Gong F

References (7)

Title : Isorhapontigenin prevents beta-amyloid-associated cognitive impairments through activation of the PI3K\/AKT\/GSK-3beta pathway - Ma_2022_Acta.Neurobiol.Exp.(Wars)_82_389
Author(s) : Ma Q , Li C , He Y , Liu P , Gong F , Zhang W
Ref : Acta Neurobiol Exp (Wars) , 82 :389 , 2022
Abstract : Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease that is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Abeta1-42 is significantly associated with memory deficits and it can increase the level of acetylcholine, promote the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and cause cognitive dysfunction. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) is a stilbene derivative that has antioxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is still unclear whether ISO can affect beta-amyloid-associated cognitive impairments. In this study, we found that ISO improved cognitive dysfunction induced by Abeta1-42 in rats. It inhibited the Abeta-induced activation of M1 microglia and reduced the release of inflammatory cytokines. It alleviated amyloid beta-induced oxidative stress and led to an overall improvement in AD symptoms. Cellularly, we found that ISO alleviated Abeta-induced inflammation and oxidative stress by activating the PI3K/AKT/GSK-3beta pathway and ultimately improved cognitive dysfunction in AD rats.
ESTHER : Ma_2022_Acta.Neurobiol.Exp.(Wars)_82_389
PubMedSearch : Ma_2022_Acta.Neurobiol.Exp.(Wars)_82_389
PubMedID: 36214721

Title : Distinct AMPK-Mediated FAS\/HSL Pathway Is Implicated in the Alleviating Effect of Nuciferine on Obesity and Hepatic Steatosis in HFD-Fed Mice - Xu_2022_Nutrients_14_
Author(s) : Xu H , Lyu X , Guo X , Yang H , Duan L , Zhu H , Pan H , Gong F , Wang L
Ref : Nutrients , 14 : , 2022
Abstract : Nuciferine (Nuci), the main aporphine alkaloid component in lotus leaf, was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in vitro. Herein we investigated whether Nuci prevents obesity in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice and the underlying mechanism in liver/HepG2 hepatocytes and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) /adipocytes. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed with HFD supplemented with Nuci (0.10%) for 12 weeks. We found that Nuci significantly reduced body weight and fat mass, improved glycolipid profiles, and enhanced energy expenditure in HFD-fed mice. Nuci also ameliorated hepatic steatosis and decreased the size of adipocytes. Furthermore, Nuci remarkably promoted the phosphorylation of AMPK, suppressed lipogenesis (SREBP1, FAS, ACC), promoted lipolysis (HSL, ATGL), and increased the expressions of adipokines (FGF21, ZAG) in liver and eWAT. Besides, fatty acid oxidation in liver and thermogenesis in eWAT were also activated by Nuci. Similar results were further observed at cellular level, and these beneficial effects of Nuci in cells were abolished by an effective AMPK inhibitor compound C. In conclusion, Nuci supplementation prevented HFD-induced obesity, attenuated hepatic steatosis, and reduced lipid accumulation in liver/hepatocytes and eWAT/adipocytes through regulating AMPK-mediated FAS/HSL pathway. Our findings provide novel insight into the clinical application of Nuci in treating obesity and related complications.
ESTHER : Xu_2022_Nutrients_14_
PubMedSearch : Xu_2022_Nutrients_14_
PubMedID: 35565866

Title : Neurotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid and post-exposure recovery due to blueberry anthocyanins in the planarians Dugesia japonica - Zhang_2020_Environ.Pollut_263_114471
Author(s) : Zhang J , Shao X , Zhao B , Zhai L , Liu N , Gong F , Ma X , Pan X , Yuan Z , Zhang X
Ref : Environ Pollut , 263 :114471 , 2020
Abstract : Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widely used synthetic industrial chemical which accumulates in ecosystems and organisms. Our study have investigated the neurobehavioral effects of PFOA and the alleviation effects of PFOA-induced neurotoxicity by blueberry anthocyanins (ANT) in Dugesia japonica. The planarians were exposed to PFOA and ANT for ten days. Researchs showed that exposure to PFOA affected locomotor behavior and ANT significantly alleviated the reduction in locomotion induced by PFOA. The regeneration of eyespots and auricles was suppressed by PFOA and was promoted by ANT. Following exposure to PFOA, acetylcholinesterase activity continually decreased and was unaffected in the ANT group, but was elevated after combined administration of PFOA and ANT. Oxidative DNA damage was found in planarians exposed to PFOA and was attenuated after administration of ANT by the alkaline comet assay. Concentrations of three neurotransmitters increased following exposure to PFOA and decreased after administration of ANT. Furthermore, ANT promoted and PFOA inhibited neuronal regeneration. DjotxA, DjotxB, DjFoxG, DjFoxD and Djnlg associated with neural processes were up-regulated following exposure to PFOA. Our findings indicate that PFOA is a neurotoxicant while ANT can attenuate these detrimental effects.
ESTHER : Zhang_2020_Environ.Pollut_263_114471
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2020_Environ.Pollut_263_114471
PubMedID: 32268227

Title : Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by activating the unfolded protein response - Zhang_2014_Biomed.Rep_2_233
Author(s) : Zhang J , Gong F , Li L , Zhao M , Song J
Ref : Biomed Rep , 2 :233 , 2014
Abstract : N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL), a quorum-sensing signal molecule produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), is involved in the expression of bacterial virulence factors and in the modulation of host immune responses by directly disrupting nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling and inducing cell apoptosis. The unfolded protein response (UPR) triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress may suppress inflammatory responses in the later phase by blocking NF-kappaB activation. It was recently demonstrated that 3-oxo-C12-HSL may induce UPR in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Therefore, 3-oxo-C12-HSL may also inhibit NF-kappaB activation and suppress inflammatory responses by activating UPR. However, the possible underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of 3-oxo-C12-HSL on cellular viability, UPR activation, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-kappaB activation and inflammatory response in the RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cell line. Treatment with 6.25 muM 3-oxo-C12-HSL was not found to affect the viability of RAW264.7 cells. However, pretreating RAW264.7 cells with 6.25 muM 3-oxo-C12-HSL effectively triggered UPR and increased the expression of UPR target genes, such as CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBP beta) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP). The expression of C/EBP beta and CHOP was found to be inversely correlated with LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL pretreatment was also shown to inhibit LPS-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production. Hence, 3-oxo-C12-HSL may attenuate LPS-induced inflammation via UPR-mediated NF-kappaB inhibition without affecting cell viability. This may be another mechanism through which P. aeruginosa evades the host immune system and maintains a persistent infection.
ESTHER : Zhang_2014_Biomed.Rep_2_233
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2014_Biomed.Rep_2_233
PubMedID: 24649102

Title : Genetic characterization and functional analysis of the GID1 gibberellin receptors in Arabidopsis - Griffiths_2006_Plant.Cell_18_3399
Author(s) : Griffiths J , Murase K , Rieu I , Zentella R , Zhang ZL , Powers SJ , Gong F , Phillips AL , Hedden P , Sun TP , Thomas SG
Ref : Plant Cell , 18 :3399 , 2006
Abstract : We investigated the physiological function of three Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the gibberellin (GA) receptor GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1) by determining the developmental consequences of GID1 inactivation in insertion mutants. Although single mutants developed normally, gid1a gid1c and gid1a gid1b displayed reduced stem height and lower male fertility, respectively, indicating some functional specificity. The triple mutant displayed a dwarf phenotype more severe than that of the extreme GA-deficient mutant ga1-3. Flower formation occurred in long days but was delayed, with severe defects in floral organ development. The triple mutant did not respond to applied GA. All three GID1 homologs were expressed in most tissues throughout development but differed in expression level. GA treatment reduced transcript abundance for all three GID1 genes, suggesting feedback regulation. The DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) accumulated in the triple mutant, whose phenotype could be partially rescued by loss of RGA function. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays confirmed that GA enhances the interaction between GID1 and DELLA proteins. In addition, the N-terminal sequence containing the DELLA domain is necessary for GID1 binding. Furthermore, yeast three-hybrid assays showed that the GA-GID1 complex promotes the interaction between RGA and the F-box protein SLY1, a component of the SCF(SLY1) E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets the DELLA protein for degradation.
ESTHER : Griffiths_2006_Plant.Cell_18_3399
PubMedSearch : Griffiths_2006_Plant.Cell_18_3399
PubMedID: 17194763
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT5G27320 , arath-GID1B

Title : The sequence of the human genome - Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
Author(s) : Venter JC , Adams MD , Myers EW , Li PW , Mural RJ , Sutton GG , Smith HO , Yandell M , Evans CA , Holt RA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides P , Ballew RM , Huson DH , Wortman JR , Zhang Q , Kodira CD , Zheng XH , Chen L , Skupski M , Subramanian G , Thomas PD , Zhang J , Gabor Miklos GL , Nelson C , Broder S , Clark AG , Nadeau J , McKusick VA , Zinder N , Levine AJ , Roberts RJ , Simon M , Slayman C , Hunkapiller M , Bolanos R , Delcher A , Dew I , Fasulo D , Flanigan M , Florea L , Halpern A , Hannenhalli S , Kravitz S , Levy S , Mobarry C , Reinert K , Remington K , Abu-Threideh J , Beasley E , Biddick K , Bonazzi V , Brandon R , Cargill M , Chandramouliswaran I , Charlab R , Chaturvedi K , Deng Z , Di Francesco V , Dunn P , Eilbeck K , Evangelista C , Gabrielian AE , Gan W , Ge W , Gong F , Gu Z , Guan P , Heiman TJ , Higgins ME , Ji RR , Ke Z , Ketchum KA , Lai Z , Lei Y , Li Z , Li J , Liang Y , Lin X , Lu F , Merkulov GV , Milshina N , Moore HM , Naik AK , Narayan VA , Neelam B , Nusskern D , Rusch DB , Salzberg S , Shao W , Shue B , Sun J , Wang Z , Wang A , Wang X , Wang J , Wei M , Wides R , Xiao C , Yan C , Yao A , Ye J , Zhan M , Zhang W , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhong F , Zhong W , Zhu S , Zhao S , Gilbert D , Baumhueter S , Spier G , Carter C , Cravchik A , Woodage T , Ali F , An H , Awe A , Baldwin D , Baden H , Barnstead M , Barrow I , Beeson K , Busam D , Carver A , Center A , Cheng ML , Curry L , Danaher S , Davenport L , Desilets R , Dietz S , Dodson K , Doup L , Ferriera S , Garg N , Gluecksmann A , Hart B , Haynes J , Haynes C , Heiner C , Hladun S , Hostin D , Houck J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Johnson J , Kalush F , Kline L , Koduru S , Love A , Mann F , May D , McCawley S , McIntosh T , McMullen I , Moy M , Moy L , Murphy B , Nelson K , Pfannkoch C , Pratts E , Puri V , Qureshi H , Reardon M , Rodriguez R , Rogers YH , Romblad D , Ruhfel B , Scott R , Sitter C , Smallwood M , Stewart E , Strong R , Suh E , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tse S , Vech C , Wang G , Wetter J , Williams S , Williams M , Windsor S , Winn-Deen E , Wolfe K , Zaveri J , Zaveri K , Abril JF , Guigo R , Campbell MJ , Sjolander KV , Karlak B , Kejariwal A , Mi H , Lazareva B , Hatton T , Narechania A , Diemer K , Muruganujan A , Guo N , Sato S , Bafna V , Istrail S , Lippert R , Schwartz R , Walenz B , Yooseph S , Allen D , Basu A , Baxendale J , Blick L , Caminha M , Carnes-Stine J , Caulk P , Chiang YH , Coyne M , Dahlke C , Mays A , Dombroski M , Donnelly M , Ely D , Esparham S , Fosler C , Gire H , Glanowski S , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gorokhov M , Graham K , Gropman B , Harris M , Heil J , Henderson S , Hoover J , Jennings D , Jordan C , Jordan J , Kasha J , Kagan L , Kraft C , Levitsky A , Lewis M , Liu X , Lopez J , Ma D , Majoros W , McDaniel J , Murphy S , Newman M , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nodell M , Pan S , Peck J , Peterson M , Rowe W , Sanders R , Scott J , Simpson M , Smith T , Sprague A , Stockwell T , Turner R , Venter E , Wang M , Wen M , Wu D , Wu M , Xia A , Zandieh A , Zhu X
Ref : Science , 291 :1304 , 2001
Abstract : A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.
ESTHER : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedSearch : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedID: 11181995
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-BCHE , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CMBL , human-ABHD17A , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LYPLAL1 , human-NDRG2 , human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X , human-NLGN4Y , human-PAFAH2 , human-PREPL , human-RBBP9 , human-SPG21

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3