Puri V

References (8)

Title : Human CIDEC transgene improves lipid metabolism and protects against high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance in mice - Gupta_2022_J.Biol.Chem__
Author(s) : Gupta A , Balakrishnan B , Karki S , Slayton M , Jash S , Banerjee S , Grahn THM , Jambunathan S , Disney S , Hussein H , Kong D , Lowell BB , Natarajan P , Reddy UK , Gokce N , Sharma VM , Puri V
Ref : Journal of Biological Chemistry , :102347 , 2022
Abstract : Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-like effector C (CIDEC) expression in adipose tissue positively correlates with insulin sensitivity in obese humans. Further, E186X, a single-nucleotide CIDEC variant is associated with lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistance. To establish the unknown mechanistic link between CIDEC and maintenance of systemic glucose homeostasis, we generated transgenic mouse models expressing CIDEC (Ad-CIDECtg) and CIDEC E186X variant (Ad-CIDECmut) transgene specifically in the adipose tissue. We found that Ad-CIDECtg but not Ad-CIDECmut mice were protected against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance. Furthermore, we revealed the role of CIDEC in lipid metabolism using transcriptomics and lipidomics. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoproteins were lower in HFD-fed Ad-CIDECtg mice compared to their littermate controls. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that CIDEC regulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase via interacting with its activator, CGI-58, to reduce free fatty acid release and lipotoxicity. In addition, we confirmed that CIDEC is indeed a vital regulator of lipolysis in adipose tissue of obese humans and treatment with recombinant CIDEC decreased triglyceride breakdown in visceral human adipose tissue. Our study unravels a central pathway whereby adipocyte-specific CIDEC plays a pivotal role in regulating adipose lipid-metabolism and whole-body glucose homeostasis. In summary, our findings identify human CIDEC as a potential 'drug' or a 'druggable' target to reverse obesity-induced lipotoxicity and glucose intolerance.
ESTHER : Gupta_2022_J.Biol.Chem__
PubMedSearch : Gupta_2022_J.Biol.Chem__
PubMedID: 35963433
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD5

Title : Improved cognition without adverse effects: novel M1 muscarinic potentiator compares favorably to donepezil and xanomeline in rhesus monkey - Vardigan_2015_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_232_1859
Author(s) : Vardigan JD , Cannon CE , Puri V , Dancho M , Koser A , Wittmann M , Kuduk SD , Renger JJ , Uslaner JM
Ref : Psychopharmacology (Berl) , 232 :1859 , 2015
Abstract : RATIONALE: The standards of care for Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept(R)), are dose-limited due to adverse side-effects. These adverse events lead to significant patient non-compliance, constraining the dose and magnitude of efficacy that can be achieved. Non-selective muscarinic receptor orthosteric agonists such as Xanomeline have been shown to be effective in treating symptoms as well, but were also poorly tolerated. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need for a symptomatic treatment that improves symptoms and is better tolerated.
METHODS: We compared donepezil, xanomeline, and the novel selective muscarinic 1 receptor positive allosteric modulator PQCA in combination with donepezil in the object retrieval detour (ORD) cognition test in rhesus macaque. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects (salivation and feces output) were then assessed with all compounds to determine therapeutic window.
RESULTS: All three compounds significantly reduced a scopolamine-induced deficit in ORD. Consistent with what is observed clinically in patients, both donepezil and xanomeline produced significant GI effects in rhesus at doses equal to or less than a fivefold margin from the minimum effective dose that improves cognition. In stark contrast, PQCA produced no GI side effects when tested at the same dose range.
CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest M1 positive allosteric modulators have the potential to improve cognition in Alzheimer's disease with a greater therapeutic margin than the current standard of care, addressing an important unmet medical need.
ESTHER : Vardigan_2015_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_232_1859
PubMedSearch : Vardigan_2015_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_232_1859
PubMedID: 25491927

Title : The selective positive allosteric M1 muscarinic receptor modulator PQCA attenuates learning and memory deficits in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease mouse model - Puri_2015_Behav.Brain.Res_287_96
Author(s) : Puri V , Wang X , Vardigan JD , Kuduk SD , Uslaner JM
Ref : Behavioural Brain Research , 287 :96 , 2015
Abstract : We have recently shown that the M1 muscarinic receptor positive allosteric modulator, PQCA, improves cognitive performance in rodents and non-human primates administered the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine. The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize the effects of PQCA in a model more relevant to the disease pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Tg2576 transgenic mice that have elevated Abeta were tested in the novel object recognition task to characterize recognition memory as a function of age and treatment with the PQCA. The effects of PQCA were compared to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, the standard of care for Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the effect of co-administering PQCA and donepezil was evaluated. Aged Tg2576 mice demonstrated a deficit in recognition memory that was significantly attenuated by PQCA. The positive control donepezil also reversed the deficit. Furthermore, doses of PQCA and donepezil that were inactive on their own were found to improve recognition memory when given together. These studies suggest that M1 muscarinic receptor positive allosteric modulation can ameliorate memory deficits in disease relevant models of Alzheimer's disease. These data, combined with our previous findings demonstrating PQCA improves scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits in both rodents and non-human primates, suggest that M1 positive allosteric modulators have therapeutic potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
ESTHER : Puri_2015_Behav.Brain.Res_287_96
PubMedSearch : Puri_2015_Behav.Brain.Res_287_96
PubMedID: 25800972

Title : Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) interacts with adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) to regulate lipolysis and insulin sensitivity in human adipocytes - Grahn_2014_J.Biol.Chem_289_12029
Author(s) : Grahn THM , Kaur R , Yin J , Schweiger M , Sharma VM , Lee MJ , Ido Y , Smas CM , Zechner R , Lass A , Puri V
Ref : Journal of Biological Chemistry , 289 :12029 , 2014
Abstract : In adipocytes, lipolysis is a highly regulated process involving hormonal signals, lipid droplet-associated proteins, and lipases. The discovery of new lipid droplet-associated proteins added complexity to the current model of lipolysis. In this study, we used cultured human adipocytes to demonstrate that fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), an abundantly expressed protein in adipocytes, regulates both basal and stimulated lipolysis by interacting with adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, also called desnutrin or PNPLA2). We identified a core domain of FSP27, amino acids 120-220, that interacts with ATGL to inhibit its lipolytic function and promote triglyceride storage. We also defined the role of FSP27 in free fatty acid-induced insulin resistance in adipocytes. FSP27 depletion in human adipocytes increased lipolysis and inhibited insulin signaling by decreasing AKT phosphorylation. However, reducing lipolysis by either depletion of ATGL or expression of exogenous full-length FSP27 or amino acids 120-220 protected human adipocytes against the adverse effects of free fatty acids on insulin signaling. In embryonic fibroblasts derived from ATGL KO mice, exogenous free fatty acids did not affect insulin sensitivity. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for FSP27-ATGL interactions in regulating lipolysis, triglyceride accumulation, and insulin signaling in human adipocytes.
ESTHER : Grahn_2014_J.Biol.Chem_289_12029
PubMedSearch : Grahn_2014_J.Biol.Chem_289_12029
PubMedID: 24627478

Title : The nicotinic alpha7 receptor agonist GTS-21 improves cognitive performance in ketamine impaired rhesus monkeys - Cannon_2013_Neuropharmacol_64_191
Author(s) : Cannon CE , Puri V , Vivian JA , Egbertson MS , Eddins D , Uslaner JM
Ref : Neuropharmacology , 64 :191 , 2013
Abstract : The cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia are recognized as a core component of the disorder yet there remain no available therapeutics to treat these symptoms of the disease As a result there is a need for establishing predictive preclinical models to identify the therapeutic potential of novel compounds In the present study rhesus monkeys were trained in the object retrieval-detour task which is dependent on the prefrontal cortex a brain region implicated in the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia The NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine significantly impaired performance without affecting measures of motor or visuospatial abilities Pre-treatment with the nicotinic alpha7 agonist GTS-21 0.03 mg/kg significantly attenuated the ketamine-induced impairment consistent with reports from clinical trials suggesting that nicotinic alpha7 receptor agonism has pro-cognitive potential in clinical populations In contrast pretreatment with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil failed to reverse the ketamine-induced impairment consistent with studies showing a lack of pro-cognitive effects in patients with schizophrenia These data suggest that the ketamine-impaired object retrieval-detour task could provide a model with improved predictive validity for drug development and confirm the need for additional efforts in back-translation This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Cognitive Enhancers'.
ESTHER : Cannon_2013_Neuropharmacol_64_191
PubMedSearch : Cannon_2013_Neuropharmacol_64_191
PubMedID: 22659472

Title : The muscarinic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulator PQCA improves cognitive measures in rat, cynomolgus macaque, and rhesus macaque - Uslaner_2013_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_225_21
Author(s) : Uslaner JM , Eddins D , Puri V , Cannon CE , Sutcliffe J , Chew CS , Pearson M , Vivian JA , Chang RK , Ray WJ , Kuduk SD , Wittmann M
Ref : Psychopharmacology (Berl) , 225 :21 , 2013
Abstract : RATIONALE: The current standards of care for Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, have limited efficacy due to a host of mechanism-related side effects arising from indiscriminate activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The M1 muscarinic receptor is predominantly expressed in the brain in regions involved in cognition, and therefore selective activation of the M1 receptor would be expected to boost cognitive performance with reduced risk of peripheral side effects. OBJECTIVES: Here we investigated whether the selective M1 muscarinic receptor positive allosteric modulator, PQCA, improves cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow.
RESULTS: PQCA attenuated a scopolamine-induced deficit in novel object recognition in rat, self-ordered spatial search in cynomolgus macaque, and the object retrieval detour task in rhesus macaque. Beneficial effects in each of these assays and species were observed at similar plasma drug concentrations. Furthermore, at similar drug concentrations that were effective in the behavioral studies, PQCA increased blood flow in the frontal cortex of mice, providing a translational biomarker that could be used to guide dose selection for clinical studies.
CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide a framework for appropriately testing an M1 selective compound in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
ESTHER : Uslaner_2013_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_225_21
PubMedSearch : Uslaner_2013_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_225_21
PubMedID: 22825578

Title : The sequence of the human genome - Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
Author(s) : Venter JC , Adams MD , Myers EW , Li PW , Mural RJ , Sutton GG , Smith HO , Yandell M , Evans CA , Holt RA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides P , Ballew RM , Huson DH , Wortman JR , Zhang Q , Kodira CD , Zheng XH , Chen L , Skupski M , Subramanian G , Thomas PD , Zhang J , Gabor Miklos GL , Nelson C , Broder S , Clark AG , Nadeau J , McKusick VA , Zinder N , Levine AJ , Roberts RJ , Simon M , Slayman C , Hunkapiller M , Bolanos R , Delcher A , Dew I , Fasulo D , Flanigan M , Florea L , Halpern A , Hannenhalli S , Kravitz S , Levy S , Mobarry C , Reinert K , Remington K , Abu-Threideh J , Beasley E , Biddick K , Bonazzi V , Brandon R , Cargill M , Chandramouliswaran I , Charlab R , Chaturvedi K , Deng Z , Di Francesco V , Dunn P , Eilbeck K , Evangelista C , Gabrielian AE , Gan W , Ge W , Gong F , Gu Z , Guan P , Heiman TJ , Higgins ME , Ji RR , Ke Z , Ketchum KA , Lai Z , Lei Y , Li Z , Li J , Liang Y , Lin X , Lu F , Merkulov GV , Milshina N , Moore HM , Naik AK , Narayan VA , Neelam B , Nusskern D , Rusch DB , Salzberg S , Shao W , Shue B , Sun J , Wang Z , Wang A , Wang X , Wang J , Wei M , Wides R , Xiao C , Yan C , Yao A , Ye J , Zhan M , Zhang W , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhong F , Zhong W , Zhu S , Zhao S , Gilbert D , Baumhueter S , Spier G , Carter C , Cravchik A , Woodage T , Ali F , An H , Awe A , Baldwin D , Baden H , Barnstead M , Barrow I , Beeson K , Busam D , Carver A , Center A , Cheng ML , Curry L , Danaher S , Davenport L , Desilets R , Dietz S , Dodson K , Doup L , Ferriera S , Garg N , Gluecksmann A , Hart B , Haynes J , Haynes C , Heiner C , Hladun S , Hostin D , Houck J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Johnson J , Kalush F , Kline L , Koduru S , Love A , Mann F , May D , McCawley S , McIntosh T , McMullen I , Moy M , Moy L , Murphy B , Nelson K , Pfannkoch C , Pratts E , Puri V , Qureshi H , Reardon M , Rodriguez R , Rogers YH , Romblad D , Ruhfel B , Scott R , Sitter C , Smallwood M , Stewart E , Strong R , Suh E , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tse S , Vech C , Wang G , Wetter J , Williams S , Williams M , Windsor S , Winn-Deen E , Wolfe K , Zaveri J , Zaveri K , Abril JF , Guigo R , Campbell MJ , Sjolander KV , Karlak B , Kejariwal A , Mi H , Lazareva B , Hatton T , Narechania A , Diemer K , Muruganujan A , Guo N , Sato S , Bafna V , Istrail S , Lippert R , Schwartz R , Walenz B , Yooseph S , Allen D , Basu A , Baxendale J , Blick L , Caminha M , Carnes-Stine J , Caulk P , Chiang YH , Coyne M , Dahlke C , Mays A , Dombroski M , Donnelly M , Ely D , Esparham S , Fosler C , Gire H , Glanowski S , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gorokhov M , Graham K , Gropman B , Harris M , Heil J , Henderson S , Hoover J , Jennings D , Jordan C , Jordan J , Kasha J , Kagan L , Kraft C , Levitsky A , Lewis M , Liu X , Lopez J , Ma D , Majoros W , McDaniel J , Murphy S , Newman M , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nodell M , Pan S , Peck J , Peterson M , Rowe W , Sanders R , Scott J , Simpson M , Smith T , Sprague A , Stockwell T , Turner R , Venter E , Wang M , Wen M , Wu D , Wu M , Xia A , Zandieh A , Zhu X
Ref : Science , 291 :1304 , 2001
Abstract : A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.
ESTHER : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedSearch : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedID: 11181995
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-BCHE , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CMBL , human-ABHD17A , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LYPLAL1 , human-NDRG2 , human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X , human-NLGN4Y , human-PAFAH2 , human-PREPL , human-RBBP9 , human-SPG21

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3