Ashburner M

References (7)

Title : Principles of genome evolution in the Drosophila melanogaster species group - Ranz_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e152
Author(s) : Ranz JM , Maurin D , Chan YS , von Grotthuss M , Hillier LW , Roote J , Ashburner M , Bergman CM
Ref : PLoS Biol , 5 :e152 , 2007
Abstract : That closely related species often differ by chromosomal inversions was discovered by Sturtevant and Plunkett in 1926. Our knowledge of how these inversions originate is still very limited, although a prevailing view is that they are facilitated by ectopic recombination events between inverted repetitive sequences. The availability of genome sequences of related species now allows us to study in detail the mechanisms that generate interspecific inversions. We have analyzed the breakpoint regions of the 29 inversions that differentiate the chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster and two closely related species, D. simulans and D. yakuba, and reconstructed the molecular events that underlie their origin. Experimental and computational analysis revealed that the breakpoint regions of 59% of the inversions (17/29) are associated with inverted duplications of genes or other nonrepetitive sequences. In only two cases do we find evidence for inverted repetitive sequences in inversion breakpoints. We propose that the presence of inverted duplications associated with inversion breakpoint regions is the result of staggered breaks, either isochromatid or chromatid, and that this, rather than ectopic exchange between inverted repetitive sequences, is the prevalent mechanism for the generation of inversions in the melanogaster species group. Outgroup analysis also revealed evidence for widespread breakpoint recycling. Lastly, we have found that expression domains in D. melanogaster may be disrupted in D. yakuba, bringing into question their potential adaptive significance.
ESTHER : Ranz_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e152
PubMedSearch : Ranz_2007_PLoS.Biol_5_e152
PubMedID: 17550304
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-GH02439 , droya-ACHE , droya-aes04 , droya-b4itg2 , droya-b4itg6 , droya-b4itu9 , droya-b4iuv4 , droya-b4iuv5 , droya-b4nxe6 , droya-b4nxg5 , droya-b4nxg6 , droya-b4nxg8 , droya-b4ny57 , droya-b4ny58 , droya-b4ny86 , droya-b4nzz8 , droya-b4p3h4 , droya-b4p3x8 , droya-b4p5g8 , droya-b4p6l9 , droya-b4p6r1 , droya-b4p6r2 , droya-b4p8w7 , droya-b4p241 , droya-b4p774 , droya-b4pat9 , droya-b4pd22 , droya-b4pd70 , droya-b4pdm8 , droya-b4pff9 , droya-b4pga7 , droya-b4pgu0 , droya-b4pka2 , droya-b4plh2 , droya-b4pmv5 , droya-b4pn92 , droya-b4pp65 , droya-b4prg6B , droya-b4prg9 , droya-b4prh3 , droya-b4prh4 , droya-b4prh6 , droya-b4prh7 , droya-b4q0g5 , droya-EST6 , droya-b4p2y4

Title : Combined evidence annotation of transposable elements in genome sequences - Quesneville_2005_PLoS.Comput.Biol_1_166
Author(s) : Quesneville H , Bergman CM , Andrieu O , Autard D , Nouaud D , Ashburner M , Anxolabehere D
Ref : PLoS Comput Biol , 1 :166 , 2005
Abstract : Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile, repetitive sequences that make up significant fractions of metazoan genomes. Despite their near ubiquity and importance in genome and chromosome biology, most efforts to annotate TEs in genome sequences rely on the results of a single computational program, RepeatMasker. In contrast, recent advances in gene annotation indicate that high-quality gene models can be produced from combining multiple independent sources of computational evidence. To elevate the quality of TE annotations to a level comparable to that of gene models, we have developed a combined evidence-model TE annotation pipeline, analogous to systems used for gene annotation, by integrating results from multiple homology-based and de novo TE identification methods. As proof of principle, we have annotated "TE models" in Drosophila melanogaster Release 4 genomic sequences using the combined computational evidence derived from RepeatMasker, BLASTER, TBLASTX, all-by-all BLASTN, RECON, TE-HMM and the previous Release 3.1 annotation. Our system is designed for use with the Apollo genome annotation tool, allowing automatic results to be curated manually to produce reliable annotations. The euchromatic TE fraction of D. melanogaster is now estimated at 5.3% (cf. 3.86% in Release 3.1), and we found a substantially higher number of TEs (n = 6,013) than previously identified (n = 1,572). Most of the new TEs derive from small fragments of a few hundred nucleotides long and highly abundant families not previously annotated (e.g., INE-1). We also estimated that 518 TE copies (8.6%) are inserted into at least one other TE, forming a nest of elements. The pipeline allows rapid and thorough annotation of even the most complex TE models, including highly deleted and/or nested elements such as those often found in heterochromatic sequences. Our pipeline can be easily adapted to other genome sequences, such as those of the D. melanogaster heterochromatin or other species in the genus Drosophila.
ESTHER : Quesneville_2005_PLoS.Comput.Biol_1_166
PubMedSearch : Quesneville_2005_PLoS.Comput.Biol_1_166
PubMedID: 16110336
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-CG9542 , drome-CG11309 , drome-KRAKEN , drome-nrtac

Title : Annotation of the Drosophila melanogaster euchromatic genome: a systematic review - Misra_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0083
Author(s) : Misra S , Crosby MA , Mungall CJ , Matthews BB , Campbell KS , Hradecky P , Huang Y , Kaminker JS , Millburn GH , Prochnik SE , Smith CD , Tupy JL , Whitfied EJ , Bayraktaroglu L , Berman BP , Bettencourt BR , Celniker SE , de Grey AD , Drysdale RA , Harris NL , Richter J , Russo S , Schroeder AJ , Shu SQ , Stapleton M , Yamada C , Ashburner M , Gelbart WM , Rubin GM , Lewis SE
Ref : Genome Biol , 3 :RESEARCH0083 , 2002
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The recent completion of the Drosophila melanogaster genomic sequence to high quality and the availability of a greatly expanded set of Drosophila cDNA sequences, aligning to 78% of the predicted euchromatic genes, afforded FlyBase the opportunity to significantly improve genomic annotations. We made the annotation process more rigorous by inspecting each gene visually, utilizing a comprehensive set of curation rules, requiring traceable evidence for each gene model, and comparing each predicted peptide to SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL sequences.
RESULTS: Although the number of predicted protein-coding genes in Drosophila remains essentially unchanged, the revised annotation significantly improves gene models, resulting in structural changes to 85% of the transcripts and 45% of the predicted proteins. We annotated transposable elements and non-protein-coding RNAs as new features, and extended the annotation of untranslated (UTR) sequences and alternative transcripts to include more than 70% and 20% of genes, respectively. Finally, cDNA sequence provided evidence for dicistronic transcripts, neighboring genes with overlapping UTRs on the same DNA sequence strand, alternatively spliced genes that encode distinct, non-overlapping peptides, and numerous nested genes.
CONCLUSIONS: Identification of so many unusual gene models not only suggests that some mechanisms for gene regulation are more prevalent than previously believed, but also underscores the complex challenges of eukaryotic gene prediction. At present, experimental data and human curation remain essential to generate high-quality genome annotations.
ESTHER : Misra_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0083
PubMedSearch : Misra_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0083
PubMedID: 12537572
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG17097 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-q9vux3

Title : The transposable elements of the Drosophila melanogaster euchromatin: a genomics perspective - Kaminker_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0084
Author(s) : Kaminker JS , Bergman CM , Kronmiller B , Carlson J , Svirskas R , Patel S , Frise E , Wheeler DA , Lewis SE , Rubin GM , Ashburner M , Celniker SE
Ref : Genome Biol , 3 :RESEARCH0084 , 2002
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Transposable elements are found in the genomes of nearly all eukaryotes. The recent completion of the Release 3 euchromatic genomic sequence of Drosophila melanogaster by the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project has provided precise sequence for the repetitive elements in the Drosophila euchromatin. We have used this genomic sequence to describe the euchromatic transposable elements in the sequenced strain of this species.
RESULTS: We identified 85 known and eight novel families of transposable element varying in copy number from one to 146. A total of 1,572 full and partial transposable elements were identified, comprising 3.86% of the sequence. More than two-thirds of the transposable elements are partial. The density of transposable elements increases an average of 4.7 times in the centromere-proximal regions of each of the major chromosome arms. We found that transposable elements are preferentially found outside genes; only 436 of 1,572 transposable elements are contained within the 61.4 Mb of sequence that is annotated as being transcribed. A large proportion of transposable elements is found nested within other elements of the same or different classes. Lastly, an analysis of structural variation from different families reveals distinct patterns of deletion for elements belonging to different classes.
CONCLUSIONS: This analysis represents an initial characterization of the transposable elements in the Release 3 euchromatic genomic sequence of D. melanogaster for which comparison to the transposable elements of other organisms can begin to be made. These data have been made available on the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project website for future analyses.
ESTHER : Kaminker_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0084
PubMedSearch : Kaminker_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0084
PubMedID: 12537573
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-CG8058 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG17097 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN

Title : Functional annotation of a full-length mouse cDNA collection - Kawai_2001_Nature_409_685
Author(s) : Kawai J , Shinagawa A , Shibata K , Yoshino M , Itoh M , Ishii Y , Arakawa T , Hara A , Fukunishi Y , Konno H , Adachi J , Fukuda S , Aizawa K , Izawa M , Nishi K , Kiyosawa H , Kondo S , Yamanaka I , Saito T , Okazaki Y , Gojobori T , Bono H , Kasukawa T , Saito R , Kadota K , Matsuda H , Ashburner M , Batalov S , Casavant T , Fleischmann W , Gaasterland T , Gissi C , King B , Kochiwa H , Kuehl P , Lewis S , Matsuo Y , Nikaido I , Pesole G , Quackenbush J , Schriml LM , Staubli F , Suzuki R , Tomita M , Wagner L , Washio T , Sakai K , Okido T , Furuno M , Aono H , Baldarelli R , Barsh G , Blake J , Boffelli D , Bojunga N , Carninci P , de Bonaldo MF , Brownstein MJ , Bult C , Fletcher C , Fujita M , Gariboldi M , Gustincich S , Hill D , Hofmann M , Hume DA , Kamiya M , Lee NH , Lyons P , Marchionni L , Mashima J , Mazzarelli J , Mombaerts P , Nordone P , Ring B , Ringwald M , Rodriguez I , Sakamoto N , Sasaki H , Sato K , Schonbach C , Seya T , Shibata Y , Storch KF , Suzuki H , Toyo-oka K , Wang KH , Weitz C , Whittaker C , Wilming L , Wynshaw-Boris A , Yoshida K , Hasegawa Y , Kawaji H , Kohtsuki S , Hayashizaki Y
Ref : Nature , 409 :685 , 2001
Abstract : The RIKEN Mouse Gene Encyclopaedia Project, a systematic approach to determining the full coding potential of the mouse genome, involves collection and sequencing of full-length complementary DNAs and physical mapping of the corresponding genes to the mouse genome. We organized an international functional annotation meeting (FANTOM) to annotate the first 21,076 cDNAs to be analysed in this project. Here we describe the first RIKEN clone collection, which is one of the largest described for any organism. Analysis of these cDNAs extends known gene families and identifies new ones.
ESTHER : Kawai_2001_Nature_409_685
PubMedSearch : Kawai_2001_Nature_409_685
PubMedID: 11217851
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-1lipg , mouse-1plip , mouse-1plrp , mouse-ABH15 , mouse-abhd5 , mouse-ABHD6 , mouse-Abhd8 , mouse-aryla , mouse-bphl , mouse-cauxin , mouse-Ces1g , mouse-CPMac , mouse-dpp8 , mouse-EPHX1 , mouse-ES10 , mouse-hslip , mouse-hyes , mouse-ABHD2 , mouse-lcat , mouse-lipli , mouse-LIPN , mouse-lypla1 , mouse-lypla2 , mouse-OVCA2 , mouse-pafa , mouse-pcp , mouse-Ppgb , mouse-PPME1 , mouse-ppt , mouse-q3uuq7 , mouse-Q9DAI6 , mouse-Q80UX8 , mouse-RISC , mouse-SERHL , mouse-SPG21 , mouse-Tex30

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3

Title : An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: the Adh region - Ashburner_1999_Genetics_153_179
Author(s) : Ashburner M , Misra S , Roote J , Lewis SE , Blazej R , Davis T , Doyle C , Galle R , George R , Harris N , Hartzell G , Harvey D , Hong L , Houston K , Hoskins R , Johnson G , Martin C , Moshrefi A , Palazzolo M , Reese MG , Spradling A , Tsang G , Wan K , Whitelaw K , Celniker S , Rubin GM
Ref : Genetics , 153 :179 , 1999
Abstract : A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized "Adh region." A computational analysis of the sequence predicts 218 protein-coding genes, 11 tRNAs, and 17 transposable element sequences. At least 38 of the protein-coding genes are arranged in clusters of from 2 to 6 closely related genes, suggesting extensive tandem duplication. The gene density is one protein-coding gene every 13 kb; the transposable element density is one element every 171 kb. Of 73 genes in this region identified by genetic analysis, 49 have been located on the sequence; P-element insertions have been mapped to 43 genes. Ninety-five (44%) of the known and predicted genes match a Drosophila EST, and 144 (66%) have clear similarities to proteins in other organisms. Genes known to have mutant phenotypes are more likely to be represented in cDNA libraries, and far more likely to have products similar to proteins of other organisms, than are genes with no known mutant phenotype. Over 650 chromosome aberration breakpoints map to this chromosome region, and their nonrandom distribution on the genetic map reflects variation in gene spacing on the DNA. This is the first large-scale analysis of the genome of D. melanogaster at the sequence level. In addition to the direct results obtained, this analysis has allowed us to develop and test methods that will be needed to interpret the complete sequence of the genome of this species. Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it. Milne 1926
ESTHER : Ashburner_1999_Genetics_153_179
PubMedSearch : Ashburner_1999_Genetics_153_179
PubMedID: 10471707