Chen E

References (8)

Title : Cannabinoid and nicotine exposure during adolescence induces sex-specific effects on anxiety- and reward-related behaviors during adulthood - Pushkin_2019_PLoS.One_14_e0211346
Author(s) : Pushkin AN , Eugene AJ , Lallai V , Torres-Mendoza A , Fowler JP , Chen E , Fowler CD
Ref : PLoS ONE , 14 :e0211346 , 2019
Abstract : Nicotine and cannabis use during adolescence has the potential to induce long lasting changes on affective and cognitive function. Here, we examined whether adolescent exposure to nicotine, the cannabinoid agonist WIN55-212,2 (WIN), or co-exposure to both would alter operant learning, locomotion, and anxiety- and reward-related behaviors in male and female mice during adulthood. Males exposed to a moderate dose of WIN (2 mg/kg) or co-exposed to nicotine and the moderate dose of WIN exhibited decreased anxiety-associated behaviors and increased cognitive flexibility, but did not differ in operant learning or generalized locomotion. In contrast, differences were not found among the females in these measures at the moderate WIN dose or in both sexes with exposure to a low WIN dose (0.2 mg/kg). Furthermore, a sex-dependent dissociative effect was found in natural reward consumption. Males exposed to the moderate dose of WIN or co-exposed to nicotine and the moderate dose of WIN demonstrated increased sucrose consumption. In contrast, females exposed to the moderate dose of WIN exhibited a decrease in sucrose consumption, which was ameliorated with co-administration of nicotine. Together, these novel findings demonstrate that adolescent exposure to cannabinoids in the presence or absence of nicotine results in altered affective and reward-related behaviors during adulthood.
ESTHER : Pushkin_2019_PLoS.One_14_e0211346
PubMedSearch : Pushkin_2019_PLoS.One_14_e0211346
PubMedID: 30703155

Title : Lipase member H is a downstream molecular target of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha and promotes papillary thyroid carcinoma cell migration in BCPAP and KTC-1 cell lines - Li_2019_Cancer.Manag.Res_11_931
Author(s) : Li Y , Zhou X , Zhang Q , Chen E , Sun Y , Ye D , Wang O , Zhang X , Lyu J
Ref : Cancer Manag Res , 11 :931 , 2019
Abstract : Background: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid carcinoma, which is associated with a high incidence of lymph-node metastasis. Multiple biomarkers have been identified for the precise diagnosis of PTC at an early stage. However, their role in PTC remains poorly elucidated. Previously, we reported that lipase H (LIPH), a membrane-bound protein, was highly expressed in PTC. This study aimed to fully elucidate the causal role of LIPH in the development of PTC and investigated its relationship with lymph-node metastasis in PTC. Materials and methods: Quantitative reverse transcription PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the mRNA and protein expression levels of LIPH in 45 and 6 pairs of PTC tissues and adjacent normal tissues, respectively. Clinical tissue data of 504 PTC tissues and 60 normal thyroid tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas database were used to analyze the correlation between LIPH expression level and clinical features in PTC. siRNAs were used to knock down genes, while plasmids were used to overexpress genes. Two PTC cell lines (KTC-1 and BCPAP) were used in subsequent cytological function studies. In addition, a hypoxia stress model was constructed using cobaltous chloride hexahydrate reagent, and the protein expression level of the corresponding biomarkers was measured by Western blotting. Results: This study revealed that high expression of LIPH in PTC was closely associated with lymph-node metastasis. Our cellular function experiments indicated that LIPH positively correlated with the malignant behavior of PTC cell lines. We further confirmed the role of LIPH in hypoxia and its relationship with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway in PTC. Conclusion: LIPH plays an important role in PTC oncogenesis and development, especially in lymph-node metastasis. It can be regarded as a biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of PTC in the near future.
ESTHER : Li_2019_Cancer.Manag.Res_11_931
PubMedSearch : Li_2019_Cancer.Manag.Res_11_931
PubMedID: 30774423

Title : Altered Baseline and Nicotine-Mediated Behavioral and Cholinergic Profiles in ChAT-Cre Mouse Lines - Chen_2018_J.Neurosci_38_2177
Author(s) : Chen E , Lallai V , Sherafat Y , Grimes NP , Pushkin AN , Fowler JP , Fowler CD
Ref : Journal of Neuroscience , 38 :2177 , 2018
Abstract : The recent development of transgenic rodent lines expressing cre recombinase in a cell-specific manner, along with advances in engineered viral vectors, has permitted in-depth investigations into circuit function. However, emerging evidence has begun to suggest that genetic modifications may introduce unexpected caveats. In the current studies, we sought to extensively characterize male and female mice from both the ChAT(BAC)-Cre mouse line, created with the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) method, and ChAT(IRES)-Cre mouse line, generated with the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) method. ChAT(BAC)-Cre transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in general locomotor behavior, anxiety measures, drug-induced cataplexy, nicotine-mediated hypolocomotion, or operant food training. However, ChAT(BAC)-Cre transgenic mice did exhibit significant deficits in intravenous nicotine self-administration, which paralleled an increase in vesicular acetylcholine transporter and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) hippocampal expression. For the ChAT(IRES)-Cre line, transgenic mice exhibited deficits in baseline locomotor, nicotine-mediated hypolocomotion, and operant food training compared with wild-type and hemizygous littermates. No differences among ChAT(IRES)-Cre wild-type, hemizygous, and transgenic littermates were found in anxiety measures, drug-induced cataplexy, and nicotine self-administration. Given that increased cre expression was present in the ChAT(IRES)-Cre transgenic mice, as well as a decrease in ChAT expression in the hippocampus, altered neuronal function may underlie behavioral phenotypes. In contrast, ChAT(IRES)-Cre hemizygous mice were more similar to wild-type mice in both protein expression and the majority of behavioral assessments. As such, interpretation of data derived from ChAT-Cre rodents must consider potential limitations dependent on the line and/or genotype used in research investigations.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Altered baseline and/or nicotine-mediated behavioral profiles were discovered in transgenic mice from the ChAT(BAC)-Cre and ChAT(IRES)-Cre lines. Given that these cre-expressing mice have become increasingly used by the scientific community, either independently with chemicogenetic and optogenetic viral vectors or crossed with other transgenic lines, the current studies highlight important considerations for the interpretation of data from previous and future experimental investigations. Moreover, the current findings detail the behavioral effects of either increased or decreased baseline cholinergic signaling mechanisms on locomotor, anxiety, learning/memory, and intravenous nicotine self-administration behaviors.
ESTHER : Chen_2018_J.Neurosci_38_2177
PubMedSearch : Chen_2018_J.Neurosci_38_2177
PubMedID: 29371319

Title : Development and validation of a novel score for fibrosis staging in patients with chronic hepatitis B - Wu_2018_Liver.Int_38_1930
Author(s) : Wu D , Rao Q , Chen W , Ji F , Xie Z , Huang K , Chen E , Zhao Y , Ouyang X , Zhang S , Jiang Z , Zhang L , Xu L , Gao H , Li L
Ref : Liver Int , 38 :1930 , 2018
Abstract : BACKGROUND & AIMS: Non-invasive assessment methods for liver fibrosis are urgently needed. The present study aimed to develop a novel diagnostic model for fibrosis staging in patients with chronic hepatitis B. METHODS: A cross-sectional set of 417 chronic hepatitis B patients who underwent liver biopsy was enrolled and the METAVIR score was adopted as the reference of fibrosis staging. RESULTS: Among thyroid hormones, only the level of free tetraiodothyronine (FT4) decreased gradually with the METAVIR fibrosis score (P < .001). FibroStage, a novel diagnosis model that incorporates data on FT4, platelets, cholinesterase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and age, was developed using the deriving set (n = 219). For the diagnosis of significant fibrosis, the FibroStage model had a significantly higher area under the receiver operating curve than did the FibroIndex, Forn, and Lok models (all of P < .01) and tended to better than the fibrosis-4 (P = .0791) but comparable with the aspartate transaminase-to-platelet ratio index model (P = .1694). For the diagnosis of advanced fibrosis, FibroStage had a higher area under the receiver operating curve than did the aspartate transaminase-to-platelet ratio index, FibroIndex, Forn, and Lok models (all of P < .05) and had a comparable area under the receiver operating curve with the fibrosis-4 model (P = .2109). For the diagnosis of cirrhosis, the area under the receiver operating curve of FibroStage was higher than those of the aspartate transaminase-to-platelet ratio index, fibrosis-4, FibroIndex, and Lok (all of P < .05) models and was comparable with Forn (P = .1649). These results was validated by a validation set (n = 198). CONCLUSION: FT4 may be an indicator for fibrosis staging in chronic hepatitis B patients. FibroStage is a better model than aspartate transaminase-to-platelet ratio index, fibrosis-4, FibroIndex, Forn, and Lok for the comprehensively diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis.
ESTHER : Wu_2018_Liver.Int_38_1930
PubMedSearch : Wu_2018_Liver.Int_38_1930
PubMedID: 29654711

Title : Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca E718, a New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1-producing nosocomial strain - Liao_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_5454
Author(s) : Liao TL , Lin AC , Chen E , Huang TW , Liu YM , Chang YH , Lai JF , Lauderdale TL , Wang JT , Chang SC , Tsai SF , Chen YT
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 194 :5454 , 2012
Abstract : We report the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca E718, a New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing strain isolated from a renal transplant patient. The genome contains a 6,097,032-bp chromosome and two multidrug resistance plasmids with sizes of 324,906 bp and 110,781 bp.
ESTHER : Liao_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_5454
PubMedSearch : Liao_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_5454
PubMedID: 22965083
Gene_locus related to this paper: kleox-h3l7b3 , klep7-y1077 , kleox-z5vsa8 , kleox-v3ks46

Title : The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome - Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
Author(s) : Ross MT , Grafham DV , Coffey AJ , Scherer S , McLay K , Muzny D , Platzer M , Howell GR , Burrows C , Bird CP , Frankish A , Lovell FL , Howe KL , Ashurst JL , Fulton RS , Sudbrak R , Wen G , Jones MC , Hurles ME , Andrews TD , Scott CE , Searle S , Ramser J , Whittaker A , Deadman R , Carter NP , Hunt SE , Chen R , Cree A , Gunaratne P , Havlak P , Hodgson A , Metzker ML , Richards S , Scott G , Steffen D , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Ainscough R , Ambrose KD , Ansari-Lari MA , Aradhya S , Ashwell RI , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Ballabio A , Banerjee R , Barker GE , Barlow KF , Barrett IP , Bates KN , Beare DM , Beasley H , Beasley O , Beck A , Bethel G , Blechschmidt K , Brady N , Bray-Allen S , Bridgeman AM , Brown AJ , Brown MJ , Bonnin D , Bruford EA , Buhay C , Burch P , Burford D , Burgess J , Burrill W , Burton J , Bye JM , Carder C , Carrel L , Chako J , Chapman JC , Chavez D , Chen E , Chen G , Chen Y , Chen Z , Chinault C , Ciccodicola A , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee CM , Clegg S , Clerc-Blankenburg K , Clifford K , Cobley V , Cole CG , Conquer JS , Corby N , Connor RE , David R , Davies J , Davis C , Davis J , Delgado O , Deshazo D , Dhami P , Ding Y , Dinh H , Dodsworth S , Draper H , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunham A , Dunn M , Durbin KJ , Dutta I , Eades T , Ellwood M , Emery-Cohen A , Errington H , Evans KL , Faulkner L , Francis F , Frankland J , Fraser AE , Galgoczy P , Gilbert J , Gill R , Glockner G , Gregory SG , Gribble S , Griffiths C , Grocock R , Gu Y , Gwilliam R , Hamilton C , Hart EA , Hawes A , Heath PD , Heitmann K , Hennig S , Hernandez J , Hinzmann B , Ho S , Hoffs M , Howden PJ , Huckle EJ , Hume J , Hunt PJ , Hunt AR , Isherwood J , Jacob L , Johnson D , Jones S , de Jong PJ , Joseph SS , Keenan S , Kelly S , Kershaw JK , Khan Z , Kioschis P , Klages S , Knights AJ , Kosiura A , Kovar-Smith C , Laird GK , Langford C , Lawlor S , Leversha M , Lewis L , Liu W , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Loulseged H , Loveland JE , Lovell JD , Lozado R , Lu J , Lyne R , Ma J , Maheshwari M , Matthews LH , McDowall J , Mclaren S , McMurray A , Meidl P , Meitinger T , Milne S , Miner G , Mistry SL , Morgan M , Morris S , Muller I , Mullikin JC , Nguyen N , Nordsiek G , Nyakatura G , O'Dell CN , Okwuonu G , Palmer S , Pandian R , Parker D , Parrish J , Pasternak S , Patel D , Pearce AV , Pearson DM , Pelan SE , Perez L , Porter KM , Ramsey Y , Reichwald K , Rhodes S , Ridler KA , Schlessinger D , Schueler MG , Sehra HK , Shaw-Smith C , Shen H , Sheridan EM , Shownkeen R , Skuce CD , Smith ML , Sotheran EC , Steingruber HE , Steward CA , Storey R , Swann RM , Swarbreck D , Tabor PE , Taudien S , Taylor T , Teague B , Thomas K , Thorpe A , Timms K , Tracey A , Trevanion S , Tromans AC , d'Urso M , Verduzco D , Villasana D , Waldron L , Wall M , Wang Q , Warren J , Warry GL , Wei X , West A , Whitehead SL , Whiteley MN , Wilkinson JE , Willey DL , Williams G , Williams L , Williamson A , Williamson H , Wilming L , Woodmansey RL , Wray PW , Yen J , Zhang J , Zhou J , Zoghbi H , Zorilla S , Buck D , Reinhardt R , Poustka A , Rosenthal A , Lehrach H , Meindl A , Minx PJ , Hillier LW , Willard HF , Wilson RK , Waterston RH , Rice CM , Vaudin M , Coulson A , Nelson DL , Weinstock G , Sulston JE , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Gibbs RA , Beck S , Rogers J , Bentley DR
Ref : Nature , 434 :325 , 2005
Abstract : The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
ESTHER : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedSearch : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedID: 15772651
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 4 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
Author(s) : Mayer K , Schuller C , Wambutt R , Murphy G , Volckaert G , Pohl T , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Entian KD , Terryn N , Harris B , Ansorge W , Brandt P , Grivell L , Rieger M , Weichselgartner M , de Simone V , Obermaier B , Mache R , Muller M , Kreis M , Delseny M , Puigdomenech P , Watson M , Schmidtheini T , Reichert B , Portatelle D , Perez-Alonso M , Boutry M , Bancroft I , Vos P , Hoheisel J , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Ridley P , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Bilham L , Robben J , Van der Schueren J , Grymonprez B , Chuang YJ , Vandenbussche F , Braeken M , Weltjens I , Voet M , Bastiaens I , Aert R , Defoor E , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Ramsperger U , Hilbert H , Braun M , Holzer E , Brandt A , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirske W , Mooijman P , Klein Lankhorst R , Rose M , Hauf J , Kotter P , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Van den Daele H , De Keyser A , Buysshaert C , Gielen J , Villarroel R , De Clercq R , van Montagu M , Rogers J , Cronin A , Quail M , Bray-Allen S , Clark L , Doggett J , Hall S , Kay M , Lennard N , McLay K , Mayes R , Pettett A , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Benes V , Rechmann S , Borkova D , Blocker H , Scharfe M , Grimm M , Lohnert TH , Dose S , de Haan M , Maarse A , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Fartmann B , Granderath K , Dauner D , Herzl A , Neumann S , Argiriou A , Vitale D , Liguori R , Piravandi E , Massenet O , Quigley F , Clabauld G , Mundlein A , Felber R , Schnabl S , Hiller R , Schmidt W , Lecharny A , Aubourg S , Chefdor F , Cooke R , Berger C , Montfort A , Casacuberta E , Gibbons T , Weber N , Vandenbol M , Bargues M , Terol J , Torres A , Perez-Perez A , Purnelle B , Bent E , Johnson S , Tacon D , Jesse T , Heijnen L , Schwarz S , Scholler P , Heber S , Francs P , Bielke C , Frishman D , Haase D , Lemcke K , Mewes HW , Stocker S , Zaccaria P , Bevan M , Wilson RK , de la Bastide M , Habermann K , Parnell L , Dedhia N , Gnoj L , Schutz K , Huang E , Spiegel L , Sehkon M , Murray J , Sheet P , Cordes M , Abu-Threideh J , Stoneking T , Kalicki J , Graves T , Harmon G , Edwards J , Latreille P , Courtney L , Cloud J , Abbott A , Scott K , Johnson D , Minx P , Bentley D , Fulton B , Miller N , Greco T , Kemp K , Kramer J , Fulton L , Mardis E , Dante M , Pepin K , Hillier L , Nelson J , Spieth J , Ryan E , Andrews S , Geisel C , Layman D , Du H , Ali J , Berghoff A , Jones K , Drone K , Cotton M , Joshu C , Antonoiu B , Zidanic M , Strong C , Sun H , Lamar B , Yordan C , Ma P , Zhong J , Preston R , Vil D , Shekher M , Matero A , Shah R , Swaby IK , O'Shaughnessy A , Rodriguez M , Hoffmann J , Till S , Granat S , Shohdy N , Hasegawa A , Hameed A , Lodhi M , Johnson A , Chen E , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR
Ref : Nature , 402 :769 , 1999
Abstract : The higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is an important model for identifying plant genes and determining their function. To assist biological investigations and to define chromosome structure, a coordinated effort to sequence the Arabidopsis genome was initiated in late 1996. Here we report one of the first milestones of this project, the sequence of chromosome 4. Analysis of 17.38 megabases of unique sequence, representing about 17% of the genome, reveals 3,744 protein coding genes, 81 transfer RNAs and numerous repeat elements. Heterochromatic regions surrounding the putative centromere, which has not yet been completely sequenced, are characterized by an increased frequency of a variety of repeats, new repeats, reduced recombination, lowered gene density and lowered gene expression. Roughly 60% of the predicted protein-coding genes have been functionally characterized on the basis of their homology to known genes. Many genes encode predicted proteins that are homologous to human and Caenorhabditis elegans proteins.
ESTHER : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedSearch : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedID: 10617198
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT4G00500 , arath-AT4G16690 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-AT4g30610 , arath-o65513 , arath-o65713 , arath-LPAAT , arath-f4jt64

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV - Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
Author(s) : Jacq C , Alt-Morbe J , Andre B , Arnold W , Bahr A , Ballesta JP , Bargues M , Baron L , Becker A , Biteau N , Blocker H , Blugeon C , Boskovic J , Brandt P , Bruckner M , Buitrago MJ , Coster F , Delaveau T , del Rey F , Dujon B , Eide LG , Garcia-Cantalejo JM , Goffeau A , Gomez-Peris AC , Granotier C , Hanemann V , Hankeln T , Hoheisel JD , Jager W , Jimenez A , Jonniaux JL , Kramer C , Kuster H , Laamanen P , Legros Y , Louis E , Muller-Rieker S , Monnet A , Moro M , Muller-Auer S , Nussbaumer B , Paricio N , Paulin L , Perea J , Perez-Alonso M , Perez-Ortin JE , Pohl TM , Prydz H , Purnelle B , Rasmussen SW , Remacha M , Revuelta JL , Rieger M , Salom D , Saluz HP , Saiz JE , Saren AM , Schafer M , Scharfe M , Schmidt ER , Schneider C , Scholler P , Schwarz S , Soler-Mira A , Urrestarazu LA , Verhasselt P , Vissers S , Voet M , Volckaert G , Wagner G , Wambutt R , Wedler E , Wedler H , Wolfl S , Harris DE , Bowman S , Brown D , Churcher CM , Connor R , Dedman K , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Hunt S , Jones L , McDonald S , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , Rajandream MA , Richards C , Shore L , Walsh SV , Barrell BG , Dietrich FS , Mulligan J , Allen E , Araujo R , Aviles E , Berno A , Carpenter J , Chen E , Cherry JM , Chung E , Duncan M , Hunicke-Smith S , Hyman R , Komp C , Lashkari D , Lew H , Lin D , Mosedale D , Nakahara K , Namath A , Oefner P , Oh C , Petel FX , Roberts D , Schramm S , Schroeder M , Shogren T , Shroff N , Winant A , Yelton M , Botstein D , Davis RW , Johnston M , Hillier L , Riles L , Albermann K , Hani J , Heumann K , Kleine K , Mewes HW , Zollner A , Zaccaria P
Ref : Nature , 387 :75 , 1997
Abstract : The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV has been determined. Apart from chromosome XII, which contains the 1-2 Mb rDNA cluster, chromosome IV is the longest S. cerevisiae chromosome. It was split into three parts, which were sequenced by a consortium from the European Community, the Sanger Centre, and groups from St Louis and Stanford in the United States. The sequence of 1,531,974 base pairs contains 796 predicted or known genes, 318 (39.9%) of which have been previously identified. Of the 478 new genes, 225 (28.3%) are homologous to previously identified genes and 253 (32%) have unknown functions or correspond to spurious open reading frames (ORFs). On average there is one gene approximately every two kilobases. Superimposed on alternating regional variations in G+C composition, there is a large central domain with a lower G+C content that contains all the yeast transposon (Ty) elements and most of the tRNA genes. Chromosome IV shares with chromosomes II, V, XII, XIII and XV some long clustered duplications which partly explain its origin.
ESTHER : Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
PubMedSearch : Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
PubMedID: 9169867
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-dlhh , yeast-ECM18 , yeast-YDL109C , yeast-YDR428C , yeast-YDR444W