma-q62jy7 , burma-q62kb7 , burma-q62kg0 , burma-q62kh9 , burma-q62lp7 , burma-q62m40 , burma-q62mc3 , burma-q62mf4 , burma-q62mq7 , burma-q629m1 , burma-q629p4 , burma-q629u0 , burps-q3v7s4 , burps-hboh

Title : The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames and comparison to closely related bacteria - Read_2003_Nature_423_81
Author(s) : Read TD , Peterson SN , Tourasse N , Baillie LW , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Gill SR , Holtzapple EK , Okstad OA , Helgason E , Rilstone J , Wu M , Kolonay JF , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Gwinn M , DeBoy RT , Madpu R , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Pop M , Khouri HM , Radune D , Benton JL , Mahamoud Y , Jiang L , Hance IR , Weidman JF , Berry KJ , Plaut RD , Wolf AM , Watkins KL , Nierman WC , Hazen A , Cline R , Redmond C , Thwaite JE , White O , Salzberg SL , Thomason B , Friedlander AM , Koehler TM , Hanna PC , Kolsto AB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 423 :81 , 2003
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis is an endospore-forming bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax. Key virulence genes are found on plasmids (extra-chromosomal, circular, double-stranded DNA molecules) pXO1 (ref. 2) and pXO2 (ref. 3). To identify additional genes that might contribute to virulence, we analysed the complete sequence of the chromosome of B. anthracis Ames (about 5.23 megabases). We found several chromosomally encoded proteins that may contribute to pathogenicity--including haemolysins, phospholipases and iron acquisition functions--and identified numerous surface proteins that might be important targets for vaccines and drugs. Almost all these putative chromosomal virulence and surface proteins have homologues in Bacillus cereus, highlighting the similarity of B. anthracis to near-neighbours that are not associated with anthrax. By performing a comparative genome hybridization of 19 B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains against a B. anthracis DNA microarray, we confirmed the general similarity of chromosomal genes among this group of close relatives. However, we found that the gene sequences of pXO1 and pXO2 were more variable between strains, suggesting plasmid mobility in the group. The complete sequence of B. anthracis is a step towards a better understanding of anthrax pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedID: 12721629
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0160 , bacan-BA0950 , bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA1747 , bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA1914 , bacan-BA2015 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2417 , bacan-BA2557 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA2687 , bacan-BA2694 , bacan-BA2738 , bacan-BA2865 , bacan-BA3068 , bacan-BA3165 , bacan-BA3178 , bacan-BA3187 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3372 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA3887 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4328 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA4983 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacan-q81tt2 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx

Title : The complete genome sequence of the Arabidopsis and tomato pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 - Buell_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_10181
Author(s) : Buell CR , Joardar V , Lindeberg M , Selengut J , Paulsen IT , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Daugherty S , Brinkac L , Beanan MJ , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Davidsen T , Zafar N , Zhou L , Liu J , Yuan Q , Khouri H , Fedorova N , Tran B , Russell D , Berry K , Utterback T , Van Aken SE , Feldblyum TV , D'Ascenzo M , Deng WL , Ramos AR , Alfano JR , Cartinhour S , Chatterjee AK , Delaney TP , Lazarowitz SG , Martin GB , Schneider DJ , Tang X , Bender CL , White O , Fraser CM , Collmer A
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 100 :10181 , 2003
Abstract : We report the complete genome sequence of the model bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 (DC3000), which is pathogenic on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. The DC3000 genome (6.5 megabases) contains a circular chromosome and two plasmids, which collectively encode 5,763 ORFs. We identified 298 established and putative virulence genes, including several clusters of genes encoding 31 confirmed and 19 predicted type III secretion system effector proteins. Many of the virulence genes were members of paralogous families and also were proximal to mobile elements, which collectively comprise 7% of the DC3000 genome. The bacterium possesses a large repertoire of transporters for the acquisition of nutrients, particularly sugars, as well as genes implicated in attachment to plant surfaces. Over 12% of the genes are dedicated to regulation, which may reflect the need for rapid adaptation to the diverse environments encountered during epiphytic growth and pathogenesis. Comparative analyses confirmed a high degree of similarity with two sequenced pseudomonads, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, yet revealed 1,159 genes unique to DC3000, of which 811 lack a known function.
ESTHER : Buell_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_10181
PubMedSearch : Buell_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_10181
PubMedID: 12928499
Gene_locus related to this paper: pse14-q48ia0 , psesm-IRP1 , psesm-METX , psesm-q87y20 , psesm-q88a39 , psesm-q881b4 , psesm-q889k3 , psesy-BIOH , psesy-CFA7 , psesy-CFA9 , psesy-CMAT , psesy-ESTA , psesy-IRP4 , psesy-PHAB , psesy-PHAC , psesy-PHAG1 , psesy-PHAG2 , psesy-PIP , psesy-PSPTO0162 , psesy-PSPTO0421 , psesy-PSPTO0508 , psesy-PSPTO0675 , psesy-PSPTO0715 , psesy-PSPTO1154 , psesy-PSPTO1504 , psesy-PSPTO1559 , psesy-PSPTO1580 , psesy-PSPTO1604 , psesy-PSPTO1677 , psesy-PSPTO1766 , psesy-PSPTO1863 , psesy-PSPTO2042 , psesy-PSPTO2134 , psesy-PSPTO2150 , psesy-PSPTO2209 , psesy-PSPTO2217 , psesy-PSPTO2218 , psesy-PSPTO2293 , psesy-PSPTO2495 , psesy-PSPTO2674 , psesy-PSPTO2830 , psesy-PSPTO3135 , psesy-PSPTO3138 , psesy-PSPTO3264 , psesy-PSPTO3282 , psesy-PSPTO3306 , psesy-PSPTO3485 , psesy-PSPTO3572 , psesy-PSPTO3911 , psesy-PSPTO4089 , psesy-PSPTO4178 , psesy-PSPTO4277 , psesy-PSPTO4430 , psesy-PSPTO4519 , psesy-PSPTO4540 , psesy-PSPTO4699 , psesy-PSPTO4708 , psesy-PSPTO4781 , psesy-PSPTO4843 , psesy-PSPTO4964 , psesy-PSPTO5218 , psesy-PSPTO5299 , psesy-PSPTO5448 , psesy-PSPTO5537 , psesy-SYLD , psesy-SYPC , psesy-SYRE , psesm-q87v84

Title : Genome of Geobacter sulfurreducens: metal reduction in subsurface environments - Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
Author(s) : Methe BA , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Paulsen IT , Nelson W , Heidelberg JF , Wu D , Wu M , Ward N , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Sullivan SA , Haft DH , Selengut J , Davidsen TM , Zafar N , White O , Tran B , Romero C , Forberger HA , Weidman J , Khouri H , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Van Aken SE , Lovley DR , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 302 :1967 , 2003
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a delta-proteobacterium, reveals unsuspected capabilities, including evidence of aerobic metabolism, one-carbon and complex carbon metabolism, motility, and chemotactic behavior. These characteristics, coupled with the possession of many two-component sensors and many c-type cytochromes, reveal an ability to create alternative, redundant, electron transport networks and offer insights into the process of metal ion reduction in subsurface environments. As well as playing roles in the global cycling of metals and carbon, this organism clearly has the potential for use in bioremediation of radioactive metals and in the generation of electricity.
ESTHER : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedSearch : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedID: 14671304
Gene_locus related to this paper: geosl-q74a54 , geosl-q74ac8 , geosl-q74eb1 , geosl-q747u4 , geosl-q747v8 , geosl-q749w4

Title : Complete genome sequence of the oral pathogenic Bacterium porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83 - Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fleischmann RD , DeBoy RT , Paulsen IT , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Mason T , Tallon L , Gray J , Granger D , Tettelin H , Dong H , Galvin JL , Duncan MJ , Dewhirst FE , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 185 :5591 , 2003
Abstract : The complete 2,343,479-bp genome sequence of the gram-negative, pathogenic oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83, a major contributor to periodontal disease, was determined. Whole-genome comparative analysis with other available complete genome sequences confirms the close relationship between the Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (CFB) phylum and the green-sulfur bacteria. Within the CFB phyla, the genomes most similar to that of P. gingivalis are those of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and B. fragilis. Outside of the CFB phyla the most similar genome to P. gingivalis is that of Chlorobium tepidum, supporting the previous phylogenetic studies that indicated that the Chlorobia and CFB phyla are related, albeit distantly. Genome analysis of strain W83 reveals a range of pathways and virulence determinants that relate to the novel biology of this oral pathogen. Among these determinants are at least six putative hemagglutinin-like genes and 36 previously unidentified peptidases. Genome analysis also reveals that P. gingivalis can metabolize a range of amino acids and generate a number of metabolic end products that are toxic to the human host or human gingival tissue and contribute to the development of periodontal disease.
ESTHER : Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2003_J.Bacteriol_185_5591
PubMedID: 12949112
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9gamm-q4a538 , porgi-DPP , porgi-q7mtk3 , porgi-q7mu18 , porgi-q7mub3 , porgi-q7muw6 , porgi-q7mvp4 , porgi-q7mwa7 , porgi-q7mx03

Title : The Brucella suis genome reveals fundamental similarities between animal and plant pathogens and symbionts - Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
Author(s) : Paulsen IT , Seshadri R , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Read TD , Dodson RJ , Umayam L , Brinkac LM , Beanan MJ , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Ayodeji B , Kraul M , Shetty J , Malek J , Van Aken SE , Riedmuller S , Tettelin H , Gill SR , White O , Salzberg SL , Hoover DL , Lindler LE , Halling SM , Boyle SM , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :13148 , 2002
Abstract : The 3.31-Mb genome sequence of the intracellular pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent, Brucella suis, was determined. Comparison of B. suis with Brucella melitensis has defined a finite set of differences that could be responsible for the differences in virulence and host preference between these organisms, and indicates that phage have played a significant role in their divergence. Analysis of the B. suis genome reveals transport and metabolic capabilities akin to soil/plant-associated bacteria. Extensive gene synteny between B. suis chromosome 1 and the genome of the plant symbiont Mesorhizobium loti emphasizes the similarity between this animal pathogen and plant pathogens and symbionts. A limited repertoire of genes homologous to known bacterial virulence factors were identified.
ESTHER : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedSearch : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedID: 12271122
Gene_locus related to this paper: brume-BMEI0552 , brume-BMEI0733 , brume-BMEI1044 , brume-BMEI1119 , brume-BMEI1365 , brume-BMEI1594 , brume-BMEI1608 , brume-BMEI1822 , brume-BMEI1884 , brume-BMEI1951 , brume-BMEI2011 , brume-BMEII0047 , brume-BMEII0681 , brume-BMEII0989 , brume-PCAD , brusu-BR0288 , brusu-BR1291 , brusu-BR1327 , brusu-BRA0989

Title : Whole-genome comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical and laboratory strains - Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
Author(s) : Fleischmann RD , Alland D , Eisen JA , Carpenter L , White O , Peterson J , Deboy R , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Haft D , Hickey E , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Umayam LA , Ermolaeva M , Salzberg SL , Delcher A , Utterback T , Weidman J , Khouri H , Gill J , Mikula A , Bishai W , Jacobs Jr WR, Jr. , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 184 :5479 , 2002
Abstract : Virulence and immunity are poorly understood in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We sequenced the complete genome of the M. tuberculosis clinical strain CDC1551 and performed a whole-genome comparison with the laboratory strain H37Rv in order to identify polymorphic sequences with potential relevance to disease pathogenesis, immunity, and evolution. We found large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in numerous genes. Polymorphic loci included a phospholipase C, a membrane lipoprotein, members of an adenylate cyclase gene family, and members of the PE/PPE gene family, some of which have been implicated in virulence or the host immune response. Several gene families, including the PE/PPE gene family, also had significantly higher synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution frequencies compared to the genome as a whole. We tested a large sample of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates for a subset of the large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and found widespread genetic variability at many of these loci. We performed phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis to investigate the evolutionary relationships among isolates and the origins of specific polymorphic loci. A number of these polymorphisms appear to have occurred multiple times as independent events, suggesting that these changes may be under selective pressure. Together, these results demonstrate that polymorphisms among M. tuberculosis strains are more extensive than initially anticipated, and genetic variation may have an important role in disease pathogenesis and immunity.
ESTHER : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedSearch : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedID: 12218036
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Genome sequence of the dissimilatory metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis - Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Gaidos EJ , Nelson WC , Read TD , Eisen JA , Seshadri R , Ward N , Methe B , Clayton RA , Meyer T , Tsapin A , Scott J , Beanan M , Brinkac L , Daugherty S , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Wolf AM , Vamathevan J , Weidman J , Impraim M , Lee K , Berry K , Lee C , Mueller J , Khouri H , Gill J , Utterback TR , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Smith HO , Venter JC , Nealson KH , Fraser CM
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 20 :1118 , 2002
Abstract : Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities, conferred in part by multicomponent, branched electron transport systems. Here we report the sequencing of the S. oneidensis genome, which consists of a 4,969,803-base pair circular chromosome with 4,758 predicted protein-encoding open reading frames (CDS) and a 161,613-base pair plasmid with 173 CDSs. We identified the first Shewanella lambda-like phage, providing a potential tool for further genome engineering. Genome analysis revealed 39 c-type cytochromes, including 32 previously unidentified in S. oneidensis, and a novel periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase, which are integral members of the electron transport system. This genome sequence represents a critical step in the elucidation of the pathways for reduction (and bioremediation) of pollutants such as uranium (U) and chromium (Cr), and offers a starting point for defining this organism's complex electron transport systems and metal ion-reducing capabilities.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedID: 12368813
Gene_locus related to this paper: sheon-BIOH , sheon-LYPA , sheon-PIP , sheon-PTRB , sheon-q8ej95 , sheon-SO0071 , sheon-SO0614 , sheon-SO0616 , sheon-SO0801 , sheon-SO0880 , sheoe-SO0967 , sheon-SO1006 , sheon-SO1224 , sheon-SO1310 , sheon-SO1534 , sheon-SO1539 , sheon-SO1686 , sheon-SO1743 , sheon-SO1976 , sheon-SO1999 , sheon-SO2024 , sheon-SO2047 , sheon-SO2055 , sheon-SO2223 , sheon-SO2333 , sheon-SO2473 , sheon-SO2582 , sheon-SO2753 , sheon-SO2934 , sheon-SO3025 , sheon-SO3900 , sheon-SO3990 , sheon-SO4252 , sheon-SO4400 , sheon-SO4537 , sheon-SO4543 , sheon-SO4574 , sheon-SO4618 , sheon-SO4650 , sheon-SOA0048 , shefn-SfSFGH , sheon-ym51

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae - Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Masignani V , Cieslewicz MJ , Eisen JA , Peterson S , Wessels MR , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Margarit I , Read TD , Madoff LC , Wolf AM , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Lewis MR , Radune D , Fedorova NB , Scanlan D , Khouri H , Mulligan S , Carty HA , Cline RT , Van Aken SE , Gill J , Scarselli M , Mora M , Iacobini ET , Brettoni C , Galli G , Mariani M , Vegni F , Maione D , Rinaudo D , Rappuoli R , Telford JL , Kasper DL , Grandi G , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :12391 , 2002
Abstract : The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the other completely sequenced genomes identified genes specific to the streptococci and to S. agalactiae. These in silico analyses, combined with comparative genome hybridization experiments between the sequenced serotype V strain 2603 V/R and 19 S. agalactiae strains from several serotypes using whole-genome microarrays, revealed the genetic heterogeneity among S. agalactiae strains, even of the same serotype, and provided insights into the evolution of virulence mechanisms.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_12391
PubMedID: 12200547
Gene_locus related to this paper: strag-ESTA , strag-GBS0040 , strag-GBS1828 , strag-pepx , strag-SAG0108 , strag-SAG0246 , strag-SAG0383 , strag-SAG0521 , strag-SAG0679 , strag-SAG0680 , strag-SAG0681 , strag-SAG0785 , strag-SAG0912 , strag-SAG1040 , strag-SAG1562 , strag-SAG2132

Title : Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus - Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Feldblyum TV , Laub MT , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Alley MR , Ohta N , Maddock JR , Potocka I , Nelson WC , Newton A , Stephens C , Phadke ND , Ely B , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Smit J , Craven MB , Khouri H , Shetty J , Berry K , Utterback T , Tran K , Wolf A , Vamathevan J , Ermolaeva M , White O , Salzberg SL , Venter JC , Shapiro L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 98 :4136 , 2001
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus was determined to be 4,016,942 base pairs in a single circular chromosome encoding 3,767 genes. This organism, which grows in a dilute aquatic environment, coordinates the cell division cycle and multiple cell differentiation events. With the annotated genome sequence, a full description of the genetic network that controls bacterial differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle progression is within reach. Two-component signal transduction proteins are known to play a significant role in cell cycle progression. Genome analysis revealed that the C. crescentus genome encodes a significantly higher number of these signaling proteins (105) than any bacterial genome sequenced thus far. Another regulatory mechanism involved in cell cycle progression is DNA methylation. The occurrence of the recognition sequence for an essential DNA methylating enzyme that is required for cell cycle regulation is severely limited and shows a bias to intergenic regions. The genome contains multiple clusters of genes encoding proteins essential for survival in a nutrient poor habitat. Included are those involved in chemotaxis, outer membrane channel function, degradation of aromatic ring compounds, and the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources, in addition to many extracytoplasmic function sigma factors, providing the organism with the ability to respond to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. C. crescentus is, to our knowledge, the first free-living alpha-class proteobacterium to be sequenced and will serve as a foundation for exploring the biology of this group of bacteria, which includes the obligate endosymbiont and human pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the bovine and human pathogen Brucella abortus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedID: 11259647
Gene_locus related to this paper: caucr-CC0087 , caucr-CC0223 , caucr-CC0341 , caucr-CC0352 , caucr-CC0355 , caucr-CC0384 , caucr-CC0477 , caucr-CC0478 , caucr-CC0525 , caucr-CC0552 , caucr-CC0771 , caucr-CC0799 , caucr-CC0847 , caucr-CC0936 , caucr-CC0940 , caucr-CC1048 , caucr-CC1053 , caucr-CC1175 , caucr-CC1226 , caucr-CC1227 , caucr-CC1229 , caucr-CC1499 , caucr-CC1622 , caucr-CC1734 , caucr-CC1867 , caucr-CC1986 , caucr-CC2083 , caucr-CC2154 , caucr-CC2185 , caucr-CC2230 , caucr-CC2253 , caucr-CC2298 , caucr-CC2313 , caucr-CC2358 , caucr-CC2395 , caucr-CC2411 , caucr-CC2515 , caucr-CC2565 , caucr-CC2671 , caucr-CC2710 , caucr-CC2763 , caucr-CC2797 , caucr-CC3039 , caucr-CC3091 , caucr-CC3099 , caucr-CC3204 , caucr-CC3246 , caucr-CC3300 , caucr-CC3308 , caucr-CC3346 , caucr-CC3418 , caucr-CC3441 , caucr-CC3442 , caucr-CC3634 , caucr-CC3687 , caucr-CC3688 , caucr-CC3723 , caucr-CC3725 , caucr-CC3758 , caucr-PHAZ , caucr-PHBC , caucr-q9a8c1 , caucr-q9aac8

Title : Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae - Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Read TD , Peterson S , Heidelberg J , DeBoy RT , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Salzberg SL , Lewis MR , Radune D , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Wolf AM , Utterback TR , Hansen CL , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Angiuoli S , Dickinson T , Hickey EK , Holt IE , Loftus BJ , Yang F , Smith HO , Venter JC , Dougherty BA , Morrison DA , Hollingshead SK , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 293 :498 , 2001
Abstract : The 2,160,837-base pair genome sequence of an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and otitis media, contains 2236 predicted coding regions; of these, 1440 (64%) were assigned a biological role. Approximately 5% of the genome is composed of insertion sequences that may contribute to genome rearrangements through uptake of foreign DNA. Extracellular enzyme systems for the metabolism of polysaccharides and hexosamines provide a substantial source of carbon and nitrogen for S. pneumoniae and also damage host tissues and facilitate colonization. A motif identified within the signal peptide of proteins is potentially involved in targeting these proteins to the cell surface of low-guanine/cytosine (GC) Gram-positive species. Several surface-exposed proteins that may serve as potential vaccine candidates were identified. Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedID: 11463916
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpj-b8zns7 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-b2dz20 , strpn-pepx , strpn-SP0614 , strpn-SP0666 , strpn-SP0777 , strpn-SP0902 , strpn-SP1343