Zhong F

References (8)

Title : Development of novel 2-aminoalkyl-6-(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives as balanced multifunctional agents against Alzheimer's disease - Shi_2022_Eur.J.Med.Chem_230_114098
Author(s) : Shi Y , Zhang H , Song Q , Yu G , Liu Z , Zhong F , Tan Z , Liu X , Deng Y
Ref : Eur Journal of Medicinal Chemistry , 230 :114098 , 2022
Abstract : Based on multitarget-directed ligands approach, through two rounds of screening, a series of 2-aminoalkyl-6-(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as innovative multifunctional agents against Alzheimer's disease. In vitro biological assays indicated that most of the hybrids were endowed with great AChE inhibitory activity, excellent antioxidant activity and moderate Abeta(1-42) aggregation inhibition. Taken both efficacy and balance into account, 12a was identified as the optimal multifunctional ligand with significant inhibition of AChE (EeAChE, IC(50) = 0.20 microM; HuAChE, IC(50) = 37.02 nM) and anti-Abeta activity (IC(50) = 1.92 microM for self-induced Abeta(1-42) aggregation; IC(50) = 1.80 microM for disaggregation of Abeta(1-42) fibrils; IC(50) = 2.18 microM for Cu(2+)-induced Abeta(1-42) aggregation; IC(50) = 1.17 microM for disaggregation of Cu(2+)-induced Abeta(1-42) fibrils; 81.7% for HuAChE-induced Abeta(1-40) aggregation). Moreover, it was equipped with the potential to serve as antioxidant (3.03 Trolox equivalents), metals chelator and anti-neuroinflammation agent for synergetic treatment. Finally, in vivo study demonstrated that 12a, with suitable BBB permeability (log BB = -0.61), could efficaciously ameliorate cognitive dysfunction on scopolamine-treated mice by regulating cholinergic system and oxidative stress simultaneously. Altogether, these results highlight the potential of 12a as an innovative balanced multifunctional candidate for Alzheimer's disease treatment.
ESTHER : Shi_2022_Eur.J.Med.Chem_230_114098
PubMedSearch : Shi_2022_Eur.J.Med.Chem_230_114098
PubMedID: 35026532

Title : Pancreatic Cancer Cell-Derived Exosomes Promote Lymphangiogenesis by Downregulating ABHD11-AS1 Expression - Zhou_2022_Cancers.(Basel)_14_
Author(s) : Zhou X , Zhong F , Yan Y , Wu S , Wang H , Liu J , Li F , Cui D , Xu M
Ref : Cancers (Basel) , 14 : , 2022
Abstract : Research on pancreatic cancer microbiomes has attracted attention in recent years. The current view is that enriched microbial communities in pancreatic cancer tissues may affect pancreatic cancer metastasis, including lymph node (LN) metastasis. Similar to carriers of genetic information between cells, such as DNA, mRNA, protein, and non-coding RNA, exosomes are of great importance in early LN metastasis in tumors, including pancreatic cancer. Our previous study showed that the long non-coding RNA ABHD11-AS1 was highly expressed in tissues of patients with pancreatic cancer, and was correlated with patient survival time. However, the role of ABHD11-AS1 in pancreatic cancer LN metastasis has rarely been studied. Hence, in this paper we confirmed that exosomes derived from pancreatic cancer cells could promote lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and that the mechanism was related to the downregulation of ABHD11-AS1 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells, and to the enhancement of their ability to proliferate, migrate, and form tubes. These findings preliminarily show a new mechanism by which pancreatic cancer cells regulate peripheral lymphangiogenesis, providing a new therapeutic strategy for inhibiting LN metastasis in pancreatic cancer.
ESTHER : Zhou_2022_Cancers.(Basel)_14_
PubMedSearch : Zhou_2022_Cancers.(Basel)_14_
PubMedID: 36230535
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD11

Title : Characterization of the anti-AChE potential and alkaloids in Rhizoma Coptidis from different Coptis species combined with spectrum-effect relationship and molecular docking - Qi_2022_Front.Plant.Sci_13_1020309
Author(s) : Qi L , Zhong F , Liu N , Wang J , Nie K , Tan Y , Ma Y , Xia L
Ref : Front Plant Sci , 13 :1020309 , 2022
Abstract : Coptis species are the main source of Rhizoma Coptidis (RC) drugs, which have always been used to treat Alzheimer's disease in the clinical experience of ancient China. However, many species of this genus have been largely underutilized until now. With this fact, this research has been designed to investigate for the first time the anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) property of different extracts for RC drugs from four Coptis species (C. chinensis, C. deltoidea, C. teeta and C. omeiensis) and to quantify the main alkaloids. Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of RC drugs were sequentially collected using an accelerated solvent extraction technique. Spectrum-effect relationship and molecular docking were applied to analyse the relationships between alkaloids and AChE inhibitory activity. The N-butanol extract was proven to be the main active fraction, and C. teeta may be the best source of RC drugs for Alzheimer's disease treatment, with significantly lower IC 20, IC 50 and IC 80 values for AChE inhibition. The UPLC/QqQ-MS quantitative analysis showed that the accumulations of 10 alkaloids in RC drugs from different sources greatly varied. Three data processing methods (Random forest, Boruta and Pearson correlation) comprehensively analysed the spectrum-effect relationship and revealed that columbamine, berberine and palmatine were the most important AChE inhibitors that could be used as quality markers to select RC drugs for Alzheimer's disease treatment. In addition, the dominant compounds were successfully docked against AChE to verify the binding affinity and interactions with the active site. The present study can contribute to the reasonable development and utilization of RC drugs from different sources, especially to provide certain evidence for their application in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
ESTHER : Qi_2022_Front.Plant.Sci_13_1020309
PubMedSearch : Qi_2022_Front.Plant.Sci_13_1020309
PubMedID: 36388527

Title : Structural and biochemical mechanisms of NLRP1 inhibition by DPP9 - Huang_2021_Nature__
Author(s) : Huang M , Zhang X , Toh GA , Gong Q , Wang J , Han Z , Wu B , Zhong F , Chai J
Ref : Nature , : , 2021
Abstract : Nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) mediate innate immunity by forming inflammasomes. Activation of the NLR protein NLRP1 requires autocleavage within its function-to-find domain (FIIND)(1-7). In resting cells, the dipeptidyl peptidases DPP8 and DPP9 interact with the FIIND of NLRP1 and suppress spontaneous NLRP1 activation(8,9); however, the mechanisms through which this occurs remain unknown. Here we present structural and biochemical evidence that full-length rat NLRP1 (rNLRP1) and rat DPP9 (rDPP9) form a 2:1 complex that contains an autoinhibited rNLRP1 molecule and an active UPA-CARD fragment of rNLRP1. The ZU5 domain is required not only for autoinhibition of rNLRP1 but also for assembly of the 2:1 complex. Formation of the complex prevents UPA-mediated higher-order oligomerization of UPA-CARD fragments and strengthens ZU5-mediated NLRP1 autoinhibition. Structure-guided biochemical and functional assays show that both NLRP1 binding and enzymatic activity are required for DPP9 to suppress NLRP1 in human cells. Together, our data reveal the mechanism of DPP9-mediated inhibition of NLRP1 and shed light on the activation of the NLRP1 inflammasome.
ESTHER : Huang_2021_Nature__
PubMedSearch : Huang_2021_Nature__
PubMedID: 33731929
Gene_locus related to this paper: rat-dpp9

Title : Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of conjugated linoleyl beta-sitosterol and its cholesterol-lowering properties in mice - Li_2010_J.Agric.Food.Chem_58_1898
Author(s) : Li R , Jia CS , Yue L , Zhang XM , Xia QY , Zhao SL , Feng B , Zhong F , Chen WJ
Ref : Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , 58 :1898 , 2010
Abstract : Conjugated linoleyl beta-sitosterol (CLS) was prepared from beta-sitosterol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) via lipase-catalyzed synthesis in n-hexane in the presence of molecular sieves. Its plasma cholesterol-lowering properties were also studied. The optimal biosynthesis conditions were as follows: beta-sitosterol concentration of 50 micromol/mL, the molar ratio of CLA to beta-sitosterol of 1:1, the lipase concentration of 20 mg/mL, and 4 A molecular sieve concentration of 60 mg/mL in n-hexane at 50 degrees C with vigorous shaking of 150 rpm for 72 h, and the highest yield of CLS reached 72.6%. The isolated CLS mixed with mice feed had good cholesterol-lowering properties. It decreased serum total cholesterol (TC), serum triacylglycerols (TAGs), serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), atherogenic index (AI), liver weight (LW), liver index (LI), liver TC, and TAGs of mice, which was shown that CLS could prevent the formation of atherosclerosis and moderate the fat pathologic changes of liver. However, the HDL-C was not decreased, which proved the advantage of CLS over the other cholesterol-lowering products.
ESTHER : Li_2010_J.Agric.Food.Chem_58_1898
PubMedSearch : Li_2010_J.Agric.Food.Chem_58_1898
PubMedID: 20055411

Title : Large-scale cDNA transfection screening for genes related to cancer development and progression - Wan_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_15724
Author(s) : Wan D , Gong Y , Qin W , Zhang P , Li J , Wei L , Zhou X , Li H , Qiu X , Zhong F , He L , Yu J , Yao G , Jiang H , Qian L , Yu Y , Shu H , Chen X , Xu H , Guo M , Pan Z , Chen Y , Ge C , Yang S , Gu J
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :15724 , 2004
Abstract : A large-scale assay was performed by transfecting 29,910 individual cDNA clones derived from human placenta, fetus, and normal liver tissues into human hepatoma cells and 22,926 cDNA clones into mouse NIH 3T3 cells. Based on the results of colony formation in hepatoma cells and foci formation in NIH 3T3 cells, 3,806 cDNA species (8,237 clones) were found to possess the ability of either stimulating or inhibiting cell growth. Among them, 2,836 (6,958 clones) were known genes, 372 (384 clones) were previously unrecognized genes, and 598 (895 clones) were unigenes of uncharacterized structure and function. A comprehensive analysis of the genes and the potential mechanisms for their involvement in the regulation of cell growth is provided. The genes were classified into four categories: I, genes related to the basic cellular mechanism for growth and survival; II, genes related to the cellular microenvironment; III, genes related to host-cell systemic regulation; and IV, genes of miscellaneous function. The extensive growth-regulatory activity of genes with such highly diversified functions suggests that cancer may be related to multiple levels of cellular and systemic controls. The present assay provides a direct genomewide functional screening method. It offers a better understanding of the basic machinery of oncogenesis, including previously undescribed systemic regulatory mechanisms, and also provides a tool for gene discovery with potential clinical applications.
ESTHER : Wan_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_15724
PubMedSearch : Wan_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_15724
PubMedID: 15498874

Title : A comparison of whole-genome shotgun-derived mouse chromosome 16 and the human genome - Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
Author(s) : Mural RJ , Adams MD , Myers EW , Smith HO , Miklos GL , Wides R , Halpern A , Li PW , Sutton GG , Nadeau J , Salzberg SL , Holt RA , Kodira CD , Lu F , Chen L , Deng Z , Evangelista CC , Gan W , Heiman TJ , Li J , Li Z , Merkulov GV , Milshina NV , Naik AK , Qi R , Shue BC , Wang A , Wang J , Wang X , Yan X , Ye J , Yooseph S , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhu SC , Biddick K , Bolanos R , Delcher AL , Dew IM , Fasulo D , Flanigan MJ , Huson DH , Kravitz SA , Miller JR , Mobarry CM , Reinert K , Remington KA , Zhang Q , Zheng XH , Nusskern DR , Lai Z , Lei Y , Zhong W , Yao A , Guan P , Ji RR , Gu Z , Wang ZY , Zhong F , Xiao C , Chiang CC , Yandell M , Wortman JR , Amanatides PG , Hladun SL , Pratts EC , Johnson JE , Dodson KL , Woodford KJ , Evans CA , Gropman B , Rusch DB , Venter E , Wang M , Smith TJ , Houck JT , Tompkins DE , Haynes C , Jacob D , Chin SH , Allen DR , Dahlke CE , Sanders R , Li K , Liu X , Levitsky AA , Majoros WH , Chen Q , Xia AC , Lopez JR , Donnelly MT , Newman MH , Glodek A , Kraft CL , Nodell M , Ali F , An HJ , Baldwin-Pitts D , Beeson KY , Cai S , Carnes M , Carver A , Caulk PM , Center A , Chen YH , Cheng ML , Coyne MD , Crowder M , Danaher S , Davenport LB , Desilets R , Dietz SM , Doup L , Dullaghan P , Ferriera S , Fosler CR , Gire HC , Gluecksmann A , Gocayne JD , Gray J , Hart B , Haynes J , Hoover J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Johns D , Kline L , Ma DS , MacCawley S , Magoon A , Mann F , May D , McIntosh TC , Mehta S , Moy L , Moy MC , Murphy BJ , Murphy SD , Nelson KA , Nuri Z , Parker KA , Prudhomme AC , Puri VN , Qureshi H , Raley JC , Reardon MS , Regier MA , Rogers YH , Romblad DL , Schutz J , Scott JL , Scott R , Sitter CD , Smallwood M , Sprague AC , Stewart E , Strong RV , Suh E , Sylvester K , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tsonis C , Wang G , Williams MS , Williams SM , Windsor SM , Wolfe K , Wu MM , Zaveri J , Chaturvedi K , Gabrielian AE , Ke Z , Sun J , Subramanian G , Venter JC , Pfannkoch CM , Barnstead M , Stephenson LD
Ref : Science , 296 :1661 , 2002
Abstract : The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.
ESTHER : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedSearch : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedID: 12040188
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-ABH15 , mouse-Ces3b , mouse-Ces4a , mouse-dpp4 , mouse-FAP , mouse-Lipg , mouse-Q8C1A9 , mouse-rbbp9 , mouse-SERHL , mouse-SPG21 , mouse-w4vsp6

Title : The sequence of the human genome - Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
Author(s) : Venter JC , Adams MD , Myers EW , Li PW , Mural RJ , Sutton GG , Smith HO , Yandell M , Evans CA , Holt RA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides P , Ballew RM , Huson DH , Wortman JR , Zhang Q , Kodira CD , Zheng XH , Chen L , Skupski M , Subramanian G , Thomas PD , Zhang J , Gabor Miklos GL , Nelson C , Broder S , Clark AG , Nadeau J , McKusick VA , Zinder N , Levine AJ , Roberts RJ , Simon M , Slayman C , Hunkapiller M , Bolanos R , Delcher A , Dew I , Fasulo D , Flanigan M , Florea L , Halpern A , Hannenhalli S , Kravitz S , Levy S , Mobarry C , Reinert K , Remington K , Abu-Threideh J , Beasley E , Biddick K , Bonazzi V , Brandon R , Cargill M , Chandramouliswaran I , Charlab R , Chaturvedi K , Deng Z , Di Francesco V , Dunn P , Eilbeck K , Evangelista C , Gabrielian AE , Gan W , Ge W , Gong F , Gu Z , Guan P , Heiman TJ , Higgins ME , Ji RR , Ke Z , Ketchum KA , Lai Z , Lei Y , Li Z , Li J , Liang Y , Lin X , Lu F , Merkulov GV , Milshina N , Moore HM , Naik AK , Narayan VA , Neelam B , Nusskern D , Rusch DB , Salzberg S , Shao W , Shue B , Sun J , Wang Z , Wang A , Wang X , Wang J , Wei M , Wides R , Xiao C , Yan C , Yao A , Ye J , Zhan M , Zhang W , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhong F , Zhong W , Zhu S , Zhao S , Gilbert D , Baumhueter S , Spier G , Carter C , Cravchik A , Woodage T , Ali F , An H , Awe A , Baldwin D , Baden H , Barnstead M , Barrow I , Beeson K , Busam D , Carver A , Center A , Cheng ML , Curry L , Danaher S , Davenport L , Desilets R , Dietz S , Dodson K , Doup L , Ferriera S , Garg N , Gluecksmann A , Hart B , Haynes J , Haynes C , Heiner C , Hladun S , Hostin D , Houck J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Johnson J , Kalush F , Kline L , Koduru S , Love A , Mann F , May D , McCawley S , McIntosh T , McMullen I , Moy M , Moy L , Murphy B , Nelson K , Pfannkoch C , Pratts E , Puri V , Qureshi H , Reardon M , Rodriguez R , Rogers YH , Romblad D , Ruhfel B , Scott R , Sitter C , Smallwood M , Stewart E , Strong R , Suh E , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tse S , Vech C , Wang G , Wetter J , Williams S , Williams M , Windsor S , Winn-Deen E , Wolfe K , Zaveri J , Zaveri K , Abril JF , Guigo R , Campbell MJ , Sjolander KV , Karlak B , Kejariwal A , Mi H , Lazareva B , Hatton T , Narechania A , Diemer K , Muruganujan A , Guo N , Sato S , Bafna V , Istrail S , Lippert R , Schwartz R , Walenz B , Yooseph S , Allen D , Basu A , Baxendale J , Blick L , Caminha M , Carnes-Stine J , Caulk P , Chiang YH , Coyne M , Dahlke C , Mays A , Dombroski M , Donnelly M , Ely D , Esparham S , Fosler C , Gire H , Glanowski S , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gorokhov M , Graham K , Gropman B , Harris M , Heil J , Henderson S , Hoover J , Jennings D , Jordan C , Jordan J , Kasha J , Kagan L , Kraft C , Levitsky A , Lewis M , Liu X , Lopez J , Ma D , Majoros W , McDaniel J , Murphy S , Newman M , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nodell M , Pan S , Peck J , Peterson M , Rowe W , Sanders R , Scott J , Simpson M , Smith T , Sprague A , Stockwell T , Turner R , Venter E , Wang M , Wen M , Wu D , Wu M , Xia A , Zandieh A , Zhu X
Ref : Science , 291 :1304 , 2001
Abstract : A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.
ESTHER : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedSearch : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedID: 11181995
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-BCHE , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CMBL , human-ABHD17A , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LYPLAL1 , human-NDRG2 , human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X , human-NLGN4Y , human-PAFAH2 , human-PREPL , human-RBBP9 , human-SPG21